Introduction to Glycobiology

Introduction to Glycobiology

by Maureen E. Taylor, Kurt Drickamer
     
 

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Sugars are familiar as vital sources of energy. Yet the biological importance of the sugars extends well beyond their value as cellular fuels. Introduction to Glycobiology reveals the true impact of sugars on biological systems, explaining their function at the molecular, cellular, and organismal level. Employing a two-part structure, the book leads us through

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Overview

Sugars are familiar as vital sources of energy. Yet the biological importance of the sugars extends well beyond their value as cellular fuels. Introduction to Glycobiology reveals the true impact of sugars on biological systems, explaining their function at the molecular, cellular, and organismal level. Employing a two-part structure, the book leads us through essential principles and concepts upon which the discipline is grounded, before exploring the diverse roles of sugars throughout biological systems, including development, cell signalling, and protein trafficking. It also emphasises the importance of glycobiology in disease, and explains how an understanding of the link between the two is enabling us to develop new therapeutic strategies. Taking the student from the fundamental principles to the frontiers of the subject, and with a wealth of learning features to get the most out of their studies, Introduction to Glycobiology remains the ideal resource for students and teachers alike. Online Resource Centre For students: Updates - surveys of key developments in the field, provided on a six-monthly basis, to maintain currency Library of molecular structures to help students visualize structures and gain a proper appreciation of the link between structure and function Hyperlinked references to facilitate access to primary literature For registered adopters of the book: Full colour figures, available for download individually or as PowerPoint slides with key explanatory points Answers to end of chapter questions Journal Clubs Features
• The only text to make this important area of biochemistry accessible to an undergraduate audience
• Illustrates the biological importance of sugars with diverse examples, to stimulate and engage students throughout the biosciences
• Thought-provoking questions linked to the latest research encourage the student to explore the subject for themselves, and gain an appreciation of how current resear

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Eugene A Davidson, PhD (Georgetown University School of Medicine)
Description: Intended as an introduction to glycoscience for students, this book covers glycoproteins, glycolipids, and lectins.
Purpose: The authors state that this book is intended as a text for undergraduates. This would be a desirable goal if such courses were broadly taught. This is not the case and, in any event, the overall value as a text is quite limited.
Audience: Intended for the student, much of the material would be accessible to any investigator wishing additional background material in glycoconjugates. The authors have a strong background in the lectin area but appear much less well versed in basic carbohydrate chemistry and enzymology.
Features: This book is presented as an undergraduate-level text to introduce students to the general area of glycobiology. As one of the remaining frontier areas, glycobiology is an appropriate field to introduce to students so they can develop a deeper understanding of glycoscience. In this area, a suitable mix of chemistry, biochemistry, and biology is required. This book does well in two of these but has shortcomings in the chemical material. A brief introductory chapter on chemistry of saccharides is followed by discussions of N- and O-linked glycoproteins, glycolipids, and effects of glycosylation on protein structure and trafficking. The concluding section focuses on lectins. In general, the coverage is adequate and most areas of glycobiology are discussed. There are, however, several shortcomings that limit enthusiasm. A number of the chemical formulas are either incorrect or improperly named — included are those for the nucleotide sugars (beta-linkages instead of alpha), iduronic acid (identified as D- rather than L-). In addition, it would have been useful to include material on the biosynthetic relationships among the sugars and that all derive from D-glucose (and why). The biosynthesis of sugar nucleotides is poorly illustrated and leaves the impression that most UDP-galactose is formed directly from galactose (rather than by epimerizatrion of UDP-glucose).
Assessment: This is a disappointing effort in an area where a good book would have had considerable utility. The chemistry is weak, at times misleading. In addition, little information about biosynthesis is provided. Other recent book in this field are more accurate and to be preferred.
From the Publisher

"Whether the research in your laboratory focuses on protein engineering or you wish to adopt a method for engineering a protein of interest, you will find this book, with its up-to-date stepwise protocols and experimentally oriented language, well suited to these goals." --The Quarterly Review of Biology

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199569113
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
06/24/2011
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
1,419,428
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.70(d)

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