Into the Looking Glass [NOOK Book]

Overview

WORST TWO OUT OF THREE

When a 60 kiloton nuclear explosion destroys the University of Central Florida, terrorism is the first suspect. But terrorists don't generally leave doorways to another world in their wake. Or, rather, a generator of doorways to multiple other worlds.

With time of the essence, the Secretary of Defense scrounges up the nearest physicist with a high ...
See more details below
Into the Looking Glass

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$6.99
BN.com price

Overview

WORST TWO OUT OF THREE

When a 60 kiloton nuclear explosion destroys the University of Central Florida, terrorism is the first suspect. But terrorists don't generally leave doorways to another world in their wake. Or, rather, a generator of doorways to multiple other worlds.

With time of the essence, the Secretary of Defense scrounges up the nearest physicist with a high level security clearance. With doctorates in everything from nuclear physics to electrical engineering, William Weaver, PhD, is the egghead's egghead. On the other hand, with skills in everything from mountain biking to screaming electric guitar, he's also fast enough and tough enough to survive when the alien gates start disgorging ""demons.""

As a snap decision, he appears to be the perfect choice, smart, tough and capable. Now if he could only patch things up with his girlfriend, get his boss off his back and get his cellphone bill paid. Oh, yeah, and figure out why the heck these gates keep opening. Okay, so sometimes he's got priority issues.

As the gates spread and evil aliens spread with them, it is up to Weaver and SEAL Command Master Chief Miller to find a way to stop the proliferation and close the hostile gates. The problem being that the only way they can see to save the earth is destroy it. Then there's not going to be any more girlfriends or cellphones or bosses . . .

Hmmm...

Okay, two out of three of those are bad. They're really, really bad. Bad on toast. Bad like the Pacific is watery. Every day a Monday, bad.

One and a half at the very least. Worst two out of three.

Gotta prioritize. Guess Weaver and Miller are just gonna have to save the world.

At the publisher's request, this title is sold without DRM (Digital Rights Management).
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940148521310
  • Publisher: Baen
  • Publication date: 6/1/2005
  • Series: Looking Glass, #1
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 49,354
  • File size: 717 KB

Meet the Author

John Ringo had visited 23 countries and attended 14 schools by the time he graduated high school. This left him with a wonderful appreciation of the oneness of humanity and a permanent aversion to foreign food. He chose to study marine biology and really liked it. Unfortunately the pay was for beans. So he turned to quality control database management, where the pay was much better. His highest hopes were to someday upgrade to SQL Server, at which point, he thought, his life would be complete. But then Fate took a hand: John has become a professional science fiction writer, and is in the early stages of becoming fabulously wealthy, which his publisher has assured him is the common lot of science fiction writers who write for Baen Books. In addition to his own enthusiastically received and New York Times best-selling military SF series—A Hymn Before Battle, Gust Front, When the Devil Dances, and Hell's Faire—he is collaborating with fellow New York Times best-selling author David Weber on a new SF adventure series: March Upcountry, March to the Sea, March to the Stars and We Few with more to come.

With his bachelor years spent in the airborne, cave diving, rock-climbing, rappelling, hunting, spear-fishing, and sailing, the author is now happy to let other people risk their necks. He prefers to write science fiction (both alone and in collaboration with David Weber) raise Arabian horses, dandle his kids and watch the grass grow. Someday he may even cut it. But not today. Maybe tomorrow. Maybe he'll just let the horses eat it.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 19 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(13)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2008

    Outstanding Book

    One of Ringo's best. He does get a little too far into detail with the physics and weaponry and everything but still a great read. There are sequels somewhere to this but I can't find them.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2005

    A classic book

    Into the looking glass This book is called Into the looking glass. The author¿s name is John Ringo. This book takes place presently, in the U.S.A. The story is focused on a scientist named Dr. William Weaver. In Orlando University, and experiment goes way wrong. A miniature nuke destroys all of Orlando. The president calls up Weaver to come and help him get answers. Weaver had information that the scientists their were working on gate experiments (portals to other worlds). The president sends in Chief Miller in case military support is needed. It definitely is needed because when they go to investigate the phenomenon creatures come out and attack in huge numbers. After the gun slinging was over the creatures bring in organically made tanks to even out the odds. After that was over they quarantined it and found out more gates were appearing. Having no idea how to shut down these gates chief miller, Weaver and the rest of the bright minds in America must find a way to kill these creatures and shut down the gates before they overrun earth. I really didn¿t like that it went slow in the middle of the book. In the beginning and the end the book was really exciting because there were a lot of major military, shooting aliens action. It was kind of hard to understand because of the science involved in it but eventually I understood it. The ending was suspected but still interesting. I think John Ringo could have made it a faster book by having a little less talk. The book is presented in first person and some third person narrating. I liked how he switched it around. The words in this book are very technical it took me a while to figure them out but I did. John Ringo sounded like he knew what he was talking about but he did say that in actuality not all of the physics were not entirely accurate. I am glad that he put some technical principals into the book but he could have speeded it up and put more fight scenes in it. I would give this book 3 1/2stars because I loved it but in the middle it really got boring. I can understand since it was classified as a science fiction book he needed to have a little more science in it which is probably why he had that happen but other than that, it was also a military kind of book. Ringo recommends this book to spec ops solders because he knew that they would like the content. I am really interested in military fiction books and science fiction, and John Ringo puts them together. I have to say that this is one of the best books I have ever read. I have to say that I am likely to read another book on Ringo. There was a lot of language in this book so I don¿t recommend this book for younger ages. For people who like militarized books and science fiction this is a great book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2005

    Entertaining, but not Ringo's best

    The opening of this book is fantastic, and does much to draw readers in. The action is as well written and exciting as ever. Unfortunately, the plot slows to a crawl in the middle of the book, as too much time is spent trying to explain some really high-level physics that most readers probably won't understand. It would have been better if he'd simply left it at 'A lab accident created wormholes to other worlds.' We could accept that without tons of explanations. How bosons are able to move and link up with each other made no sense at all. I also think character development could have been taken further. Weaver and Miller don't feel as 3-D as some of Ringo's other characters. Ringo's trademark sarcastic humor shines through here, making for an entertaining read. The Dreen are, in my opinion, the coolest enemy Ringo has ever devised, even cooler than the Posleen. The book is relatively short, but it feels complete. I'm looking forward to seeing where this series goes. I'd recommend it to fans of Ringo's work.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2005

    Two Thumbs and both Big Toes

    This book explodes onto the science fiction scene as massively as its opening and holds a reader's attention (much like being the recipient of an Alien face-hugger, without the messy part later). Although Mr. Ringo is producing books at a truly prolific rate, his latest work shows no decline in quality...realistic heroes, questionable allies, enemy collaborators you almost feel sorry for, and a nigh-overwhelming antagonist that makes you feel like saying 'Break out the butter because mankind's TOAST...' What impressed me the most was that unlike his previous efforts (all of which I enjoyed), this time there isn't the 'hulking brute genius' like his characters Mike O'Neal (my dad still chuckles over that one) or Herzer Herrick, who could always somehow outwit Patton and bench-press his tank for fun...this time both main protagonists are strong and smart, but need each other to survive (and still walk away needing a Big Box o' Band-Aids). If I could say anything about this story, it's that the title is exceptionally poetic...aside from the obvious 'Alice in Wonderland' reference, Ringo's latest work is a surprisingly accurate reflection of our own world seen through sci-fi eyes; heroes who wish they weren't, but rise to the occasion anyway...science shown as both our salvation and destruction...aliens shown as friend, foe, and dubious 'allies'...a government dedicated to defense but unsure of how to defend...and let's not forget the science nerd who doubles as an athlete and, what I personally appreciate most, Ringo's most realistic portrayal of our SEALs by someone from outside the Navy SpecWar community (though his time in the 82nd Airborne gives him first-hand knowledge of special operations), when too many of today's authors portray SEALs and candidates (Class 197 myself) as superhiman killing machines...Ringo's SEALS frequently got tired, hurt, and frustrated, but trye to form just kept going... In all, a must-have book for any serious sci-fi reader!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    humorous action-packed science fiction

    Thirty seconds after the president learns the news, the country is stunned as the media reports an explosion devastated the University of Central Florida. However, no radiation or electromagnetic pulse is detected; the NSA eliminates terrorists using an unheard of WMD, a non viable option. Everyone soon agrees that something happened in the lab of Dr. Ray Chen. They dispatch the only available physicist with a top secret clearance, the poster boy for absent minded Professor Dr. William Weaver accompanied by Navy SEAL Command Master Chief Robert Miller to investigate. --- William and Robert reach ground zero where Chen¿s former lab was; they find an interdimensional doorway that works from both sides. This enables invading aliens to enter planning to conquer the earth. Only Weaver and Miller with rednecks and some real army stand in the way of the deadly Dreen who annihilate life on planets. Non-Dreen ETs follow who are not malevolent towards earth, but plan to blow the place up if William fails to close the door. --- INTO THE LOOKING GLASS is a humorous action-packed science fiction that will remind readers of the opening of the Hitchhiker¿s Guide to the Galaxy as the not so bad ETs want to blow up the planet though no malice is intended. William is terrific as he cannot remember to pay his cell phone bill or call his irate girlfriend, but the President knows this Huntsville resident must save the world. Weaver¿s partner Robert is real military struggling to accept that he needs the nerd to succeed. John Ringo is at his most amusing best with these doorways to and from other dimensions leading to a wonderful save the earth sci fi.---- Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)