Introduction to Industrial Organization / Edition 1

Introduction to Industrial Organization / Edition 1

2.0 2
by Luis M. B. Cabral
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0262032864

ISBN-13: 9780262032865

Pub. Date: 08/21/2000

Publisher: MIT Press

Over the past twenty years, the study of industrial organization -- the analysis of imperfectly competitive markets -- has grown from a niche area of microeconomics to a key component of economics and of related disciplines such as finance, strategy, and marketing. This book provides an issue-driven introduction to industrial organization. It includes a vast array

Overview

Over the past twenty years, the study of industrial organization -- the analysis of imperfectly competitive markets -- has grown from a niche area of microeconomics to a key component of economics and of related disciplines such as finance, strategy, and marketing. This book provides an issue-driven introduction to industrial organization. It includes a vast array of examples, from both within and outside the United States. While formal in its approach, the book is written in a way that requires only basic mathematical training. Supplemental materials posted on the Web make more extensive use of algebra and calculus.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780262032865
Publisher:
MIT Press
Publication date:
08/21/2000
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.62(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Preface xi
PART ONE Introduction 1(66)
What Is Industrial Organization?
3(12)
An Example
4(2)
Central Questions
6(5)
Coming Next
11(4)
Summary
12(1)
Key Concepts
13(1)
Review and Practice Exercise
13(2)
Basic Microeconomics
15(20)
Demand
15(3)
Costs
18(6)
Profit Maximization
24(2)
Efficiency
26(9)
Summary
29(1)
Key Concepts
29(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
30(3)
Extension Exercise
33(2)
The Firm
35(14)
Do Firms Maximize Profits?
35(5)
What Determines the Firm's Boundaries?
40(2)
Why Are Firms Different?
42(7)
Summary
45(1)
Key Concepts
45(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
45(1)
Extension Exercises
46(3)
Games and Strategy
49(18)
Dominant Strategies, Dominated Strategies, and Nash Equilibrium
51(4)
Sequential Games: Commitment and Backward Induction
55(4)
Repeated Games
59(8)
Summary
62(1)
Key Concepts
63(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
63(3)
Extension Exercise
66(1)
PART TWO From Monopoly to Perfect Competition 67(32)
Monopoly and Regulation
69(16)
Monopoly
69(6)
Regulation
75(3)
Essential Facilities and Access Pricing
78(7)
Summary
82(1)
Key Concepts
82(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
83(2)
Perfect (and Almost Perfect) Competition
85(14)
Perfect Competition
85(2)
From Theory to Stylized Facts
87(2)
Competitive Selection
89(2)
Monopolistic Competition
91(3)
Coming Next
94(5)
Summary
96(1)
Key Concepts
96(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
96(3)
PART THREE Oligopoly 99(66)
Oligopoly Competition
101(26)
The Bertrand Model
102(2)
Pricing with Capacity Constraints
104(3)
The Cournot Model
107(6)
Bertrand versus Cournot
113(1)
The Models at Work: Comparative Statics
114(13)
Summary
124(1)
Key Concepts
124(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
125(1)
Extension Exercise
126(1)
Collusion
127(24)
Repeated Interaction and the Stability of Collusive Agreements
128(5)
Price Wars
133(4)
Factors That Facilitate Collusion
137(7)
Public Policy
144(7)
Summary
145(1)
Key Concepts
145(1)
Review and Practical Exercises
146(4)
Extension Exercise
150(1)
Market Structure and Market Power
151(14)
Concentration and Market Power: Theory
151(5)
Concentration and Market Power: Empirical Estimation
156(3)
Conduct and Market Power: Empirical Estimation
159(6)
Summary
162(1)
Key Concepts
163(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
163(1)
Extension Exercise
163(2)
PART FOUR Price and Nonprice Strategies 165(74)
Price Discrimination
167(22)
Types of Price Discrimination
169(1)
Third-Degree Price Discrimination
170(2)
Nonlinear Pricing
172(3)
Versioning, Bundling, and Other Forms of Consumer Sorting
175(5)
Is Price Discrimination Legal? Should It Be?
180(9)
Summary
183(1)
Key Concepts
184(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
184(3)
Extension Exercise
187(2)
Vertical Relations
189(16)
Double Marginalization and Two-Part Tariffs
190(3)
Retailer Competition
193(1)
Investment Externalities
193(1)
Indirect Control
194(2)
Manufacturer Competition
196(3)
Are Vertical Restraints Legal? Should They Be?
199(6)
Summary
200(1)
Key Concepts
200(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
201(2)
Extension Exercise
203(2)
Product Differentiation
205(18)
Horizontal Differentiation, Vertical Differentiation, and the Characteristics Approach
206(3)
Product Differentiation and Market Power
209(6)
Product Positioning
215(2)
Imperfect Information and Switching Costs
217(6)
Summary
219(1)
Key Concepts
220(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
220(1)
Extension Exercise
221(2)
Advertising
223(16)
Information, Persuasion, and Signaling
223(4)
Advertising Intensity
227(4)
Price Competition and Advertising
231(8)
Summary
235(1)
Key Concepts
235(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
235(2)
Extension Exercise
237(2)
PART FIVE Entry and Exit 239(50)
Entry Costs, Market Structure, and Welfare
241(18)
Entry Costs and Market Structure
243(4)
Endogenous versus Exogenous Entry Costs
247(5)
Free Entry and Social Welfare
252(7)
Summary
256(1)
Key Concepts
256(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
256(1)
Extension Exercise
257(2)
Strategic Behavior, Entry and Exit
259(30)
Entry Deterrence
260(9)
Predation
269(8)
Mergers and Acquisitions
277(12)
Summary
285(1)
Key Concepts
286(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
286(2)
Extension Exercise
288(1)
PART SIX Technology 289(46)
Research and Development
291(20)
Market Structure and Incentives for R&D
292(3)
The Dynamics of R&D Competition
295(8)
Public Policy
303(8)
Summary
308(1)
Key Concepts
308(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
309(2)
Networks and Standards
311(24)
Consumer Expectations and Critical Mass
312(2)
Path Dependence
314(5)
Excess Inertia and Excess Momentum
319(5)
Compatibility
324(2)
Public Policy
326(9)
Summary
328(1)
Key Concepts
329(1)
Review and Practice Exercises
329(2)
Extension Exercise
331(4)
Notes 335(12)
Index 347

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Introduction to Industrial Organization 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is suppose to be an introduction to industrial organization, but instead turns out to be a summary type of a book. If you are a college student in the field of business, I recommend that you take good notes in class because this text is of no measurable aid. In particular when you are studying game theory, this text just browses at the topic and does not get at the heart of the matter. All in all, forego this book.