Introduction to Bioethics / Edition 1

Introduction to Bioethics / Edition 1

by John A. Bryant, Linda Baggott la Velle, John F. Searle, Linda Baggott la Velle
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0470021985

ISBN-13: 9780470021989

Pub. Date: 09/02/2005

Publisher: Wiley

Bryant (biological sciences, U. of Exeter, UK) et al. offer a textbook on ethics for students in the biological, medical, and veterinary sciences, agriculture, and food science fields. They give an overview of ethics in relation to science and society, bioethics, humans and nature, animals, biotechnology, cloning and stem cells, reproductive technology, abortion, and

Overview

Bryant (biological sciences, U. of Exeter, UK) et al. offer a textbook on ethics for students in the biological, medical, and veterinary sciences, agriculture, and food science fields. They give an overview of ethics in relation to science and society, bioethics, humans and nature, animals, biotechnology, cloning and stem cells, reproductive technology, abortion, and euthanasia, with an emphasis on genes, genetic modification, and the Human Genome Project. They also discuss whether a code of ethics is needed and provide a code in the appendix. Annotation © 2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470021989
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
09/02/2005
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
250
Product dimensions:
6.71(w) x 9.72(h) x 0.57(d)

Table of Contents

Preface.

1. Science and Society.

1.1 What's it all about?

1.2 What is science?

1.3 Modern science.

1.4 Science, ethics and values.

1.5 Attitudes to Science.

2. Ethics and Bioethics

2.1 Introduction.

2.2 What is ethics?

2.3 The development of ethics.

2.4 The growth of bioethics.

2.5 Ethics in the 21st century.

2.6 Making ethical decisions.

3. Humans and the Natural World.

3.1 Introduction.

3.2 What's the problem?

3.3 Valuing the environment.

3.4 The place of humans in nature.

3.5 Some thoughts on stewardship.

3.6 Two current themes in environmental ethics.

3.7 Three current issues in environmental ethics.

3.8 Concluding remarks.

4. Humans and Non-human Animals.

4.1 Introduction.

4.2 Humankind's place in the animal kingdom.

4.3 Human use of animals.

4.4 The ethics of animal research.

4.5 Animals in sport, companionship, leisure and fashion.

4.6 Animals for food.

4.7 Conclusion.

5. Biotechnology and Bioethics.

5.1 Introduction.

5.2 General ethical issues related to genetic modification.

5.3 Nano-technology.

5.4 Cybernetics.

6. Applications of Genetic Modification.

6.1 Pharmaceuticals.

6.2 Food and crops.

6.3 Genetic modification of animals.

6.4 Research uses of genetic modification.

7. Human Genes and the Human Genome Project.

7.1 Some history.

7.2 Molecular genetics and the human genome project.

7.3 Some thoughts on eugenics.

7.4 Use of human genetic information.

7.5 Genetic modification of humans - fact or fiction?

8. Genes – the Wider Issues.

8.1 Introduction.

8.2 Crop GM technology, world trade and global justice.

8.3 Gene patenting.

8.4 Genetic piracy.

9. Cloning and Stem Cells.

9.1 Introduction.

9.2 Frogs and sheep.

9.3 Genes and clones.

9.4 It’s not natural – it should be banned!

9.5 The ethics of human cloning - an overview.

9.6 Unlocking the genetic potential of stem cells.

10. The New Reproductive Technologies.

10.1 Introduction.

10.2 Gametes outside the body.

10.3 Techniques of assisted reproductive medicine.

10.4 Designer babies.

10.5 Men and women – do we need both?

10.7 Conclusion.

11. Embryos, Foetuses and Abortion: Issues of Life Before Birth.

11.1 Introduction.

11.2 The early human embryo.

11.3 Embryo research.

11.4 Abortion.

12. Decisions at the End of Life - When May I Die and When Am I Dead?

12.1 Introduction – two important examples.

12.2 How did we get here?

12.3 What is euthanasia?

12.4 The arguments for voluntary euthanasia.

12.5 The arguments against voluntary euthanasia.

12.6 When should medical treatment be withheld or withdrawn?

13. A Code of Ethics for Biologists?

13.1 Introduction.

13.2 The wider responsibilities of a scientist.

13.3 Should there be an ethical code of practice for bioscientists?

Appendix A: Code of Ethics for Bioscience.

Glossary.

Suggestions for Further Reading.

Index.

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