BN.com Gift Guide

Into the Unknown: Leadership Lessons of Lewis and Clark's Daring Westward Expedition

Overview

If life is an adventure, no one will ever live it more fully than Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson to explore the rumored Northwest Passage, Lewis and Clark instead discovered a seemingly endless land whose very existence foretold a future America infinitely different from what had been imagined.

May 2004 marks the beginning of a two-and-a-half year bicentennial celebration of their incredible journey and its significance to the ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (21) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $9.80   
  • Used (16) from $0.00   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 4 of 5
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$9.80
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(342)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2004 Hardcover Brand New. 100% Money Back Guarantee! Ships within 1 business day, includes tracking. Carefully packed. Serving satisfied customers since 1987.

Ships from: Darby, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$15.85
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(89)

Condition: New
2004-04-01 Hardcover New HARDCOVER, BRAND NEW, Perfect Shape, No Black Remainder Mark,

Ships from: La Grange, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$15.85
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(89)

Condition: New
2004-04 Hardcover New HARDCOVER, BRAND NEW COPY, Perfect Shape, No Black Remainder Mark,

Ships from: La Grange, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$60.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(188)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 4 of 5
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

If life is an adventure, no one will ever live it more fully than Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson to explore the rumored Northwest Passage, Lewis and Clark instead discovered a seemingly endless land whose very existence foretold a future America infinitely different from what had been imagined.

May 2004 marks the beginning of a two-and-a-half year bicentennial celebration of their incredible journey and its significance to the history of America. Against staggering odds, these unique men inspired such absolute loyalty in each other and in their group that they are still widely regarded as the most successful leadership team in American history.

Today's leadership adventures unfold in the rugged terrain of business, and who better than Lewis and Clark to lead us through its toughest challenges? Their story resonates with business leaders of our time because they had to:

• Think strategically
• Make tough and timely decisions
• Surround themselves with good people
• Manage resources
• Motivate the team
• Deal with different cultures
• Assimilate information from many sources
• Balance long-term goals against short-term realities
• Learn from their mistakes
• Try new approaches

Most importantly, they had to persevere and change course in the face of adversity. Their lessons will inspire business leaders to take their teams to new adventures of great discovery.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"The book is a fascinating blend of history and leadership insights--will help readers in their own journey into the unknown." --Toronto Globe Mail

"Mr.Uldrich brings the journey alive...Lewis & Clark as they make crucial leadership decisions that led to the expedition's ultimate success." --Dallas Morning News

"Imagine a Ken Burns documentary with insightful analysis from Jack Welch and you have a sense of the infomative and engaging approach Uldrich utilizes." --Executive Insider

Latching onto the idea that everything old is new again, Uldrich, a former naval officer and author of The Next Big Thing Is Really Small, puts forth Lewis and Clark as two shining examples of all that is right with leadership and management. Spotlighting the pair's many strong points, from people skills and future-thinking capabilities to optimism and an ability to see the forest as well as the trees, Uldrich (drawing on what has obviously been years of extensive research) points to modern-day companies like Coca-Cola, General Electric and DaimlerChrysler as entities that could all learn something from Lewis and Clark. Whether the "project" is a westward expedition or a hostile corporate takeover, Uldrich makes the case that the past isn't so different from the present—or from the future. The parallels between these men and today's leaders are intriguing and well thought out. For corporate types looking for tips, there is certainly plenty to digest, even if the narrative goes deeper into the history of the westward exploration than is needed for a management primer. The overriding messages are clear: mentor and be mentored; find a way to balance the task at hand with the overall future vision; maintain a confident and optimistic approach from the beginning.

Executive Insider
...Jack Uldrich has done a generally excellent job drawing lessons from the heroic and inspirational 'management style' of explorers Lewis and Clark....Imagine a Ken Burns documentary with insightful analysis from Jack Welch, and you have a sense of the informative and engaging approach Uldrich utilizes.
True West
With all the Lewis and Clark books coming out during the bicentennial celebration of their expedition, this is one to own?.Every CEO and anyone with business aspirations should read this insightful book, which teaches that socially responsible behavior pays off.
Publishers Weekly
Latching onto the idea that everything old is new again, Uldrich, a former naval officer and author of The Next Big Thing Is Really Small, puts forth Lewis and Clark as two shining examples of all that is right with leadership and management. Spotlighting the pair's many strong points, from people skills and future-thinking capabilities to optimism and an ability to see the forest as well as the trees, Uldrich (drawing on what has obviously been years of extensive research) points to modern-day companies like Coca-Cola, General Electric and DaimlerChrysler as entities that could all learn something from Lewis and Clark. Whether the "project" is a westward expedition or a hostile corporate takeover, Uldrich makes the case that the past isn't so different from the present-or from the future. The parallels between these men and today's leaders are intriguing and well thought out. For corporate types looking for tips, there is certainly plenty to digest, even if the narrative goes deeper into the history of the westward exploration than is needed for a management primer. The overriding messages are clear: mentor and be mentored; find a way to balance the task at hand with the overall future vision; maintain a confident and optimistic approach from the beginning. (Apr.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Uldrich, president of the Nano Veritas Group, an international nanotechnology consulting firm, shares lessons learned from the remarkable journey of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark as they sought out the rumored Northwest Passage. In the courage and determination of these iconic explorers, Uldrich found a metaphor that would help business leaders prepare for the unknown. Uldrich provides a concise summary of the historical significance of the expedition and relates its meaning to today's harried business executives, offering such leadership lessons as having a passionate purpose, sharing leadership, maintaining diversity, and leading from the front. Thankfully, this book is not embarrassingly banal, as are so many other "leadership lesson" titles. While aimed at businesses and organizations, this title nicely complements recent historical works on the Lewis and Clark expedition, including Dayton Duncan and Ken Burns's Lewis and Clark and David Lavender's The Way to the Western Sea. Highly recommended for business and leadership sections in all larger public libraries.-Dale Farris, Groves, TX Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Soundview Executive Book Summaries
Into the Unknown charts the lessons in leadership that were learned by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark during their two-and-a-half year adventure into the American Northwest. Against staggering odds, these unique men inspired such absolute loyalty in each other and in their group of explorers that they are still regarded as the most successful leadership team in American history. To help business leaders navigate their way through the rugged terrain of modern business, consultant and author Jack Uldrich presents Lewis and Clark as examples of leaders who were able to take their team through the roughest environments and the toughest challenges.

Throughout Into the Unknown, Uldrich shows readers how they can use Lewis and Clark's example to persevere through crises and even change course in the face of insurmountable adversity. By presenting the lessons they learned on their seminal journey to explore the interior of the North American continent and reach the Pacific, Uldrich offers 10 timeless lessons from their experiences that can inspire business leaders to take their teams to new adventures of great discovery in any era.

Why Lewis and Clark Matter
Into the Unknown does not attempt to retell the Lewis and Clark story as a narrative of their expedition with the Corps of Discovery. Rather, it examines their expedition through the lens of leadership and applies the extraordinary leadership lessons of Lewis and Clark to today's rapidly changing and often unknowable business environment. Even though their expedition took place 200 years ago, the challenges these two captains faced and those confronting the leaders of today are more similar than most might expect. The advancements of technology and knowledge itself are propelling us faster and faster downriver and, like Lewis and Clark, we don't know what is around the next bend. Similarly, the relentless force of globalization is introducing us to new cultures and hurling unexpected challenges and opportunities at us to the same degree that Lewis and Clark had to respond to - and deal with - dozens of new and different Native American tribes and cultures.

Who better to turn to for guidance when dealing with the unknown than those who have already demonstrated that they were capable of successfully conquering the unknown? There are many parallels that make Lewis and Clark useful and solid examples for today's business executives. Like today's business leaders, Lewis and Clark were driven by an important mission and were determined to succeed at all costs. Those struggling with organizational issues can find guidance in the experiences of Lewis and Clark and the ways they handled and overcame similar challenges.

They masterminded the expedition's success, and their leadership skills lie at the heart of the mission's extraordinary accomplishments. Team member Private Whitehouse spoke eloquently about their leadership prowess when he described the captains' skill, courage and humanity filling "the breasts of the men who were under their command ... and the President of the United States not misplacing his judgment when he appointed them to command this party." Copyright © 2004 Soundview Executive Book Summaries

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780814408162
  • Publisher: AMACOM
  • Publication date: 3/20/2004
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 6.24 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface
Part I: Why Lewis and Clark Matter
Introduction: Lewis and Clark: Leaders for Their Time ? and Ours

Part II: The Leadership Principles of Lewis and Clark
Chapter 1 Passionate Purpose: The Principle of a Higher Purpose
Chapter 2 Productive Partnering: The Principle of Shared Leadership
Chapter 3 Future Think: The Principle of Strategic Preparation
Chapter 4 Honoring Differences: The Principle of Diversity
Chapter 5 Equitable Justice: The Principle of Compassionate Discipline
Chapter 6 Absolute Responsibility: The Principle of Leading from the Front
Chapter 7 Meaningful Mentoring: The Principle of Learning From Others
Chapter 8 Realistic Optimism: The Principle of Positive Thinking
Chapter 9 Rational Risk: The Principle of Aggressive Analysis
Chapter 10 Cultivating a Corps of Discovery: The Principle of Teamwork
Epilogue
Notes
Bibliography
Appendixes
The Journey of the Corps of Discovery: A Summary of Key Events and Dates
Members of the Corps of Discovery
Index
Acknowledgements
About the Author
Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Into the Unknown


By Jay Uldrich

AMACOM Books

Copyright © 2004 Jay Uldrich
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-8144-0816-8


Chapter One

Passionate Purpose

The Principle of a Higher Calling

By adverting to the dignity of this higher calling, our ancestors have turned a savage wilderness into a glorious empire, and have made the most extensive and the only honorable conquests not by destroying, but by promoting the wealth, the number, the happiness of the human race. -Edmund Burke

Twelve years before Lewis and Clark reached the Pacific, Alexander Mackenzie, a Scottish explorer working as an agent for the North West Company (a fur-trading company operating under the auspices of Great Britain), made a daring transcontinental journey across Canada and, on a rock located near Bella Coola, British Columbia, penned the famous line: "Alexander Mackenzie, from Canada, by land, the twenty-second of July, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-three." In so doing, he became the first European to make a land passage across the North American continent. By 1801, a full three years before Lewis and Clark's party even got under way, Mackenzie had published a book about his expedition entitled Voyages from Montreal.

Why, then, one might ask, do we celebrate Lewis and Clark and not Alexander Mackenzie? It is a fair question. Mackenzie is certainly worthy of both praise and historical attention, but there are three reasons why his accomplishments are surpassed by those of Lewis and Clark.

First, Mackenzie's trek to the Pacific was done entirely for commercial purposes. Acting as a private agent, Mackenzie's goal was to locate an all-water route in order to further the fur-trading interests of the British Empire. In fact, his book begins with a general history of the fur trade and concludes with a call to the British Parliament to place commerce in the pelts of beaver and sea otter under the control of private Canadian fur traders. Lewis and Clark's voyage of discovery, by contrast, was much broader in concept. It was dedicated to nation building, the Manifest Destiny of the United States to expand to the Pacific, land exploration, scientific and cultural discovery, and commercial trade.

The second reason Lewis and Clark receive greater attention than Mackenzie is because their expedition went deeper in the execution of its mission. Mackenzie recorded few scientific findings on plants or animals and provided little useful information on the indigenous peoples he encountered. In his book, Mackenzie admitted as much by stating, "I do not possess the science of a naturalist," and noting that he didn't have time to "collect the plants which nature might have scattered on the way." In short, his journey did little to extend the knowledge of the human race. As noted by Lewis and Clark historian James Ronda, Alexander Mackenzie "wore but one hat."

Compare this with Lewis and Clark, who left behind, through their journals, one and a half million words about everything-from the land, animals, and Indians they encountered to the flora, fauna, fish, and fossils they found. They chronicled a virtual treasure trove of scientific and cultural information for the entire civilized world to digest. In their day, Lewis's surveys on the Indians represented the first glimpse of those peoples and cultures, and Clark's maps served as invaluable guides to the first generation of explorers who helped settle the American West.

All told, Lewis and Clark recorded more than 200 plants and animals that were new to science and noted at least seventy-two different Indian tribes. But in order to fully comprehend the depth of the captains' contribution to society, it is important to understand that their writings still offer value today. Lewis's documentation of certain Indian tribes-which are now extinct-remains the sole source of information society has on these cultures, and his recordings of various plants and weather conditions still provide present-day botanists and meteorologists useful historical information.

The third, and most important, reason that Lewis and Clark stand apart from Alexander Mackenzie as historical figures, however, is because of their commitment to a higher purpose. As men of the Enlightenment, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark wanted to leave their mark on the world by expanding the base of human knowledge; and, as patriots, they wanted to further the cause of liberty by extending the great American Experiment of democracy to the recently purchased Louisiana Territory and beyond to the Pacific. Their commitment to these higher purposes, which transcended the mere worldly aspirations of power, glory, ego, or money, shines through their journals, and it is clear they affected virtually every action and decision Lewis and Clark made.

It is therefore with this first leadership principle, passionate purpose-the principle of a higher calling-that I begin Part II of this book.

Men of the Enlightenment

To begin to understand Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, it is necessary to understand that they were both products of eighteenth-century Virginia; and Virginia, at that time, is where the American Enlightenment most flourished. This meant that from an early age, both men were steeped in the philosophy of the Enlightenment.

Meriwether Lewis best espoused the philosophy in his journal entry of August 18, 1805:

This day I completed my thirty first year, and conceived that I had in all human probability now existed about half the period which I am to remain in this Sublunary world. I reflected that I had yet done but little, very little indeed, to further the happiness of the human race, or to advance the information of the succeeding generation ... and resolve in the future ... to live for mankind, as I have heretofore lived for myself.

In this single passage, Lewis tells us almost everything we need to know about why Thomas Jefferson had chosen him to lead the expedition and why he decided to accept the invitation. He wanted to contribute something of real and long-lasting value to society. He wanted to make the world a better place.

In his book William Clark: Jeffersonian Man on the Frontier, Jerome Steffen correctly pointed out that "Clark never wrote anything like 'I am an Enlightenment man.'" But Steffen added that it became "apparent through his actions that [Clark was] saying 'My life was deeply affected by Enlightenment ideas and Jeffersonian principles.'" William Clark, like Meriwether Lewis, understood from the beginning that the journey was about more than commerce.

The key tenets of the Enlightenment philosophy shed valuable light on how Lewis and Clark, by embracing the philosophy, unwittingly prepared themselves for the expedition and how it influenced their respective decisions to accept the invitation to co-lead the expedition.

The Enlightenment held that "progress ... was a product of individuals seeking to uncover the secrets of the universe." From this perspective, then, the very nature of the expedition-an invitation to travel into and discover the unknown-spoke to the very purpose of their being. More than just an intellectual opportunity, the invitation to explore the interior of the North American continent was a calling to a higher purpose and makes Lewis and Clark's decision to leave their comfortable lives and their loved ones behind easier to understand.

Another tenet of Enlightenment thinking held that man was rational and, through education and training, had the potential to do good. Lifelong education, therefore, was an essential prerequisite to giving meaning to one's life, which helps explain why both men placed so much emphasis on educating themselves and on acquiring skills to "uncover the secrets of the universe."

Finally, the Enlightenment held that spiritual fulfillment was obtained by seeking God's natural order through the application of the natural sciences and constant observation. The expedition, Lewis and Clark knew, would call forth both responsibilities in spades and thus represented an opportunity for spiritual fulfillment. William Clark captured this sentiment when he wrote that his religious duties included "endeavoring to make our fellow creatures happy." He believed that the new knowledge the Corps of Discovery would discover could, in some measure, bring happiness to his fellow man. Lewis, while arguably less spiritual than Clark, picked up on this theme when he said, after the expedition returned in the fall of 1806, that one of the purposes of the expedition was to "relieve distressed humanity."

Children of the American Revolution

This enlightened thinking, which also manifests itself in the writings of America's founding fathers-and thus in the very creation of America itself-also necessitated that the country and the principles upon which it was founded be protected. Born in 1770 and 1774, respectively, Clark and Lewis grew up literally and figuratively in the shadow of the Revolutionary War. William Clark's oldest brother, George Rogers Clark, was a hero of the Revolutionary War and helped secure the Ohio and Kentucky frontiers from British-sponsored Indian invasions. So significant were his accomplishments that Benjamin Franklin once said of the elder Clark, "Young man, you have given an empire to the Republic." Eighteen years his junior, William Clark grew up hearing stories from his older brother and was greatly influenced by him. The fact that four of his other brothers fought in the war-including one who died a prisoner on a British warship-also had a lifelong impact on him. At his first opportunity, Clark followed them into the military.

Meriwether Lewis, whose family motto, Omni solum forti patria est, can be translated as "Everything the brave man does is for his country," was similarly influenced by his family. His birth father, William Lewis, served without pay as a lieutenant under George Washington, as did his stepfather, John Marks, who served as a captain in the Army.

In 1794, Lewis joined the Army to help suppress the Whiskey Rebellion, a revolt by people living in the West who were opposed to the federal government taxing their whiskey. Unsympathetic to the rebels' cause, Lewis wrote that he joined the Army "to support the glorious cause of liberty, and my country." It is a phrase that he repeated in later correspondence to his family.

A Decision to Lead

In 1803, like two rivers converging, "Enlightenment opportunity" merged with patriotic necessity. At the time, the entire territory west of the Mississippi embodied the great unknown. Therefore, to men of the Enlightenment, it represented the opportunity to advance human knowledge. It was also one of the primary reasons Jefferson felt compelled to explore the uncharted regions.

Then in July 1803, as the expedition was still in its preparation phase, the United States purchased from France the Louisiana Territory. The country doubled in size overnight. The U.S. government needed to understand what it had just purchased and required a small team to explore this new land and report back on both the opportunities and the challenges that the new territory represented.

Furthermore, the territory to the west of the Louisiana Territory, the Oregon Territory, was still up for grabs in the high-stakes game of international politics. Great Britain had already begun to lay a claim to the entire territory after Alexander Mackenzie's successful land crossing through Canada in 1793 and George Vancouver's naval expedition to the Northwest the previous year. Thomas Jefferson understood that the United States had to act fast. Lewis and Clark also realized what was at stake, and it stirred their patriotic fervor to be able to serve their country by beating the British to the territory and securing the area for their country and countrymen.

Balance of Personal Interest with the Common Good

Little is known about Lewis and Clark's personal motivations to co-lead the expedition, but it is realistic to assume that neither man did it entirely for altruistic purposes. Lewis's journal entry on April 7, 1805, in which he compared the expedition to "those deservedly famed adventurers," Christopher Columbus and James Cook, suggests that he was very cognizant of the potential for future fame. That both men would be entitled to land grants in excess of 1,600 acres upon the successful completion of the journey cannot be discounted as a source of motivation, nor is it unreasonable to assume that William Clark, as the younger brother of a legendary war hero, joined the expedition as a way to measure up to his older brother's accomplishments.

However, none of these factors alone explain why the two took on all the risks associated with the transcontinental journey. For example, if Lewis had aspired solely to power, he would have chosen to remain the personal secretary to the president of the United States, where, by day, he could move among society's most powerful politicians and, by night, dine with many of the world's greatest thinkers. Instead, he willingly left his high-powered position in the White House for a life of hardship, danger, and uncertain success. Moreover, if Lewis had been interested solely in glory, he would have chosen to lead the expedition by himself, without the assistance of William Clark. If the expedition had been about ego, William Clark would never have agreed to share command with a man four years his junior who had once served under Clark's command. And if either man had been interested in money, they would have been far better off managing and adding land to their vast plantations-something both men were extremely capable of doing.

Instead, Lewis and Clark sought to align their own self-interest with the national interest and the greater good of mankind. The Age of Enlightenment philosophy held that this was not only possible, but actually desirable. As Jerome Steffen noted, "The trip to the Northwest made sense to William Clark-not just for himself but for the good of the country."

It is important to understand that Lewis and Clark did not first seek fame, power, and riches with the idea that those tools would then be used to benefit their country and mankind; it was the other way around. By advancing knowledge for mankind and fostering liberty, they were confident that they would also personally benefit.

For instance, once they had reached the Pacific Ocean, fame was undoubtedly theirs, but rather than hasten their return to St. Louis to bask in their newfound celebrity, the captains knowingly prolonged their journey and agreed to split up on the return trip in order to explore more of the Louisiana Territory. Their respective trips yielded little information that would be of personal benefit to either man, but they understood that their maps of these new areas would greatly help those who would follow.

Lewis and Clark both planned to profit from their knowledge of the fur-trading business (the most profitable industry of the day) upon their return.

Continues...


Excerpted from Into the Unknown by Jay Uldrich Copyright © 2004 by Jay Uldrich. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)