Introducing Joss Stone [B&N Exclusive Version]

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Tracy E. Hopkins
After two critically acclaimed albums and a Gap ad campaign, Joss Stone hardly needs an introduction. So perhaps Introducing Joss Stone is a re-introduction, now that the Brit soul siren has found her artistic identity -- here, she sounds less like a young woman channeling her older idols and more like an original idol in the making. Thanks to her pitch-perfect collaboration with producer and singer-songwriter Raphael Saadiq, Introducing has a sexy, '60s soul-meets-the Love Unlimited Orchestra vibe. And from the look of the inset photo of the psychedelic body-painted duo intertwined, they got along rather well. The disc opens with the jubilant, string-laden "Girl ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Tracy E. Hopkins
After two critically acclaimed albums and a Gap ad campaign, Joss Stone hardly needs an introduction. So perhaps Introducing Joss Stone is a re-introduction, now that the Brit soul siren has found her artistic identity -- here, she sounds less like a young woman channeling her older idols and more like an original idol in the making. Thanks to her pitch-perfect collaboration with producer and singer-songwriter Raphael Saadiq, Introducing has a sexy, '60s soul-meets-the Love Unlimited Orchestra vibe. And from the look of the inset photo of the psychedelic body-painted duo intertwined, they got along rather well. The disc opens with the jubilant, string-laden "Girl They Won't Believe It," but the album doesn't fully come alive until Track 7, the hip-hop-tinged "Music," although a guest appearance by the reclusive Lauryn Hill nearly outshines Stone's smoldering vocals. Amid Saadiq's rapturous soundscape of dizzying stings and percolating bass lines, the newly redheaded singer's powerhouse pipes are golden, notably on the Stevie Wonder-reminiscent "Arms of My Baby," the Donna Summer-esque "Bad Habit," and the doo-wop-and-gospel-inspired "What Were We Thinking." Full of mellifluous melodies and irresistible grooves, this is one meet-and-greet you don't want to miss.
All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Typically, artists dispense with introductions after their debut -- after all, that is an album designed to introduce them to the world -- but neo-soul singer Joss Stone defiantly titled her third album Introducing Joss Stone, thereby dismissing her first two relatively acclaimed albums with one smooth stroke. She now claims that those records were made under record-label pressure -- neatly contradicting the party line that her debut, The Soul Sessions, turned into a retro-soul project after Joss implored her label to ditch the Christina Aguilera-styled urban-pop she was pursuing -- but now as a young adult of 19, she's free to pursue her muse in her own fashion. All this is back-story to Introducing, but Stone makes her modern metamorphosis plain on the album's very first track, where football-star-turned-Hollywood-muscle Vinnie Jones talks about change ("I see change, I embody change, all we do is change, yeah, I know change, we're born to change" and so on and so forth), setting the stage for some surprise -- which "Girl They Won't Believe It" kind of delivers, if only because it isn't all that different from what Stone has done before. It's a sprightly slice of Northern soul propelled by a bouncy Motown beat that doesn't suggest a change in direction as much as a slight shift in aesthetic. Gone are the seasoned studio pros, in are a bevy of big-name producers all united in a mission to make Stone seem a little less like a '60s blue-eyed soul diva and a little more her age, a little more like a modern girl in 2007. So, the professional in-the-pocket grooves have been replaced by drum loops, the warm burnished sound has been ditched in favor of crisp, bright sonics, Harlan Howard covers have been pushed aside for cameos by Common and Lauryn Hill. It's a cosmetic change that works: Introducing does sound brighter, fresher than her other two albums, pitched partway between Amy Winehouse and Back to Basics Christina yet sounding very much like Texas at their prime.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 3/20/2007
  • Label: Virgin Records Us
  • UPC: 094639001224
  • Catalog Number: 90012

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Change (0:35)
  2. 2 Girl They Won't Believe It (3:15)
  3. 3 Headturner (3:16)
  4. 4 Tell Me 'Bout It (2:49)
  5. 5 Tell Me What We're Gonna Do Now (4:22)
  6. 6 Put Your Hands on Me (2:58)
  7. 7 Music (3:41)
  8. 8 Arms of My Baby (2:52)
  9. 9 Bad Habit (3:41)
  10. 10 Proper Nice (3:24)
  11. 11 Bruised But Not Broken (4:15)
  12. 12 Baby Baby Baby (4:35)
  13. 13 What Were We Thinking (4:24)
  14. 14 Music (3:48)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Joss Stone Primary Artist
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A reviewer

    Definitive Joss Stone. This is her hottest album.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    perfect souding

    joss stone's voice is the best thing about this album. the songs are good, but she kicks a** the whole time, especially on tell me what we're gonna do now, music, arms of my baby...i've listened to this album for a week straight now. it really flows well. and i really like the vinnie jones :"

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Delighted but Disapointed

    Joss Stone has been out for a while but is back with her new album "Introducing Joss Stone." This album was very well directed and written in outstandingly professional dialougue. I personal am in love with all of Joss Stone's music and her new album, but I feel she could have done a little better. Joss's album "Mind, Body, and Soul", was better because it was more emotionally driven and more relatable to everyone who listened to it. I didn't hear or really feel as much sadness in the tempo or in the beats this time around. But I still love the album and Joss is a wonderful individual. Joss wrote "Mind, Body, and Soul" when she was sixteen years old and feels like she didn't have as much control over that album in making it her own. In her new album, we really see and hear how she really feels and what she really wants. That's what keeps the listeners interested, when the artist makes the album their own. And Joss has done just that. Anything Joss does can be called perfection because everything she does is professional and personal. That's what the poeple love to hear. This album is a great album and it is deliciously colorful. Don't stop making music anytime soon Joss!

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews