Into the Storm: A Study in Command

( 16 )

Overview

General Frederick M. Franks, Jr., commanded the armor and infantry of VII Corps, the main coalition force that broke the back of Iraq's Republican Guard. Never before have the land war, and the art of maneuver warfare itself, been explored so incisively and in such rich, provocative detail. Clancy and Franks take us deep inside the war councils and command posts and up to the front lines, to show us a war that few people even knew, that television never showed.

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Overview

General Frederick M. Franks, Jr., commanded the armor and infantry of VII Corps, the main coalition force that broke the back of Iraq's Republican Guard. Never before have the land war, and the art of maneuver warfare itself, been explored so incisively and in such rich, provocative detail. Clancy and Franks take us deep inside the war councils and command posts and up to the front lines, to show us a war that few people even knew, that television never showed.

Inaugurating a new series of military history works by #1 bestselling author Tom Clancy, Into the Storm takes a look deep into the operational art of war as seen through the eyes of some of America's most outstanding commanders. 8 pp. of photos. 320 pp. 800,000 print.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Having conquered the best sellers lists in both the fiction and nonfiction arenas, Clancy now offers the first in a series of historical accounts of American military leaders in times of war. His first target: the Gulf War.
Booknews
This is the first of a series of nonfiction works by the author known for his military fiction, exploring the hearts and minds of four American military leaders active in the Gulf War to reveal the nature of war and command from the inside. Includes b&w diagrams and maps. No index. For general readers. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780425196779
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/1/2004
  • Series: Commander Series , #1
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 768
  • Sales rank: 362,256
  • Product dimensions: 6.74 (w) x 4.14 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Tom Clancy was the author of eighteen #1 New York Times-bestselling novels. His first effort, The Hunt for Red October, sold briskly as a result of rave reviews, then catapulted onto the bestseller list after President Ronald Reagan pronounced it "the perfect yarn." Clancy was the undisputed master at blending exceptional realism and authenticity, intricate plotting, and razor-sharp suspense. He died in October 2013.

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    1. Hometown:
      Huntingtown, Maryland
    1. Date of Birth:
      April 12, 1947
    2. Place of Birth:
      Baltimore, Maryland
    1. Date of Death:
      October 1, 2013
    2. Place of Death:
      Baltimore, Maryland

Interviews & Essays

Monday, May 19th, barnesandnoble on AOL welcomed Tom Clancy and retired four-star general Fred Franks Jr. Tom Clancy is the author of nine bestselling novels, including THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, PATRIOT GAMES, CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER, DEBT OF HONOR, and EXECUTIVE ORDERS. For his latest book, INTO THE STORM -- which looks deeply into the operational art of war -- Clancy has teamed up with General Franks.



Tom Clancy: Howdy. Let me begin by saying something. Fred Franks is one of my heroes. He may not look like John Wayne, but he really did it, and this book is about him. Okay, shall we begin?



Question: What was it like to work with General Schwarzkopf? Did you work closely throughout Desert Storm? Tom, do you know the general?

Tom Clancy: I have met Norm, but I'll let Fred handle this. Take it, pal.

Fred Franks: OK. I worked most closely with John Yeosock, 3d Army commander, but also got to brief General Schwarzkopf.


Question: Mr. Clancy and General Franks, what does the U.S. have to prepare for most in the future? Terrorism, smaller battles, etc.?

Tom Clancy: That's a good question, and nobody has the answer. The future will probably not hold much in the way of major conflicts. Saddam Hussein helped us teach the world why that is not a good idea, but we need to be ready for them in any case. Similarly, we need to train ourselves to handle terrorism and low-intensity conflict, and that is an exercise in intelligence more than anything else.

Fred Franks: I think we have to continue to be ready for a full range of challenges and not get fixed on one.


Question: General Franks, why did you decide to have your corps launch their attack a day earlier than planned in the Persian Gulf War?

Fred Franks: We were ordered to attack earlier. I was asked if we could go early. I said yes and we went. We were asked at 0930 and could have gone anytime after noon. We attacked at 1430. Reacting that fast was a tribute to the soldiers and small-unit leaders. I was proud of them.


Question: This question is for both Tom and the general: What do you think about the perspective changes in the American armed forces, e.g., the U.S. will now only be prepared to fight two simultaneous wars instead of three.

Tom Clancy: I'll leave that one to Fred as well. (Guys, I'm just a writer. Fred's the general.)

Fred Franks: Since the Bottom Up Review, it has been two what are called MRCs, or major regional contingencies.


Question: Tom, it amazes me that you are privy to sooooo much information concerning the armed forces. How did you manage to get "beyond the firewall" and embraced by our commanders?

Tom Clancy: Well, I guess they like me. But seriously, I tell the truth. It really is that simple. I have never been given classified information. I don't need it.


Question: This question is for General Franks: As a military man, do you ever wish you could travel back in time and experience warfare when it was less sophisticated?

Fred Franks: No, I felt fortunate to have been able to serve when I did and with the troops I served with.


Question: Do either of you find the recent findings regarding chemical weapons in Desert Storm disturbing? Are you surprised? Is this addressed in INTO THE STORM?

Fred Franks: We were prepared for chemical warfare, but as far as we could determine it was not used during the war. In the book I talk of our preparations and our Task Force Demo that blew up Iraqi ammo after the war.


Question: Do you discuss the U.S. Army during the 1970s and the damage it suffered in INTO THE STORM?

Tom Clancy: Yes, we do, but Fred, again, is the expert.

Fred Franks: Yes, that is covered in the chapter on the "Rebirth of the Army," a good-news story for America. That rebirth was a story of a lot of hard work, determination, and sacrifice by many.


Question: Tom, at what age did you realize that you loved all that was military, and what triggered your passion?

Tom Clancy: I guess I just like the toys. All the rights we have were won for us in battle. That's how the world works. The soldier gave you every right you have.


Question: Will you guys work on another nonfiction book together?

Tom Clancy: One thing at a time. We have to sell this one first.


Question: I have heard you talk about the "big five" in INTO THE STORM. Can you explain this?

Tom Clancy: Not sure what you mean. Fred?

Fred Franks: The big five were major weapons programs (Tank, Bradley, Apache, Blackhawk, Patriot) in the '80s. It was a way to tell the Congress the army's most pressing needs for modernization. It was a way thought up by General Bill DePuy and approved by General Creighton Abrams in the mid-'70s. It worked, and they all were superb performers in Desert Storm.


Question: What are the biggest effects information technology will have on the military, the world? Do you both use the Internet to research your books?

Tom Clancy: War is about information. The commander who knows the most will always win the battle. In the research side, that wasn't necessary. Fred Franks did it all himself.

Fred Franks: Thanks, Tom! Info tech can potentially move needed info about the battlefield much more rapidly. That is a big plus. The army just completed an experiment at Fort Irwin on this area. We have been looking at it since 1992.


Question: Mr. Clancy, how are things going at Red Storm Entertainment? What can we expect to see from you in the next year?

Tom Clancy: Classified. We will field one game this fall. That is all I can say right now.


Question: I look forward to reading INTO THE STORM. What should I, as a civilian, take away from it?

Tom Clancy: You will learn what it means to be a commander, how hard it is, how smart you have to be. The sheer intellectual complexity of the task will awe you.

Fred Franks: A story about land warfare and what soldiers and commanders do when called. A story about battle.


Question: General Franks, what is the greatest reward living a military life? Mr. Clancy, what is the greatest reward writing about the military life?

Tom Clancy: Getting to know the best people we have. Three weeks ago I was at Fort Irwin, the National Training Center. The quality of the kids beggars description, and they're still ready.

Fred Franks: The greatest reward is the cause we serve and those soldiers we are privileged to serve with in peace and war.


Moderator: Thank you, Tom Clancy and General Fred Franks! Thank you for coming, everyone!

Tom Clancy: Guys, thanks for coming.

Fred Franks: Many thanks for the questions and interest.


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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 16 )
Rating Distribution

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(9)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 19 of 16 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2005

    Maybe a little too much detail...

    I picked this book up in hopes of learning more about the Gulf War. It starts out giving you a history of Fred Franks service and was interesting. Then it gets into the art of war with a lot of definitions and strategies of war. While this may be interesting to some, it is probably boring to the more casual non-military reader such as myself. Then if finally gets back to the Gulf. While it was boring at times it is fairly interesting reading and points out that the Gulf War was not a cake walk for the warriors that fought day and night for victory. The book could probably lose about 150-200 pages and it would be a little more to the point and hold the readers interest. I gave it 4 stars because it does a good job of recognizing the great job the service men did.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2004

    Clancy Needs to Stick to Straight Fiction

    Just another of his books where some military type 'helps' him write. Boooooring.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2003

    A Great Book

    I think this book was the best, Franks and Clancy are great. I love this book and I would love to see more books like this one. I hope that people will love this book as much as I do. Franks and Clancy are the best!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2002

    A Fine Study of the Army at the Operational Level

    This book covers the story of the US Army, and one officer in particular, as they recovered from the Viet Nam era, and went on to their astounding victory in the Deserts of Iraq and Kuwait. If you want to see just what those stars on a General's collar mean, read this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2001

    Salute to 'Into the Storm'

    This was an excellent and heartfelt portrayal of Desert Storm by a fabulous person, my cousin once removed, General Frederick Franks. I have had the honor to meet him, and the book does little justice to this wonderful man. Clancy's writing does nice service to the cause, but the perspective from Franks himself steals the show. The experience in Cambodia where he lost his leg was incredibly moving. I think it was a fine book and would highly recommend.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2000

    A personal and US Army transformation

    Clancy and Franks have combined to write a terrific account of the parallel transformation of General Franks and the US Army, both wounded in Vietnam. This book could serve as a primer for the reader who wants to understand the doctrine of US Army armored and mechanized warfare.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2000

    Clancy with another great novel

    Tom Clancy hit the jackpot again with another fabulous story. This inspiring novel has a great plot and is another great techno-military thriller. This is one of the best that Clancy has to offer.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2000

    Stormy Review

    This book dragged on forever. Considering how many times ideas and topics were reiterated I think there may have been 100-150 actual pages of content...the rest was repetetive filler. I also got the impression from Franks that he wanted to make this book his own personal vendeta against General Schwartzkopf. I'm sorry they did not get along, but another forum should have been used to express their differences. If you have not read this book yet....don't start now.

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