Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

3.5 22
by Bertrand Russell
     
 

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In the words of Bertrand Russell, "Because language is misleading, as well as because it is diffuse and inexact when applied to logic (for which it was never intended), logical symbolism is absolutely necessary to any exact or thorough treatment of mathematical philosophy." That assertion underlies this book, a seminal work in the field for more than 70 years. In

Overview

In the words of Bertrand Russell, "Because language is misleading, as well as because it is diffuse and inexact when applied to logic (for which it was never intended), logical symbolism is absolutely necessary to any exact or thorough treatment of mathematical philosophy." That assertion underlies this book, a seminal work in the field for more than 70 years. In it, Russell offers a nontechnical, undogmatic account of his philosophical criticism as it relates to arithmetic and logic. Rather than an exhaustive treatment, however, the influential philosopher and mathematician focuses on certain issues of mathematical logic that, to his mind, invalidated much traditional and contemporary philosophy.
In dealing with such topics as number, order, relations, limits and continuity, propositional functions, descriptions, and classes, Russell writes in a clear, accessible manner, requiring neither a knowledge of mathematics nor an aptitude for mathematical symbolism. The result is a thought-provoking excursion into the fascinating realm where mathematics and philosophy meet — a philosophical classic that will be welcomed by any thinking person interested in this crucial area of modern thought.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780486277240
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
09/14/1993
Pages:
226
Sales rank:
1,330,505
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.48(d)

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Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book explores a much neglected area of philosophy. The Nature of Mathematics and mathematical truth. It also touches briefly on the Ontology of mathematical concepts. Do mathematical concepts exist independently of mathematicians or instead are they invented by them. This is an obscure question to many but could be seen to be as important as asking 'do entities such as numbers and concepts exist independently of the material world. The answer to this question would have very important consequences for materialism as a reigning philosophy. Russell's book is a great intro to this neglected subject.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The only thing which could possibly make this book better would be if it were written after Godel's work.
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Minus the editor's introduction, you can get this book free in several different formats elsewhere... http://people.umass.edu/klement/russell-imp.html
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