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Introducing Human Geographies, Third Edition

Overview

Introducing Human Geographies is the leading guide to human geography for undergraduate students, explaining new thinking on essential topics and discussing exciting developments in the field.

This new edition has been thoroughly revised and updated and coverage is extended with new sections devoted to biogeographies, cartographies, mobilities, non-representational geographies, population geographies, public geographies and securities. Presented in three parts with 60 ...

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Introducing Human Geographies

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Overview

Introducing Human Geographies is the leading guide to human geography for undergraduate students, explaining new thinking on essential topics and discussing exciting developments in the field.

This new edition has been thoroughly revised and updated and coverage is extended with new sections devoted to biogeographies, cartographies, mobilities, non-representational geographies, population geographies, public geographies and securities. Presented in three parts with 60 contributions written by expert international researchers, this text addresses the central ideas through which human geographers understand and shape their subject. Part I: Foundations engages students with key ideas that define human geography’s subject matter and approaches, through critical analyses of dualisms such as local-global, society-space and human-nonhuman. Part II: Themes explores human geography’s main sub-disciplines, with sections devoted to biogeographies, cartographies, cultural geographies, development geographies, economic geographies, environmental geographies, historical geographies, political geographies, population geographies, social geographies, urban and rural geographies. Finally, Part III: Horizons assesses the latest research in innovative areas, from mobilities and securities to non-representational geographies.

This comprehensive, stimulating and cutting edge introduction to the field is richly illustrated throughout with full colour figures, maps and photos. These are available to download on the companion website, located at www.routledge.com/9781444135350.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"A truly wonderful book, vastly wide ranging in its coverage and tremendously exciting in its approach. It is lively, engaging and highly accessible, and provides a thorough grounding for students learning to interpret the world through geographers' eyes. The editors have crafted an indispensable companion for undergraduates setting out on a geographical journey." Jon Shaw, Associate Head, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Plymouth University, UK.

"A substantial expansion of earlier editions, though still a fantastic, progressive, critical introduction to the discipline. The presentation is clear, the writing is wonderfully accessible and the updated selection of themes remains relevant and challenging." Michael Collyer, Senior Lecturer in Geography at the University of Sussex, UK.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781444135350
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 1/7/2014
  • Edition description: Revised
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 1088
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.70 (h) x 1.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul Cloke is Professor of Human Geography at the University of Exeter.

Philip Crang is Professor of Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway, University of London.

Mark Goodwin is Professor of Human Geography and Deputy Vice-Chancellor at the University of Exeter.

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Table of Contents

Part 1 Foundations 1. Local-global Phil Crang 2. Society-space Jo Little 3. Human-non-human Hayden Lorimer 4. Modern-postmodern Mark Goodwin 5. Self-other Paul Cloke 6. Masculinity-femininity Geraldine Pratt & Molly Kraft 7. Science-art David Gilbert 8. Explanation-understanding Rob Kitchin 9. Representation-reality Mike Crang Part 2 Themes Section 1 Biogeographies 10. Nature & human Geography Sarah Whatmore 11. Animals and plants Russell Hitchings 12. Political Ecology Juanita Sundberg & Jessica Dempsey Section 2 Cartography 13. Power of maps Jeremy Crampton 14. Geographical information systems Muki Haklay 15. Counter geographies Wen Lin Section 3 Cultural Geographies 16. Imaginative geographies Felix Driver 17. Place Tim Cresswell 18. Landscape John Wylie 19. Material geographies Philip Crang Section 4 Development Geographies 20. Theories of development Katie Willis 21. Rethinking development Sarah A. Radcliffe 22. Survival & resistance Paul Routledge 23. Human geographies of the Global South Katherine Brickell Section 5 Economic Geographies 24. Spaces of production Kris Olds 25. Money and finance Sarah Hall 26. Consumption-reproduction Juliana Mansvelt 27. Commodities Michael Watts 28. Economic globalization Andrew Jones Section 6 Environmental Geographies 29. Global & local environmental problems Sally Eden 30. Sustainability Mark Whitehead 31. Climate change Harriet Bulkeley Section 7 Historical Geographies 32. Modernity & modernization Miles Ogborn 33. Colonialism & postcolonialism Richard Phillips 34. Space, memory & identity Nuala C. Johnson Section 8 Political Geographies 35. Critical geopolitics Joanne P. Sharp 36. War & peace Scott Kirsch 37. Nationalism Pyrs Gruffudd 38. Citizenship & governance Mark Goodwin Section 9 Population Geographies 39. Age Peter Kraftl 40. Health & well-being David Conradson 41. Migrants & refugees Khalid Koser Section 10 Social Geographies 42. Identities Peter Jackson 43. Identity and difference: dis/ability & sexuality Sarah L. Holloway 44. Exclusion Jon May 45. Diasporas Claire Dwyer Section 11 Urban & rural geographies 46. Urban forms Chris Hamnett 47. Urban senses Lisa Law 48. Rurality Paul Cloke Part 3 Horizons Section 1 Non-representational Geographies 49. Emotion Hester Parr 50. Affect Ben Anderson 51. Performances Amanda Rogers Section 2 Mobilities 52. Mobilities: politics, practices, places Peter Adey 53. Touring mobilities Claudio Minca & Lauren Wagner 54. Virtual mobilities Julia Verne Section 3 Securities 55. Risk/fear/surveillance David Murakami Wood 56. Resources Klauss Dodds 57. Securing life: new hazards & biosecurity Stephen Hincliffe Section 4 Publics 58. How to think about public space Clive Barnett 59. Ethical Spaces Keith Woodward
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