Introduction to Engineering Technology / Edition 6

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Overview

This new edition of Introduction to Engineering Technology explains the responsibilities of technicians and technologists in the dynamic world of engineering. The basic tools of engineering technology, including problem solving, calculator skills, conversion of units, geometry, computer skills, and technical reporting, are explained.

Important mathematical concepts are presented in a moderately-paced manner so they may be easily learned. In fact, this is the only introductory engineering text that presents practical, worked-out examples for the engineering calculator. The presentation is also designed to motivate the reader to acquire more sophisticated skills in algebra, trigonometry, and geometry. Most importantly, this popular text helps readers to understand the broad spectrum of today's technologies, preparing them for future technical courses.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131115033
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 5/18/2004
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 6
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 7.52 (w) x 9.14 (h) x 0.83 (d)

Meet the Author

Jeffrey L. Rankinen is an associate professor at the Pennsylvania College of Technology in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. He is a member of the Electronics and Computer Engineering Technology department. Jeff teaches basic electronics courses, while his specialty areas include optical communications and nanotechnology. In addition to teaching credit courses, Jeff is a Tyco Electronics AMP NETCONNECT instructor for the AMP ACT 1 and ACT 2 certification courses in premises cabling systems. He also actively consults for local industry in the area of fiber optic installation and repair. His educational credentials include a Ph.D. from the Pennsylvania State University in Materials, an M.S. from the Pennsylvania State University in Electrical Engineering, a B.S. from the Rochester Institute of Technology in Electrical Engineering and A.A.S. degrees in electronics and computer science from the Pennsylvania College of Technology.

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Table of Contents

1 Engineering Technology as a Career 1
2 Career Choices in the Engineering Technologies 24
3 Survival Skills - Preparing for the Engineering Technologies 46
4 The Calculator 71
5 Measurement Systems 101
6 Right-Triangle Trigonometry and Geometry for Technologists 135
7 The Technical Laboratory 171
8 Microcomputers and Personal Computers 208
9 Programming and Industrial Automation 243
10 Your Future in Technology 274
Appendix A - Professional Organizations in Engineering 307
Appendix B - Algebraic Rules 308
Appendix C - Trigonometry 311
Appendix D - Beginning BASIC Commands and Reserved Words 314
Appendix E - Selected Computer Languages 316
Appendix F - Glossary of Abbreviations and Acronyms 318
Answers to Odd-Numbered Problems 320
Index 329
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Preface

Graduates of 2- and 4-year technical programs will become society's implementors, those who transform concepts into reality. They must combine a practical understanding of materials, machinery, and processes with the theories of today's practicing engineer. Graduates will work on the cutting edge of technology, installing, operating, and maintaining new equipment in manufacturing and service industries. The implementors will be needed by society, challenged by their careers, and rewarded by their successes. This book is for them.

Changes in the Fifth Edition

The most extensive improvements in the fifth edition of Introduction to Engineering Technology are

  • Employment and salary information, as well as occupational information, has been updated.
  • Financial problem solving .has been added to the Problem Solving Section in Chapter 3.
  • Technological advances since the fourth edition have been added. Data on graphing calculators (e.g., the TI-86) have been updated in Chapter 4. All computer information has been updated.
  • Chapter 8 has been radically altered to afford the student the information needed to build a home computer. The material in the first two sections of Chapter 9 has been replaced with three new sections on computer networks and using the Internet.
  • New figures and photos have been added to clarify the concepts presented.
  • Both students and instructors will benefit from the added number of homework problems. Web search problems have been added to all chapters. Specific website addresses may change, so instructors and students should learn to depend on search engines, such as Yahoo, Lycos,Altavista, and Goto.com.

To the Student

Today, the key to survival—for all nations—is to have an adequate number of technicians and technologists to produce, install, and maintain state-of-the-art equipment, train and supervise industry's skilled workers, and support research and development efforts. This book's holistic approach will help those of you seeking to become society's implementors receive a quality education. It will allow you to answer these questions:

  • Am I suited for a career in technology?
  • What tools do I need to be successful?
  • How will I apply these tools in business and industry?

This text will present an overall picture of the engineering world with the technician's and technologist's places in it. It stresses the importance of possessing a good attitude and paying close attention to detail. It also provides you with the opportunity to use the language and tools of the math-sciences. The language and tools this book presents are those you will need to be successful in the real world of business and industry. I encourage you to sharpen your problem-solving abilities by working the problems at the ends of the chapters. The answers to the odd-numbered problems are at the back of this text.

To the Instructor

The text material has been used in the classroom and has worked well for my two-year college students. Students without a strong mathematics and science background can learn from the material: Appendices B and C review the mathematical principles necessary to understand the text. Introduction to Engineering Technology may be used as the primary text for Orientation to Engineering Technology courses or as a supplement for courses requiring the use of applied mathematics, computers, or scientific calculators.

The text also may be used in secondary school technical preparatory (tech prep) programs. Dale Parnell's popular book The Neglected Majority discusses the need for more structured mathematics and science education for the "middle fifty percent of any high school's student body." This text provides a vital practical base to support such a structured approach.

This book contains numerous practical applications to enhance understanding of the concepts discussed. Students wish to work with current applications (e.g., graphing calculators in Chapter 4 and ladder diagrams in Chapter 9) as well as learn the basics. I encourage you to discuss the applications in class, as well as to discuss your own problem-solving experiences.

Introduction to Engineering Technology, Fifth Edition, is supported by a complete instructor's manual, containing performance objectives for each chapter, suggested class activities, transparency masters, and worked-out solutions to all problems.

Organization

Chapters 1 and 2 contain a brief history of engineering and career information for technicians and technologists. Career information includes such topics as the role of the technologist, the need for good communication skills and teamwork, and potential salary information for the future. Major technologies discussed are Chemical, Civil, Architectural, Electrical/Electronic, Computer, Industrial, and Mechanical. Chapter 3 covers college survival skills—using the technical library, maintaining good grades, scheduling adequate study time, and applying basic problem-solving skills. Resume writing, interviewing techniques, and looking ahead to graduation prepare students for their ultimate goal—gaining desirable employment. Membership in a professional society is recommended. Appendix A provides a listing of those professional societies most responsive to technicians.

Chapter 4 familiarizes students with the calculator, including the use of algebraic logic systems and the mathematics of signed numbers. The rules for adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing signed numbers appear in Appendix B. Chapter 5 discusses the use of dimensions and units. A simple four-step approach ensures the student's good grasp of unit conversion. The table of equivalents on the inside front cover provides necessary conversion factors. Chapter 6, which gives the student a taste of the geometry needed in the technologies, is filled with examples that feature step-by-step solutions. The material covering right-triangle trigonometry uses only the first quadrant (acute angles less than 900). The vector material may be effectively introduced in the first term of study. Appendix C presents mnemonics to aid students in using trigonometric functions.

Chapter 7 focuses on communication, including proper experimental methods, graphing, oral reporting, and report writing. Chapter 8 covers the basics of microcomputers and personal computers. Early exposure to the computer is essential to both today's college success and tomorrow's career satisfaction for the technical student. Two glossaries in the chapter will help the student master the language of computers, and the inside back cover lists the most frequently used (command-oriented) DOS commands and selected operating system commands.

Chapter 9 addresses Networking, the Internet, and Industrial Automation. The latter focuses on computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM), including controllers and control loops, numerical control (NC), flexible manufacturing systems (FMS), and distributed control systems (DCS). Chapter 10 describes future challenges the engineering technologist will confront: robotics, expert systems, optical systems, new composite materials, and protection of our environment. Appendix D, a glossary of abbreviations and acronyms used in technology, will be a valuable reference throughout the course and beyond.

Acknowledgments

I could not have written this text without the support of my wife Constance. To have an honest and sensitive critic, who is always there, is paramount to any writer's success.

My colleagues at Central Ohio Technical College have been of immeasurable value to all of my professional work. I wish to thank them for their proofreading, comments, and recommendations. Dr. Nelson Riedel, an electrical engineer and retired Bell Labs R&D manager, has contributed the new material in Chapter 8, The Personal Computer. His creative writing approach has resulted in building a home computer from scratch as well as indicating trends for the future. The beginnings of Chapter 9, on networking and the Internet, also represent his contributions. I am deeply indebted to him for this insightful work.

Special thanks also to Philip Regalbuto, an engineering technology instructor at Trident Technical College in Charleston, South Carolina. Phil has contributed to an enhanced awareness of the need for introductory engineering curricula through his professional presentations and publications.

I thank the following reviewers of this edition for their helpful comments: Zhao Zhang, Missouri Western State College; and George Fredericks, Northeast State Technical Community College.

The staff of Prentice Hall provided me with the professional support needed to make this text a quality product. Thanks to all of them.

I welcome your feedback and suggestions. You can contact me at POND@EE.NET.

<%END%>
Read More Show Less

Introduction

Graduates of 2- and 4-year technical programs will become society's implementors, those who transform concepts into reality. They must combine a practical understanding of materials, machinery, and processes with the theories of today's practicing engineer. Graduates will work on the cutting edge of technology, installing, operating, and maintaining new equipment in manufacturing and service industries. The implementors will be needed by society, challenged by their careers, and rewarded by their successes. This book is for them.

Changes in the Fifth Edition

The most extensive improvements in the fifth edition of Introduction to Engineering Technology are

  • Employment and salary information, as well as occupational information, has been updated.
  • Financial problem solving .has been added to the Problem Solving Section in Chapter 3.
  • Technological advances since the fourth edition have been added. Data on graphing calculators (e.g., the TI-86) have been updated in Chapter 4. All computer information has been updated.
  • Chapter 8 has been radically altered to afford the student the information needed to build a home computer. The material in the first two sections of Chapter 9 has been replaced with three new sections on computer networks and using the Internet.
  • New figures and photos have been added to clarify the concepts presented.
  • Both students and instructors will benefit from the added number of homework problems. Web search problems have been added to all chapters. Specific website addresses may change, so instructors and students should learn to depend on search engines, such as Yahoo, Lycos,Altavista, and Goto.com.

To the Student

Today, the key to survival—for all nations—is to have an adequate number of technicians and technologists to produce, install, and maintain state-of-the-art equipment, train and supervise industry's skilled workers, and support research and development efforts. This book's holistic approach will help those of you seeking to become society's implementors receive a quality education. It will allow you to answer these questions:

  • Am I suited for a career in technology?
  • What tools do I need to be successful?
  • How will I apply these tools in business and industry?

This text will present an overall picture of the engineering world with the technician's and technologist's places in it. It stresses the importance of possessing a good attitude and paying close attention to detail. It also provides you with the opportunity to use the language and tools of the math-sciences. The language and tools this book presents are those you will need to be successful in the real world of business and industry. I encourage you to sharpen your problem-solving abilities by working the problems at the ends of the chapters. The answers to the odd-numbered problems are at the back of this text.

To the Instructor

The text material has been used in the classroom and has worked well for my two-year college students. Students without a strong mathematics and science background can learn from the material: Appendices B and C review the mathematical principles necessary to understand the text. Introduction to Engineering Technology may be used as the primary text for Orientation to Engineering Technology courses or as a supplement for courses requiring the use of applied mathematics, computers, or scientific calculators.

The text also may be used in secondary school technical preparatory (tech prep) programs. Dale Parnell's popular book The Neglected Majority discusses the need for more structured mathematics and science education for the "middle fifty percent of any high school's student body." This text provides a vital practical base to support such a structured approach.

This book contains numerous practical applications to enhance understanding of the concepts discussed. Students wish to work with current applications (e.g., graphing calculators in Chapter 4 and ladder diagrams in Chapter 9) as well as learn the basics. I encourage you to discuss the applications in class, as well as to discuss your own problem-solving experiences.

Introduction to Engineering Technology, Fifth Edition, is supported by a complete instructor's manual, containing performance objectives for each chapter, suggested class activities, transparency masters, and worked-out solutions to all problems.

Organization

Chapters 1 and 2 contain a brief history of engineering and career information for technicians and technologists. Career information includes such topics as the role of the technologist, the need for good communication skills and teamwork, and potential salary information for the future. Major technologies discussed are Chemical, Civil, Architectural, Electrical/Electronic, Computer, Industrial, and Mechanical. Chapter 3 covers college survival skills—using the technical library, maintaining good grades, scheduling adequate study time, and applying basic problem-solving skills. Resume writing, interviewing techniques, and looking ahead to graduation prepare students for their ultimate goal—gaining desirable employment. Membership in a professional society is recommended. Appendix A provides a listing of those professional societies most responsive to technicians.

Chapter 4 familiarizes students with the calculator, including the use of algebraic logic systems and the mathematics of signed numbers. The rules for adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing signed numbers appear in Appendix B. Chapter 5 discusses the use of dimensions and units. A simple four-step approach ensures the student's good grasp of unit conversion. The table of equivalents on the inside front cover provides necessary conversion factors. Chapter 6, which gives the student a taste of the geometry needed in the technologies, is filled with examples that feature step-by-step solutions. The material covering right-triangle trigonometry uses only the first quadrant (acute angles less than 900). The vector material may be effectively introduced in the first term of study. Appendix C presents mnemonics to aid students in using trigonometric functions.

Chapter 7 focuses on communication, including proper experimental methods, graphing, oral reporting, and report writing. Chapter 8 covers the basics of microcomputers and personal computers. Early exposure to the computer is essential to both today's college success and tomorrow's career satisfaction for the technical student. Two glossaries in the chapter will help the student master the language of computers, and the inside back cover lists the most frequently used (command-oriented) DOS commands and selected operating system commands.

Chapter 9 addresses Networking, the Internet, and Industrial Automation. The latter focuses on computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM), including controllers and control loops, numerical control (NC), flexible manufacturing systems (FMS), and distributed control systems (DCS). Chapter 10 describes future challenges the engineering technologist will confront: robotics, expert systems, optical systems, new composite materials, and protection of our environment. Appendix D, a glossary of abbreviations and acronyms used in technology, will be a valuable reference throughout the course and beyond.

Acknowledgments

I could not have written this text without the support of my wife Constance. To have an honest and sensitive critic, who is always there, is paramount to any writer's success.

My colleagues at Central Ohio Technical College have been of immeasurable value to all of my professional work. I wish to thank them for their proofreading, comments, and recommendations. Dr. Nelson Riedel, an electrical engineer and retired Bell Labs R&D manager, has contributed the new material in Chapter 8, The Personal Computer. His creative writing approach has resulted in building a home computer from scratch as well as indicating trends for the future. The beginnings of Chapter 9, on networking and the Internet, also represent his contributions. I am deeply indebted to him for this insightful work.

Special thanks also to Philip Regalbuto, an engineering technology instructor at Trident Technical College in Charleston, South Carolina. Phil has contributed to an enhanced awareness of the need for introductory engineering curricula through his professional presentations and publications.

I thank the following reviewers of this edition for their helpful comments: Zhao Zhang, Missouri Western State College; and George Fredericks, Northeast State Technical Community College.

The staff of Prentice Hall provided me with the professional support needed to make this text a quality product. Thanks to all of them.

I welcome your feedback and suggestions. You can contact me at POND@EE.NET.

Read More Show Less

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