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Introduction to Health Sciences Librarianship

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Overview

Get the foundational knowledge about health sciences librarianship

The general term "health sciences libraries" covers a wide range of areas beyond medical libraries, such as biomedical, nursing, allied health, pharmacy, and others. Introduction to Health Sciences Librarianship provides a sound foundation to all aspects of these types of libraries to students and librarians new to the field. This helpful guide provides a helpful overview of the health care environment, technical services, public services, management issues, academic health sciences, hospital libraries, health informatics, evidence-based practice, and more. This text provides crucial information every beginning and practicing health sciences librarian needs—all in one volume.

Introduction to Health Sciences Librarianship presents some of the most respected librarians and educators in the field, each discussing important aspects of librarianship, including technical services, public services, administration, special services, and special collections. This comprehensive volume provides all types of librarians with helpful general, practical, and theoretical knowledge about this profession. The book's unique "A Day in the Life of ... "feature describes typical days of health sciences librarians working in special areas such as reference or consumer health, and offers anyone new to the field a revealing look at what a regular workday is like. The text is packed with useful figures, screen captures, tables, and references.

Topics discussed in Introduction to Health Sciences Librarianship include:

• verview of health sciences libraries
• ealth environment
• ollection development of journals, books, and electronic resources
• rganization of health information
• ccess services
• nformation services and information retrieval
• nformation literacy
• ealth informatics
• anagement of academic health sciences libraries
• anagement and issues in hospital libraries
• ibrary space planning
• pecialized services

Introduction to Health Sciences Librarianship provides essential information for health sciences librarians, medical librarians, beginning and intermediate level health sciences/medical librarians, and any health sciences librarian wishing to review the field. This crucial volume belongs in every academic health sciences library, hospital library, specialized health library, biomedical library, and academic library.
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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Andrea E. Lynch, MLIS (City of Hope)
Description: This book brings together an overview of health sciences librarianship with present practice and forecasting trends.
Purpose: The purpose is to reflect current and future practice and trends. It's meant to be used by both library students and entry-level and practicing health sciences librarians. It strives to be relevant now that it is published in print form.
Audience: The audience includes students, entry-level health sciences librarians, practicing health sciences librarians, and experienced librarians who are moving to this type of library. The editor has assembled leaders from various aspects of health sciences librarianship to contribute to this book.
Features: The areas covered range from an introduction of health sciences librarianship and a "setting the stage" section on the healthcare landscape to the inner workings of this type of library — managing collections through providing consumer health information services. The organization of chapters varies depending on the topic, but most sections have a summary, introduction, conclusion, and references. Some chapters include features such as "A Day in the Life," appendixes, and further reading. A glossary of terms, a compilation of the bolded words found throughout the book, ends the book.
Assessment: As a relatively new health and life science librarian, I find this book useful in my everyday activities.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780789035950
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis, Inc.
  • Publication date: 12/10/2007
  • Pages: 546
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 10.20 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

M. Sandra Wood, MLS, MBA, AHIP, FMLA, is Librarian Emerita, Pennsylvania State University. Previously, she was Librarian, Reference and Database Services, The George T. Harrell Library, The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA. At Hershey, she served in various capacities in the reference department, was promoted academically to Librarian, and was tenured. Ms. Wood holds a MLS from Indiana University (1970) and an MBA from the University of Maryland (1983). She retired in December 2005 with over 35 years of experience as a medical reference librarian; her experience and interests are in general reference, management of reference services, database and Internet searching, and user instruction. Ms. Wood has been widely published in the field of medical reference and is Editor of Medical Reference Services Quarterly and Journal of Consumer Health on the Internet, and is Co-editor of the Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries (Haworth). She is author or editor of numerous books for the Haworth Press, including Health Care Resources on the Internet: A Guide for Librarians and Health Care Consumers, and was editor of Reference and Information Services in Health Sciences Libraries, volume 1 of MLA's series, Current Practice in Health Sciences Librarianship. She has been an active member of the Medical Library Association (MLA) and the Special Libraries Association. Her activities in MLA includes serving as Chairman and Section Council Representative of the Reference Services Section (now Public Services Section); serving on 3 National Program Committees and 2 MLA Nominating Committees; and serving on numerous national committees, including the Credentialing Committee. She has received MLA's Eliot Award, and the Chapter Achievement Award from the Philadelphia Chapter/MLA. Ms. Wood was elected to MLA's Board of Directors (1991-1995) and served as MLA's Treasurer. Ms. Wood has been a Distinguished Member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals since 1990 and a Fellow of the Medical Library Association since 1998.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Contributors
Preface (Joanne Gard Marshall)
Introduction (M. Sandra Wood)
Chapter 1. Overview of Health Sciences Libraries (Mary Moore)
Introduction
The Profession of Health Sciences Librarianship
Health Sciences Libraries
The U.S. National Library of Medicine
Trends Affecting Health Sciences Librarianship
The Teaching Library
Conclusion
Chapter 2. The Health Care Environment (Logan Ludwig)
Introduction
The Modern Health Care System
The Changing Federal Role in U.S. Health Care
Organizational Components of Academic Medicine
Medical Education
Health Sciences Research
The Future of Academic Medicine
Conclusion
Chapter 3. Journal Collection Development: Challenges, Issues, and Strategies (Laurie L. Thompson and Mori Lou Higa)
Introduction
Selection
Online Licensing and Negotiation/Vendor Relations
Copyright
Open Access
Benchmarking/Evaluating Use of Resources
Digital Archives
Conclusion
Chapter 4. Monographic and Digital Resource Collection Development (Esther Carrigan, Mori Lou Higa, and Rajia Tobia)
Introduction
Overview and Relationships
Monograph Selection and Collection Development Policies
Selection and Evaluation of Digital Resources
Preservation
Conclusion
Chapter 5. Organizing Resources for Information Access (Maggie Wineburgh-Freed)
Introduction
Brief History of Information Organization by Libraries
Overview: Current Methods
Current Cataloging Practices
Organizing Specific Materials
Glimpses of What's to Come
Chapter 6. Access Issues (Elizabeth R. Lorbeer and Cindy Scroggins)
Introduction
Fundamentals of Access
Access Services
Physical Access
Electronic Access
Shades of Gray: Services Straddling The Physical and Electronic Divide
Network Access
Access for Disabilities
Conclusion
Chapter 7. Information Services in Health Sciences Libraries (Elizabeth H. Wood)
Introduction
Information in the High-Tech Environment
Types of Health Sciences Information Needs
Librarian-User Interaction
Virtual Reference
The Reference Interview
Single-Service Desks and Triaging Requests
Selected Information Services
Information Service Ethics
Conclusion
Chapter 8. Information Retrieval in the Health Sciences (Elizabeth H. Wood)
Introduction
Types of Literature in the Health Sciences
Databases in the Health Sciences
MEDLINE
Other Major Databases in the Health Sciences
Full-Text Databases
Providing Search Services
The Mediated Search Process
Evaluating and Delivering the Results of the Search
Conclusion 212
Chapter 9. Marketing, Public Relations, and Communication (Patricia C. Higginbottom and Lisa A. Ennis)
Introduction
Marketing in Libraries
How Marketing Has Changed
Marketing in Health Sciences Libraries
Methods for Promoting Libraries
Print/Physical Materials
In-Person Events
The Virtual World
Communication
Funding Issues
Conclusion
Chapter 10. Information Literacy Education in Health Sciences Libraries (Stewart M. Brower)
Introduction: What Is Information Literacy?
Information Literacy Standards and Objectives
Criticisms of Information Literacy
Learning Theories and Pedagogies
The Millennials
Planning an Information Literacy Program
Information Literacy Program Designs
IL Instruction Activities and Techniques
Information Literacy Assessment
The Future of Information Literacy
Chapter 11. Evidence-Based Practice (Jonathan D. Eldredge)
Introduction
Librarians' Roles in EBM
Evidence-Based Librarianship (EBL)
Conclusion
Chapter 12. Health Informatics (K. Ann McKibbon and Ellen Gay Detlefsen)
Introduction
Definitions
History
Types of Data Used in Health Informatics
Formats of Health Information
Domains of Health Informatics
Bioinformatics
Imaging Informatics
Clinical Informatics
Public Health Informatics
Standards and Vocabulary
Information Retrieval and Automatic Classification
Privacy, Confidentiality, and Security
Education in Health Informatics
Future
Health Sciences Librarians and Health Informatics
Conclusion
Chapter 13. Management in Academic Health Sciences Libraries (Francesca Allegri and Martha Bedard)
Introduction
Managing in the Academic Health Sciences Environment
The Roles of Library Administrators
Managing Personnel
Managing Facilities
Conclusion
Chapter 14. Management of and Issues Specific to Hospital Libraries (Dixie A. Jones)
Introduction
Reporting Structure
Staffing
Standards/Accreditation
Populations Served
Services
Collection Development and Management
Networking
Marketing and Proving Value of Services
Roles
Space and Library As Place
Legal/Ethical Issues
Time Management
Strategic Planning
Professional Development
Technology Issues
Security
Data Collection
Fiscal Management
Conclusion
Chapter 15. Library Space Planning (Elizabeth Connor)
Introduction
Background
Trends in Library Design
Pre-Design Planning
Site Visits, Research, and Readings
Library Standards
Hiring Consultants and Architects
Facility Planning As Part of Strategic Planning
Significance of Library 2.0 on Design
Advice for Newbies
Conclusion
Chapter 16. Special Services Provided by Health Sciences Libraries (Brenda L. Seago)
Introduction
Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs)
Course Management Systems
Manikins/Simulators
Audience Response Systems
Videoconferencing
Instructional Design
Podcasting
Streaming Video
Conclusion
Chapter 17. Health Sciences Librarianship in Rare Book and Special Collections (Stephen J. Greenberg and Patricia E. Gallagher)
Introduction
Collection Policies
Reference Areas
Reference Services
Education and Training
Reference Sources
Technical Services
Storage and Stack Security
Conclusion
Chapter 18. Consumer Health Information (Catherine Arnott Smith)
Introduction
CHI in Libraries
The National Library of Medicine and CHI
CHI Seekers
Challenges in CHI Provision
Providing for CHI Services
CHI Service Evaluation
Collaboration
Resources for Consumer Health Information Practice
Glossary
Index
Reference Notes Included
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