Introducing English Semantics

Introducing English Semantics

by Charles W. Kreidler
     
 

ISBN-10: 0415180635

ISBN-13: 9780415180634

Pub. Date: 05/06/1998

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Focusing on the English language, this comprehensive and accessible introduction to semantics explores how languages organize and express meaning through words, parts of words and sentences.

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Overview

Focusing on the English language, this comprehensive and accessible introduction to semantics explores how languages organize and express meaning through words, parts of words and sentences.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780415180634
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
05/06/1998
Pages:
348
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.81(d)
Lexile:
1200L (what's this?)

Table of Contents

1 The Study of Meaning

1.1 The Systemic Study of Meaning

1.2 The Nature of Language

1.3 Language and the Individual

Demonstrating Semantic Knowledge

2 Language in Use

2.1 Pragmatics

2.2 Natural and Conventional Signs

2.3

Linguistic Signs

2.4 Utterance and Sentence

2.5 Prosody

2.6 Non-Verbal Communication

3 The Dimensions of Meaning

3.1 Reference and Denotation

3.2 Connotation

3.3 Sense Relations

3.4 Lexical and Grammatical Meanings

3.5 Morphemes

3.6 Homonymy

and Polysemy

3.7 Lexical Ambiguity

3.8 Sentence Meaning

4 Semantic Roles

4.1 Sentence and Proposition

4.2 Semantic Roles

4.2.1 Valency Zero

4.2.2 Valency One

4.2.3 Valency Two

4.3 Some Changes in Valency

5 Lexical Relations

5.1

Lexical Fields

5.2 Kinship

5.3 Hyponymy

5.4 Synonymy

5.5 Antonymy

5.6 Binary and Non-Binary Antonyms

5.7 A Comparison of Four Relations

5.8 Converse Antonyms

5.9 Symmetry and Reciprocity

5.10 Expressions of Quantity

6 Transition and Transfer

Predicates

6.1 Transition

6.2 Transfer

7 Reference

7.1 Referents and Referring Expressions

7.2 Extension and Intension

7.3 Some Different Kinds of Referents

7.3.1 Unique and Non-Unique Referents

7.3.2 Concrete and Abstract Referents

7.3.3

Countable and Non-Countable Referents

7.4 Different Ways of Referring

7.4.1 Generic and Non-Generic Reference

7.4.2 Specific and Non-Specific Reference

7.4.3 Definite and Indefinite Reference

7.5 Deixis

7.6 Anaphora

7.7 Shifts in Ways of Referring

7.8

Referential Ambiguity

8 Sentences as Arguments

8.1 Full Statement Clauses

8.2 Question Clauses

8.3 Infinitive Clauses

8.4 Gerund Clauses

8.5 Non-Factual Clauses

8.6 Verbal Nouns

8.7 Comparing Types of Clauses

8.8 Syntactic Ambiguity

9

Speech Acts

9.1 The Form of Sentences and the Purpose of Utterances

9.2 Analysis of Speech Acts

9.3 Seven Kinds of Speech Acts

9.3.1 Assertive Utterances

9.3.2 Performative Utterances

9.3.3 Verdictive Utterances

9.3.4 Expressive Utterances

9.3.5

Directive Utterances

9.3.6 Commissive Utterances

9.3.7 Four Speech Acts Compared

9.3.8 Phatic Utterances

10 Aspect

10.1 Generic and Specific Predications

10.2 Stative Predicates and Dynamic Predicates

10.3 Durative and Punctual

10.4 Telic and Atelic

10.5 Ingressive, Continuative, Egressive Aspect

10.5.1 Predicates of Location

10.5.2 Predicates of Possession

10.5.3 Predicates of Cognition

10.5.4 Event Predicates

10.5.5 Nouns and Adjectives as Predicates

10.5.6 Aspectual Verbs

10.6 Prospective and

Retrospective

10.7 Some Grammatical Expressions of Aspect

10.7.1 The Prospective

10.7.2 The Perfect or Retrogressive

10.7.3 The Progressive

11 Factivity, Implication, and Modality

11.1 Factivity

11.2 Implicative Predicates

11.3 Modality

12 A

Variety of Predicates

12.1 Attitudinal Predicates

12.2 Enabling and Preventing

12.3 Perceptual Predicates

13 The Semantics of Morphological Relations

13.1 Formal Processes of Derivation

13.2 Semantic Processes in Derivation

13.3 Verbs Formed from

Nouns

13.3.1 Transfer Meanings

13.3.2 Effective Meanings

13.3.3 Instrumental Meanings

13.3.4 Vehicular Meanings

13.4 Verbs from Adjectives

13.5 Verbs from Verbs

13.6 Adjectives Derived from Verbs

13.7 Adjectives Derived from Nouns

13.8 Adjectives

Derived from Adjectives

13.9 Nouns Derived from Verbs

13.10 Nouns Derived from Adjectives

13.11 Nouns Derived from Nouns

Glossary of Technical Terms

Bibliography

Index of Lexemes

Index of Names

Index of Technical Terms

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