Introduction to Aristotle / Edition 2

Introduction to Aristotle / Edition 2

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by Aristotle
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0226560325

ISBN-13: 9780226560328

Pub. Date: 02/28/1974

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Includes the complete Posterior Analytics, De Anima, Nichomachean, Ethics, and Poetics with selections from Physics, Metaphysics, and Politics

Overview

Includes the complete Posterior Analytics, De Anima, Nichomachean, Ethics, and Poetics with selections from Physics, Metaphysics, and Politics

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780226560328
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Publication date:
02/28/1974
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
812
Product dimensions:
5.36(w) x 7.83(h) x 1.64(d)

Table of Contents

Preface

General Introduction
The Life and Times of Aristotle
Scientific Method in the Philosophy of Aristotle
Experience, Art, and Science
The Theoretic Sciences
The Practical and Productive Sciences
The Influence of Aristotle

Logic
Introduction
Analytica Posteriora (Posterior Analytics) Complete

Physics
Introduction
Physica (Physics) The Second of the Eight Books

Psychology
Introduction
De Anima (On the Soul) Complete

Biology
Introduction
De Partibus Animalium (On the Parts of Animals) Book 1, Chapter 1

Metaphysics
Introduction
Metaphysica (Metaphysics) The First and Twelfth of the Fourteen Books

Ethics
Introduction
Ethica Nicomachea (Nicomeachean Ethics) Complete

Politics
Introduction
Politica (Politics) The First and Third of the Eight Books

Poetics
Introduction
Poetica (Poetics) Complete

Rhetoric
Introduction
Rhetorica (Rhetoric) Book I, Chapters 1-4, Book II, Chapters 18-22

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Introduction to Aristotle 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Tunguz More than 1 year ago
It's been said somewhere, don't remember by whom, that all of western philosophy is a series of footnotes to Plato and Aristotle. This may be a bit of an exaggeration, but the fact remains that these two seminal figures of western thought have left at least an indirect mark on all of the subsequent thinkers. And yet, it's been my experience that Plato is much more widely read and studied, in college courses and otherwise, than his equally famous erstwhile disciple. This probably has to do a lot with the style: Plato's "Socratic dialogs" have been written in a form that makes them instantly accessible to readers of all ages, and tends to belie the complexities and subtleties of the underlying ideas. Aristotle's style is much more pedantic and scholarly. One could easily see his writings appearing in peer-reviewed journals. In part due to the above considerations, it took me a while to finally pick up a book of Aristotle's writings and try to go through at least some of them. This volume brings a few of his works in their entirety, but for most part only more important excerpts are given. Reading it requires some effort on the part of the reader, especially if you are not used to the style and substance of ancient Greek thought. However, the effort was worthwhile, and I've come away from reading this work with renewed and deepened appreciation for Aristotle. In terms of the sheer breadth of his inquiry, there has not been anyone quite like him before or since.