Introduction to Fruit Crops / Edition 1

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Overview

Find vital facts and information on a wide range of fruit crops—without having to read the entire chapter!

Introduction to Fruit Crops combines an easy-to-use format with a complete review of essential facts about the world’s top fruit crops, making this both the premiere introductory textbook for students AND a superior reference book for avid gardeners, country agents, and horticulture educators. Each fruit is studied and clearly explained through its taxonomy, origin, history of cultivation, production, botanical description, optimum soil and climate, harvesting, and post-harvest handling. The book provides a comprehensive introductory section on fruit culture and, in following chapters, a standard outline for each crop to allow readers to find facts rapidly without having to read the entire chapter. This invaluable text includes detailed references and reading lists, making this a perfect addition for reference in university libraries.

Pomology, the branch of botany that studies the cultivation of fruits, has unique facts and features not found in the studies of other cultivated crops. Introduction to Fruit Crops takes these unique pomological concepts and important facts about the most popular cultivated fruits of the world and presents them in a consistent reader-friendly format that is readily understandable to beginning students. Professionals in the plant or agriculture sciences will find this text to be a powerful reference tool to answer their questions and find facts quickly and easily. Other issues explored include preventative measures from pests and diseases and practical cultivation strategies to best encourage maximum yield for each crop. Tables, graphs, and a multitude of color photographs assist readers to completely understand crucial information and the various stages of fruit growth for each crop. A detailed appendix explains common names, scientific names, and families of fruit crops. Another appendix presents conversion factors used in the text. A glossary helps beginners by clearly explaining common terms used in fruit crop study.

Introduction to Fruit Crops includes information on:

  • scientific names
  • folklore
  • medicinal properties
  • non-food usage
  • production
  • botanical description
  • plant morphology
  • pollination
  • soils
  • climate
  • propagation
  • rootstocks
  • planting design, training, and pruning
  • pest problems—including weeds, insects, mites, and diseases
  • harvest and postharvest handling
  • food uses

    Some of the crops described include:

  • African oil palm
  • banana
  • orange
  • grape
  • apple
  • coconut
  • coffee
  • strawberry
  • nuts
  • olives
  • and many, many others!

This one text provides an extensive, easily understandable overview of the processes for growing healthy fruit in today’s world for beginners and is a valuable desk reference for plant science professionals of all types.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781560222590
  • Publisher: CRC Press
  • Publication date: 8/28/2006
  • Series: Crop Science Ser.
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 462
  • Product dimensions: 8.10 (w) x 10.70 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1. Introduction to Fruit Crops and Overview of the Text
  • "Fruit Crop" Defined
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet, Food Uses
  • Chapter 2. Almond (Prunus dulcis)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 3. Apple (Malus domestica)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 4. Apricot (Prunus armeniaca)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 5. Banana and Plantain (Musa spp.)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 6. Blackberries and Raspberries (Rubus spp.)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 7. Blueberries (Vaccinium spp.)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 8. Cacao (Theobroma cacao)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 9. Cashew (Anacardium occidentale)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 10. Cherry (Prunus avium, Prunus cerasus)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 11. Citrus Fruits (Citrus spp.)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 12. Coconut (Cocos nucifera)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 13. Coffee (Coffea arabica, Coffea canephora)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 14. Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 15. Date (Phoenix dactylifera)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 16. Grapes (Vitis spp.)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 17. Hazelnut or Filbert (Corylus avellana)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 18. Macadamia (Macadamia integrifolia, Macadamia tetraphylla)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 19. Mango (Mangifera indica)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 20. Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 21. Olive (Olea europaea)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 22. Papaya (Carica papaya)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 23. Peach (Prunus persica)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 24. Pears (Pyrus communis, Pyrus pyrifolia)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 25. Pecan (Carya illinoensis)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 26. Pineapple (Ananas comosus)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 27. Pistachio (Pistacia vera)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 28. Plums (Prunus domestica, Prunus salicina)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 29. Strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Chapter 30. Walnuts (Juglans spp.)
  • Taxonomy
  • Origin, History of Cultivation
  • Folklore, Medicinal Properties, Nonfood Usage
  • Production
  • Botanical Description
  • General Culture
  • Harvest, Postharvest Handling
  • Contribution to Diet
  • Appendix A. Common and Scientific Names of Fruit Crops
  • Appendix B. Useful Conversion Factors
  • Appendix C. List of Illustrations
  • Glossary
  • Index
  • Reference Notes Included
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