Introduction to Clinical Skills: A Patient-Centered Textbook / Edition 1

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Overview

This practical text is an excellent introduction to the clinical skills all physicians, particularly those in primary care disciplines, need to treat their patients in a humane fashion and at a reasonable cost. The authors focus on patient-centered, or generalist, skills that will help the biomedically oriented physician become more comfortable in managing patient care situations. In addition, the chapters review the diagnostic, treatment, and technical skills that medical students encountered in their Introduction to Clinical Medicine or Physical Diagnosis courses. The book's clinical cases will stimulate class discussions and provide vignettes for skills practice.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Isaac Kleinman, MD (Baylor College of Medicine)
Description: This is a text of 23 chapters in four sections: (1) a review of the typical skills taught in the dominant biomedical approach followed by a chapter contrasting it with a more patient-centered or systemic approach; (2) a discussion of traditional history taking and examining skills and use of the laboratory; (3) improvement of skills in decision making, patient education, counseling, and management of patients with chronic illness; (4) achieving a program for development of a personal lifelong learning program and skills in teaching, research, and development of clinical guidelines.
Purpose: It is designed as an introductory text focusing on skills beyond the routine diagnostic, treatment, and technical skills that are useful in achieving optimal patient outcomes.
Audience: It is designed for an audience of students, residents, and primary care practitioners.
Features: There are good introductions to a wide range of topics, including geriatric assessment, patient education, and the impact of illness on the family and the community. Each chapter is followed by one or more case studies with pertinent questions. An unusual feature are the chapters on personal professional development, in teaching and research, and the development of an approach to lifelong learning. The number of topics makes for chapters too brief for the material to be covered. One could wish for a little longer book in this regard. However, there are many references. Some of the chapters on psychosocial medicine suffer from an excess of jargon, especially in view of the fact that this is an introductory text. A glossary might have helped. Although the case studies would be useful for group discussion, they are not as effective for individual study as they would be had answers and discussion of answers been supplied. An additional section for that purpose, or a comparison answer and discussion book, would have been helpful.
Assessment: Among the many new texts on primary care, this one serves well as an introduction to all the main topics of systemic medicine. The references are numerous and more current than most similar texts. The authors are knowledgeable. The text does well what it purports to do: provide an introduction to the myriad clinical and patient management skills required of a good primary care physician, many of which are not well taught in medical school and residency.
Isaac Kleinman
This is a text of 23 chapters in four sections: (1) a review of the typical skills taught in the dominant biomedical approach followed by a chapter contrasting it with a more patient-centered or systemic approach; (2) a discussion of traditional history taking and examining skills and use of the laboratory; (3) improvement of skills in decision making, patient education, counseling, and management of patients with chronic illness; (4) achieving a program for development of a personal lifelong learning program and skills in teaching, research, and development of clinical guidelines. It is designed as an introductory text focusing on skills beyond the routine diagnostic, treatment, and technical skills that are useful in achieving optimal patient outcomes. It is designed for an audience of students, residents, and primary care practitioners. There are good introductions to a wide range of topics, including geriatric assessment, patient education, and the impact of illness on the family and the community. Each chapter is followed by one or more case studies with pertinent questions. An unusual feature are the chapters on personal professional development, in teaching and research, and the development of an approach to lifelong learning. The number of topics makes for chapters too brief for the material to be covered. One could wish for a little longer book in this regard. However, there are many references. Some of the chapters on psychosocial medicine suffer from an excess of jargon, especially in view of the fact that this is an introductory text. A glossary might have helped. Although the case studies would be useful for group discussion, they are not as effective for individualstudy as they would be had answers and discussion of answers been supplied. An additional section for that purpose, or a comparison answer and discussion book, would have been helpful. Among the many new texts on primary care, this one serves well as an introduction to all the main topics of systemic medicine. The references are numerous and more current than most similar texts. The authors are knowledgeable. The text does well what it purports to do: provide an introduction to the myriad clinical and patient management skills required of a good primary care physician, many of which are not well taught in medical school and residency.
Booknews
Mengel Tufts University School of Medicine and Fields Oregon Health Sciences University unite cost-efficiency and compassion in their presentation of patient-centered skills. The description of these skills is organized into four sections which explore the contrast between the biomedical approach and a patient-centered outlook; basic clinical skills such as interviewing, physical examination, and diagnosis; and new approaches to improve decision making, patient education, chronic illness management, counseling and disease reduction. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780306453502
  • Publisher: Springer US
  • Publication date: 12/31/1996
  • Edition description: 1997
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 519
  • Product dimensions: 1.13 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 7.00 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction. Systemic Patient-Centered Care; M.B. Mengel. Foundations of Clinical Expertise. Interviewing; K. Zoppi. Physical Examination; D. Elliot, L. Goldbert. Appropriate Use of Laboratory Tests; V. Johnson. Making a Diagnosis; J. Langlois. Instituting Treatment; J. Susman. Record Keeping and Presentation; W. Chop. Improving Clinical Experience. The Difficult Clinical Interview; K. Zoppi, C.P. McKegney. Clinical Decision Making; F. Lawlor, R.M. Hamm. Patient Education; E. Beck. Negotiation with Patients; J. South-Paul. Managing Chronic Illness; J. Rolland. Counseling and Behavioral Change;L. Mauksch. Functional Assessment of the Patient; K. Farrell. Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; L. Dickey. Critical Appraisal of the Literature; W. Newton. Reducing Malpractice Risk; R. Roberts. Managing a Critical Practice; R.M. Johnson. Life-Long Medical Learning; S.J.S. Crandall. Advancing the Discipline of Medicine. The Art and Science of Medical Teaching; R. Arseneau, D. Pratt. Medical Research; D.A. Katerndahl. Development of Clinical Guidelines; J. Moy. Index.
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