Introduction to Chemicals from Biomass / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $61.25
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 35%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (7) from $61.25   
  • New (5) from $64.01   
  • Used (2) from $61.24   

Overview

Introduction to Chemicals from Biomass, Second Edition presents an overview of the use of biorenewable resources in the 21st century for the manufacture of chemical products, materials and energy. The book demonstrates that biomass is essentially a rich mixture of chemicals and materials and, as such, has a tremendous potential as feedstock for making a wide range of chemicals and materials with applications in industries from pharmaceuticals to furniture.

Completely revised and updated to reflect recent developments, this new edition begins with an introduction to the biorefinery concept, followed by chapters addressing the various types of available biomass feedstocks, including waste, and the different pre-treatment and processing technologies being developed to turn these feedstocks into platform chemicals, polymers, materials and energy. The book concludes with a discussion on the policies and strategies being put in place for delivering the so-called Bioeconomy.

Introduction to Chemicals from Biomass is a valuable resource for academics, industrial scientists and policy-makers working in the areas of industrial biotechnology, biorenewables, chemical engineering, fine and bulk chemical production, agriculture technologies, plant science, and energy and power generation.

We need to reduce our dependence on fossil resources and increasingly derive all the chemicals we take for granted and use in our daily life from biomass – and we must make sure that we do this using green chemistry and sustainable technologies!

For more information on the Wiley Series in Renewable Resources, visit www.wiley.com/go/rrs

Topics covered include:

• The biorefinery concept
• Biomass feedstocks
• Pre-treatment technologies
• Platform molecules from renewable resources
• Polymers from bio-based monomers
• Biomaterials
• Bio-based energy production


Praise for the 1st edition:

“Drawing on the expertise of the authors the book involves a degree of plant biology and chemical engineering, which illustrates the multidisciplinary nature of the topic beautifully” - Chemistry World

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"[The book] provides a thorough introduction to this fast moving sector. The authors include a wide variety of accesible definitions.... Overall I found the book very readable and would recommend it to anyone wishing to learn about the benefits of microreactor technology." (Chemistry World, March 2009)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470058053
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 9/29/2008
  • Series: Wiley Series in Renewable Resource Series , #9
  • Edition description: New
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 198
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Contributors xi

Series Preface xiii

Preface xv

1 The Biorefinery Concept: An Integrated Approach 1
James Clark and Fabien Deswarte

1.1 Sustainability for the Twenty-First Century 1

1.2 Renewable Resources: Nature and Availability 2

1.3 The Challenge of Waste 4

1.3.1 Waste Policy and Waste Valorisation 6

1.3.2 The Food Supply Chain Waste Opportunity 7

1.3.3 Case Study: Citrus Waste 8

1.4 Green Chemistry 9

1.5 The Biorefinery Concept 11

1.5.1 Definition 11

1.5.2 Different Types of Biorefinery 12

1.5.3 Challenges and Opportunities 20

1.5.4 Biorefinery Size 24

1.6 Conclusions 24

1.7 Acknowledgement 25

References 25

2 Biomass as a Feedstock 31
Thomas M. Attard, Andrew J. Hunt, Avtar S. Matharu, Joseph A. Houghton and Igor Polikarpov

2.1 Introduction 31

2.2 Lignocellulosic Biomass 32

2.3 Food Supply Chain Waste 40

2.4 Mango Waste: A Case Study 44

2.5 Concluding Remarks 46

References 47

3 Pretreatment and Thermochemical and Biological Processing of Biomass 53
Wan Chi Lam, Tsz Him Kwan, Vitaliy L. Budarin, Egid B. Mubofu, Jiajun Fan and Carol Sze Ki Lin

3.1 Introduction 53

3.2 Biomass Pretreatments 54

3.2.1 Mechanical Pretreatment of Biomass 54

3.2.2 Physical Pretreatment of Biomass 57

3.2.3 Chemical Pretreatment of Biomass 60

3.2.4 Microwave-Assisted Hydrothermal Biomass Treatment 63

3.2.5 Biological Pretreatment 65

3.2.6 Summary 66

3.3 Thermochemical Processing of Biomass 66

3.3.1 Direct Liquefaction 66

3.3.2 Direct Combustion 70

3.3.3 Gasification 72

3.3.4 Pyrolysis 73

3.3.5 Torrefaction 74

3.4 Biological Processing 78

3.4.1 Fermentation 78

3.4.2 Anaerobic Digestion 79

3.5 Summary 83

References 83

4 Platform Molecules 89
Thomas J. Farmer and Mark Mascal

4.1 Introduction 89

4.2 Fossil-Derived Base Chemicals 91

4.3 Definition of a Platform Molecule 93

4.4 Where Platform Molecules Come From 96

4.4.1 Saccharides 97

4.4.2 Lignin 103

4.4.3 Protein 105

4.4.4 Extracts 109

4.5 Process Technologies: Biomass to Platform Molecules 114

4.6 Bio-Derived v. Fossil-Derived: Changing Downstream Chemistry 117

4.7 List of Platform Molecules 119

4.8 Example Platform Molecules 130

4.8.1 Synthesis Gas Platform: Thermal Treatment 130

4.8.2 5-(Chloromethyl)furfural: Chemical-Catalytic Treatment 133

4.8.3 n-Butanol (Biobutanol): Biological Treatment 135

4.8.4 Triglyceride Platform: Extraction 137

4.9 Conclusion 142

References 143

5 Monomers and Resulting Polymers from Biomass 157
James A. Bergman and Michael R. Kessler

5.1 Introduction 157

5.2 Polymers from Vegetable Oils 159

5.2.1 Isolation of Vegetable Oil 163

5.2.2 Thermosets of Vegetable Oils and Comonomers 163

5.2.3 Epoxidized and Acrylated Epoxidized Vegetable Oil 164

5.2.4 Polyurethanes from Vegetable Oil 165

5.2.5 Polyesters 167

5.2.6 Polyamides 168

5.2.7 Vegetable Oil Conclusion 168

5.3 Furan Chemistry 169

5.3.1 Production of Furfural and HMF 169

5.3.2 Second-Generation Derivatives 171

5.3.3 Addition Polymerizations 171

5.3.4 Furfuryl Alcohol 172

5.3.5 Polyesters 172

5.3.6 Polyamides 173

5.3.7 Other Polymers 175

5.3.8 Furan Conclusion 176

5.4 Terpenes 176

5.4.1 Production of Turpentine 177

5.4.2 Cationic Polymerization of Pinenes 178

5.4.3 Copolymerization of Pinenes 178

5.4.4 Polymerization of Non-Pinene Terpenes 179

5.4.5 Terpenoids 180

5.4.6 Terpene Conclusion 181

5.5 Rosin 181

5.5.1 Production and Chemistry of Rosin 181

5.5.2 Epoxy Resins from Rosin 183

5.5.3 Polyesters and Polyurethanes from Rosin 184

5.5.4 Thermoplastic Polymers from Rosin: Controlled Radical Techniques 184

5.5.5 Rosin Conclusion 185

5.6 The Potential of Tannins 186

5.6.1 Recent Work with Tannin Polycondensation 187

5.6.2 Tannins Conclusion 189

5.7 Alpha-Hydroxy Acids 189

5.7.1 Production of PLA 190

5.7.2 Properties of PLA 192

5.7.3 Applications of PLA 193

5.8 Conclusion 193

References 193

6 Bio-based Materials 205
Antoine Rouilly and Carlos Vaca-Garcia

6.1 Introduction 205

6.2 Wood and Natural Fibres 206

6.2.1 Molecular Constitution 206

6.2.2 Hierarchical Structure of Wood and Timber 208

6.2.3 Plant Fibres 214

6.3 Isolated and Modified Biopolymers as Biomaterials 219

6.3.1 Cellulose 220

6.3.2 Cellulose Derivatives 224

6.3.3 Starch 228

6.3.4 Starch Derivatives 230

6.3.5 Chitin and Chitosan 230

6.3.6 Proteins 231

6.4 Agromaterials, Blends and Composites 236

6.4.1 Agromaterials 236

6.4.2 Blends of Synthetic Polymers and Starch 239

6.4.3 Composites with Natural Fibres 240

6.4.4 Wood-Based Boards 243

6.4.5 Materials for Construction 244

6.5 Conclusion 245

References 245

7 Biomass-Based Energy Production 249
Mehrdad Arshadi and Anita Sellstedt

7.1 Introduction 249

7.2 Physical Upgrading Processes 250

7.2.1 Refinement of Biomass into Solid Fuels 250

7.2.2 Wood Powder 250

7.2.3 Briquette Production 251

7.2.4 Pellet Production 252

7.2.5 Storage of Solid Biomass 255

7.2.6 Torrefaction Technology 256

7.3 Microbiological Processes 257

7.3.1 Organisms and Processes 257

7.3.2 Hydrogen Production 257

7.3.3 Classification of Hydrogen-Forming Processes 258

7.3.4 Butanol Production Using Bacteria as Biocatalysts 259

7.3.5 Microbiological Ethanol Production 260

7.3.6 Production of Biodiesel from Plants and Algae 262

7.3.7 Biogas Production 263

7.4 Thermochemical Processes 265

7.4.1 Thermal Processing Equipment 266

7.4.2 Gasification 269

7.4.3 Pyrolysis 271

7.4.4 Liquefaction 272

7.4.5 Combustion 273

7.5 Chemical Processes 274

7.5.1 Dimethyl Ether (DME) 274

7.5.2 Biodiesel 274

7.6 Primary Alcohols 276

7.6.1 Methanol 276

7.6.2 Ethanol 277

7.6.3 Butanol 280

7.7 Conclusions 280

References 281

8 Policies and Strategies for Delivering a Sustainable Bioeconomy: A European Perspective 285
David Turley

8.1 Introduction 285

8.2 Drivers for Change 287

8.3 The Starting Point: Strategies for Change 288

8.4 Direct Measures 289

8.4.1 Integrated Development 290

8.4.2 Policy Mechanisms 291

8.4.3 Preferential Purchasing Policies 293

8.5 Supporting Measures 294

8.5.1 Supply-Side Drivers 294

8.5.2 Demand-Side Drivers 297

8.6 Bioeconomy Definitions 298

8.6.1 Biobased Content 298

8.6.2 Biodegradability 301

8.6.3 Composting Standards 302

8.6.4 Material Recycling 303

8.7 Life-Cycle Analysis 303

8.8 Ecolabels 304

8.9 Concluding Remarks 307

References 308

Index 311

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)