Introduction to 3D Game Engine Design Using DirectX 9 and C#

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Overview

Introduction to 3D Game Engine Design Using DirectX 9 and C# illustrates the process of creating a simple 3D game engine. During this process, author Lynn Harrison demonstrates many facets of the DirectX 9 software through clear-cut explanations and examples.

Throughout the course of the book, you'll develop an off-road driving game that brings such features as management of large scenes, environmental effects, and physics into play. To write the game, you'll use cutting-edge ...

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Overview

Introduction to 3D Game Engine Design Using DirectX 9 and C# illustrates the process of creating a simple 3D game engine. During this process, author Lynn Harrison demonstrates many facets of the DirectX 9 software through clear-cut explanations and examples.

Throughout the course of the book, you'll develop an off-road driving game that brings such features as management of large scenes, environmental effects, and physics into play. To write the game, you'll use cutting-edge technologies—C# and DirectX, and the .NET Framework—and you'll go beyond simple graphics to explore audio, user input, artificial intelligence, and multiplayer design.

Table of Contents

  1. Overview
  2. User Interface
  3. Hanging Ten: A Ride Through the Rendering Pipeline
  4. Basic 3D Objects
  5. Complex 3D Objects
  6. Camera: The Player’s View of the World
  7. Adding Some Atmosphere: Lighting and Fog
  8. Artificial Intelligence: Adding the Competition
  9. Game Audio: Let’s Make Some Noise
  10. Game Physics: Keeping It Real
  11. Tools of the Trade
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590590812
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 8/22/2003
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 424
  • Product dimensions: 7.08 (w) x 9.22 (h) x 1.05 (d)

Meet the Author

Lynn Thomas Harrison is both a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) and Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer (MCSD), and is employed as a senior systems engineer for Diamond Visionics Company, a visualization engineering company. He lives in Binghamton, New York with his wife, Gerri, and son, Michael. Lynn has been active in the simulation and graphics industries for over 22 years.
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Table of Contents

About the Author
About the Technical Reviewer
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Ch. 1 Overview 1
Ch. 2 User Interface 29
Ch. 3 Hanging Ten: A Ride Through the Rendering Pipeline 79
Ch. 4 Basic 3D Objects 113
Ch. 5 Complex 3D Objects 167
Ch. 6 Camera: The Player's View of the World 197
Ch. 7 Adding Some Atmosphere: Lighting and Fog 213
Ch. 8 Artificial Intelligence: Adding the Competition 233
Ch. 9 Game Audio: Let's Make Some Noise 281
Ch. 10 Game Physics: Keeping It Real 303
Ch. 11 Tools of the Trade 383
Index 391
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2004

    Scattered writings and tutorials

    I found this book to be a realy bad example of how a programming book should be organised. When I first read this book I tried to write some of the program classes that were in the first few chapters only to find out that they all relied on classes that will not be discussed untill much later chapters. The organization of this book is horrible, and the game engine that I downloaded off the website doesn't even work. His examples and explinations were also lacking in detail and I found it frustrating trying to find the root of how these funcions and concepts actualy worked.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2004

    Supply and Demand

    I titled this review 'Supply and Demand' because of the huge demand, and very short supply, for books which cover this topic. The lack of a supply is the reason I purchased this book; I simply couldn't find any others. I've been purchasing software books since VB5; this is the first time I've felt strongly enough about the quality of a book that I needed to write a review. My initial thoughts were, if rewritten and $20 cheaper, it might serve as a reference but it isn't an introduction by any means. With this in mind, I downloaded and tried to compile the sample code, as you've already read, it doesn't compile. I then went through the process of finding and downloading the 'revised' code, which does compile, but that's about it; it is filled with bugs. My final synopsis: like the two failed attempts of providing usable code for this book, this book was not properly thought out and rushed into publication. Flags should have been flying when I came across the author, Lynn Harrison, asking members of a forum to please go and post good reviews. If you purchase this book from BN, most likely you'll be buying one that someone returned. I would suggest waiting for others to be published.

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