Introduction to Engineering Analysis / Edition 4

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$14.41
(Save 81%)
Est. Return Date: 05/01/2015
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $29.54
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 61%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (16) from $29.54   
  • New (11) from $69.78   
  • Used (5) from $29.54   

Overview

For use in the first-year engineering course. This text is also suitable for individuals interested in adopting a problem-solving approach to engineering problems.

The goal of this text is to introduce a general problem-solving approach for the beginning engineering student. Thus, Introduction to Engineering Analysis focuses on how to solve (any) kind of engineering analytical problem in a logical and systematic way. The book helps to prepare the students for such analytically oriented courses as statics, strength of materials, electrical circuits, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, etc.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780133485080
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 8/30/2013
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 289,574
  • Product dimensions: 7.90 (w) x 9.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

What is analysis? A dictionary definition of analysis might read something like this:

Separation of a whole into its component parts.
An examination of a complex system, its elements,
and their relationships.


Based on this general definition, analysis may refer to everything from the study of a person's mental state (psychoanalysis) to the determination of the amount of certain elements in an unknown metal alloy (elemental analysis). Engineering analysis, however, has a specific meaning. A concise working definition of engineering analysis is

Analytical solution of an engineering problem
using mathematics and principles of science.


Engineering analysis relies heavily on basic mathematics such as algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, and statistics. Higher-level mathematics such as linear algebra, differential equations and complex variables may also be used. Principles and laws from the physical sciences, particularly physics and chemistry, are key ingredients of engineering analysis.

Engineering analysis involves more than searching for an equation that fits a problem, plugging numbers into the ation, and "turning the crank" to generate an answer. It not a simple "plug and chug" procedure. Engineering analysis requires logical and systematic thinking about the engineering problem. The engineer must first be able to state the problem clearly, logically, and concisely. The engineer must understand the physical behavior of the system being analyzed and know which scientific principles to apply. He or shemust recognize which mathematical tools to use and how to implement them by hand or on a computer. The engineer must then be able to generate a solution that is consistent with the stated problem and any simplifying assumptions. The engineer must then ascertain that the solution is reasonable and contains no errors.

Engineering analysis may be regarded as a type of modeling or simulation. For example, suppose that a civil engineer wants to know the tensile stress in a cable of a suspension bridge that is being designed. The bridge exists only on paper, so a direct stress measurement cannot be made. A scale model of the bridge could be constructed, and a stress measurement taken on the model, but models are expensive and very time-consuming to develop. A better approach is to create an analytical model of the bridge or a portion of the bridge containing the cable. From this model, the tensile stress can be calculated.

Engineering courses such as statics, dynamics, strength of materials, thermodynamics, and electrical circuits that focus on analysis are considered core courses in the engineering curriculum. Because you will be taking many of these courses, it is vital that you gain a fundamental understanding of what analysis is and, more importantly, how to do analysis properly. As the bridge example illustrates, analysis is an integral part of engineering design. Analysis is also a key part of the study of engineering failures.

Engineers who perform engineering analyses on a regular basis are referred to as engineering analysts or analytic engineers. These functional titles are used to differentiate analysis from the other engineering functions such as research and development (R&D), design, testing, production, sales, marketing, etc. In some engineering companies, clear distinctions are made between the various engineering functions and the people who work in them. Depending on the organizational structure and the type of products involved, large companies may dedicate a separate department or group of engineers as analysts. Engineers whose work is dedicated to analysis are considered specialists. In this capacity, the engineering analyst usually works in a support role for design engineering. It is not uncommon, however, for design and analysis functions to be combined in a single department because design and analysis are so closely related. In small firms that employ only a few engineers, the engineers often bear the responsibility of many technical functions, including analysis.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 The Role of Analysis in Engineering 1

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Analysis and Engineering Design 4

1.3 Analysis and Engineering Failure 7

Chapter 2 Dimensions and Units 15

2.1 Introduction 15

2.2 Dimensions 16

2.3 Units 20

2.4 SI Units 25

2.5 English Units 32

2.6 Mass and Weight 35

2.7 Unit Conversions 41

Chapter 3 Analysis Methodology 51

3.1 Introduction 51

3.2 Numerical Calculations 52

3.2.1 Approximations 53

3.2.2 Significant Figures 54

3.3 General Analysis Procedure 61

3.4 The Computer as an Analysis Tool 77

3.4.1 Spreadsheets 78

3.4.2 Equation Solvers and Mathematics Software 80

3.4.3 Programming Languages 80

3.4.4 Specialty Software 82

3.4.5 Finite Element Software 82

Chapter 4 Mechanics 91

4.1 Introduction 91

4.2 Scalars and Vectors 94

4.2.1 Vector Operations 96

4.2.2 Vector Components 97

4.2.3 Unit Vectors 99

4.3 Forces 103

4.4 Free-Body Diagrams 110

Procedure for Constructing Free-Body Diagrams 110

4.5 Equilibrium 116

4.6 Stress and Strain 123

4.6.1 Stress 124

4.6.2 Strain 125

4.6.3 Hooke’s Law 126

4.6.4 Stress—Strain Diagram 127

4.7 Design Stress 131

Chapter 5 Electrical Circuits 145

5.1 Introduction 145

5.2 Electric Charge And Current 147

5.3 Voltage 155

5.4 Resistance 158

5.5 Ohm’S Law 162

5.6 Simple DC Circuits 165

5.7 Kirchhoff’s Laws 172

5.7.1 Kirchhoff’s Current Law 172

5.7.2 Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law 173

Chapter 6 Thermodynamics 185

6.1 Introduction 185

6.2 Pressure and Temperature 186

6.2.1 Pressure 187

6.2.2 Temperature 189

6.3 Forms of Energy 193

6.3.1 Potential Energy 194

6.3.2 Kinetic Energy 195

6.3.3 Internal Energy 195

6.3.4 Total Energy 196

6.4 Work and Heat 198

6.4.1 Mechanical Work 199

6.4.2 Heat 203

6.5 The First Law of Thermodynamics 207

6.6 Heat Engines 214

6.7 The Second Law of Thermodynamics 217

Chapter 7 Fluid Mechanics 227

7.1 Introduction 227

7.2 Fluid Properties 230

7.2.1 Density, Specific Weight, and Specific Gravity 230

7.2.2 Bulk Modulus 233

7.2.3 Viscosity 234

7.3 Fluid Statics 239

7.3.1 Pressure—Elevation Relationship 239

7.3.2 Forces on Submerged Surfaces 241

7.4 Flow Rates 243

7.5 Conservation of Mass 246

Chapter 8 Renewable Energy 258

8.1 Introduction 258

8.1.1 Environmental Considerations 260

8.2 Solar 261

8.2.1 Solar Energy Systems 262

8.2.2 Photovoltaic Systems 265

8.3 Wind 274

8.3.1 Basic Energy Analysis of a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine 278

8.4 Hydro 281

8.4.1 Basic Energy Analysis of a Hydropower Plant 283

8.5 Geothermal 285

8.5.1 Basic Energy Analysis of a Binary Plant 286

8.6 Marine 290

8.6.1 Tidal 290

8.6.2 Ocean 291

8.6.2.2 Ocean Waves 292

8.7 Biomass 296

Chapter 9 Data Analysis: Graphing 302

9.1 Introduction 302

9.2 Collecting and Recording Data 305

9.2.1 Data Identification and Association 305

9.2.2 Accuracy, Precision, and Error 306

9.2.3 Recording Data 310

9.3 General Graphing Procedure 312

9.3.1 Dependent and Independent Variables 314

9.3.2 Variable Ranges 315

9.3.3 Graph Paper 315

9.3.4 Location of Axes 316

9.3.5 Graduation and Calibration of Axes 317

9.3.6 Axis Labels 320

9.3.7 Data Point Plotting 321

9.3.8 Curves 322

9.3.9 Legends and Titles 324

9.3.10 Graphing with Computer Software 324

9.4 Curve Fitting 328

9.4.1 Common Mathematical Functions 329

9.4.2 Method of Selected Points 330

9.4.3 Least Squares Linear Regression 337

9.5 Interpolation and Extrapolation 341

Chapter 10 Data Analysis: Statistics 355

10.1 Introduction 356

10.2 Data Classification and Frequency Distribution 357

Data Classification Guidelines 358

10.3 Measures of Central Tendency 361

10.3.1 Mean 361

10.3.2 Median 362

10.3.3 Mode 365

10.4 Measures of Variation 365

10.5 Normal Distribution 368

Appendix

Index

Read More Show Less

Preface

PREFACE:

What is analysis? A dictionary definition of analysis might read something like this:

Separation of a whole into its component parts.
An examination of a complex system, its elements,
and their relationships.


Based on this general definition, analysis may refer to everything from the study of a person's mental state (psychoanalysis) to the determination of the amount of certain elements in an unknown metal alloy (elemental analysis). Engineering analysis, however, has a specific meaning. A concise working definition of engineering analysis is

Analytical solution of an engineering problem
using mathematics and principles of science.


Engineering analysis relies heavily on basic mathematics such as algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, and statistics. Higher-level mathematics such as linear algebra, differential equations and complex variables may also be used. Principles and laws from the physical sciences, particularly physics and chemistry, are key ingredients of engineering analysis.

Engineering analysis involves more than searching for an equation that fits a problem, plugging numbers into the ation, and "turning the crank" to generate an answer. It not a simple "plug and chug" procedure. Engineering analysis requires logical and systematic thinking about the engineering problem. The engineer must first be able to state the problem clearly, logically, and concisely. The engineer must understand the physical behavior of the system being analyzed and know which scientific principles to apply. He orshemust recognize which mathematical tools to use and how to implement them by hand or on a computer. The engineer must then be able to generate a solution that is consistent with the stated problem and any simplifying assumptions. The engineer must then ascertain that the solution is reasonable and contains no errors.

Engineering analysis may be regarded as a type of modeling or simulation. For example, suppose that a civil engineer wants to know the tensile stress in a cable of a suspension bridge that is being designed. The bridge exists only on paper, so a direct stress measurement cannot be made. A scale model of the bridge could be constructed, and a stress measurement taken on the model, but models are expensive and very time-consuming to develop. A better approach is to create an analytical model of the bridge or a portion of the bridge containing the cable. From this model, the tensile stress can be calculated.

Engineering courses such as statics, dynamics, strength of materials, thermodynamics, and electrical circuits that focus on analysis are considered core courses in the engineering curriculum. Because you will be taking many of these courses, it is vital that you gain a fundamental understanding of what analysis is and, more importantly, how to do analysis properly. As the bridge example illustrates, analysis is an integral part of engineering design. Analysis is also a key part of the study of engineering failures.

Engineers who perform engineering analyses on a regular basis are referred to as engineering analysts or analytic engineers. These functional titles are used to differentiate analysis from the other engineering functions such as research and development (R&D), design, testing, production, sales, marketing, etc. In some engineering companies, clear distinctions are made between the various engineering functions and the people who work in them. Depending on the organizational structure and the type of products involved, large companies may dedicate a separate department or group of engineers as analysts. Engineers whose work is dedicated to analysis are considered specialists. In this capacity, the engineering analyst usually works in a support role for design engineering. It is not uncommon, however, for design and analysis functions to be combined in a single department because design and analysis are so closely related. In small firms that employ only a few engineers, the engineers often bear the responsibility of many technical functions, including analysis.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

What is analysis? A dictionary definition of analysis might read something like this:

Separation of a whole into its component parts.
An examination of a complex system, its elements,
and their relationships.


Based on this general definition, analysis may refer to everything from the study of a person's mental state (psychoanalysis) to the determination of the amount of certain elements in an unknown metal alloy (elemental analysis). Engineering analysis, however, has a specific meaning. A concise working definition of engineering analysis is

Analytical solution of an engineering problem
using mathematics and principles of science.


Engineering analysis relies heavily on basic mathematics such as algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, and statistics. Higher-level mathematics such as linear algebra, differential equations and complex variables may also be used. Principles and laws from the physical sciences, particularly physics and chemistry, are key ingredients of engineering analysis.

Engineering analysis involves more than searching for an equation that fits a problem, plugging numbers into the ation, and "turning the crank" to generate an answer. It not a simple "plug and chug" procedure. Engineering analysis requires logical and systematic thinking about the engineering problem. The engineer must first be able to state the problem clearly, logically, and concisely. The engineer must understand the physical behavior of the system being analyzed and know which scientific principles to apply. He or she mustrecognize which mathematical tools to use and how to implement them by hand or on a computer. The engineer must then be able to generate a solution that is consistent with the stated problem and any simplifying assumptions. The engineer must then ascertain that the solution is reasonable and contains no errors.

Engineering analysis may be regarded as a type of modeling or simulation. For example, suppose that a civil engineer wants to know the tensile stress in a cable of a suspension bridge that is being designed. The bridge exists only on paper, so a direct stress measurement cannot be made. A scale model of the bridge could be constructed, and a stress measurement taken on the model, but models are expensive and very time-consuming to develop. A better approach is to create an analytical model of the bridge or a portion of the bridge containing the cable. From this model, the tensile stress can be calculated.

Engineering courses such as statics, dynamics, strength of materials, thermodynamics, and electrical circuits that focus on analysis are considered core courses in the engineering curriculum. Because you will be taking many of these courses, it is vital that you gain a fundamental understanding of what analysis is and, more importantly, how to do analysis properly. As the bridge example illustrates, analysis is an integral part of engineering design. Analysis is also a key part of the study of engineering failures.

Engineers who perform engineering analyses on a regular basis are referred to as engineering analysts or analytic engineers. These functional titles are used to differentiate analysis from the other engineering functions such as research and development (R&D), design, testing, production, sales, marketing, etc. In some engineering companies, clear distinctions are made between the various engineering functions and the people who work in them. Depending on the organizational structure and the type of products involved, large companies may dedicate a separate department or group of engineers as analysts. Engineers whose work is dedicated to analysis are considered specialists. In this capacity, the engineering analyst usually works in a support role for design engineering. It is not uncommon, however, for design and analysis functions to be combined in a single department because design and analysis are so closely related. In small firms that employ only a few engineers, the engineers often bear the responsibility of many technical functions, including analysis.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)