Introduction to Philosophy by Jacques Maritain | 9780826477170 | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Introduction to Philosophy

Introduction to Philosophy

by Jacques Maritain
     
 

ISBN-10: 0826477178

ISBN-13: 9780826477170

Pub. Date: 03/04/2005

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

Jacques Maritain (1882-1973) was a Neo-Thomist philosopher who taught in France and the United States and was French Ambassador to the Vatican from 1945-48. A Protestant who became a Roman Catholic through association with Leon Bloy, he devoted himself to the study of Thomism and its application to all aspects of modern life and urged Christian involvement in

Overview

Jacques Maritain (1882-1973) was a Neo-Thomist philosopher who taught in France and the United States and was French Ambassador to the Vatican from 1945-48. A Protestant who became a Roman Catholic through association with Leon Bloy, he devoted himself to the study of Thomism and its application to all aspects of modern life and urged Christian involvement in secular affairs.

An Introduction to Philosophy is perhaps the most well-known and enduring of all Maritain's many books. It offers a clear and highly readable introduction to the philosophies of both Aristotle and St Thomas Aquinas.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780826477170
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Academic
Publication date:
03/04/2005
Series:
Impacts Series
Edition description:
New
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.50(d)

Table of Contents

Prefacev
Introductionxiii
Introductoryxix
Part 1The Nature of Philosophy
IPhilosophic Thought before Philosophy in the Strict Sense3
Introduction
Primitive tradition4
The Semites and the Egyptians
The Indo-Europeans5
(a)The Persians
(b)The Indians6
(i)Brahmanism
(ii)Buddhism11
(iii)Other schools13
(c)The Chinese14
Limitations of human wisdom18
The Greeks the chosen people of reason19
IIThe Pre-Socratic Philosophers21
The Sages
The Ionians22
(a)Thales and his successors
(b)The great physicists24
(i)Heraclitus
(ii)Democritus26
(iii)Anaxagoras27
The Italians: Pythagoras28
The Eleatics: Parmenides32
IIIThe Sophists and Socrates34
Introduction
The sophists35
Socrates37
(a)Ethics and knowledge38
(b)Irony, maieutic, dialectic39
(c)Moderate intellectualism40
IVPlato and Aristotle42
The minor Socratics
Plato43
(a)His theory of ideas
(b)His system of philosophy45
(c)Its limitations47
Aristotle48
(a)Corrections of Plato49
(b)The Aristotelian system52
(c)Aristotle's works56
Aristotle and St. Thomas60
Philosophia perennis62
VDefinition of Philosophy64
Scientific knowledge
Its material object67
Its formal object
Conclusion I69
Further considerations
VIPhilosophy and the Special Sciences71
Philosophy judges the special sciences
It governs them72
It defends them76
It is pre-eminently free77
Further observations
Conclusion II81
VIIPhilosophy and Theology82
Nature of theology
Theology judges philosophy83
Philosophy submits to theology its conclusions, not its premises84
Philosophia ancilla theologiae86
Further considerations
Conclusion III88
VIIIPhilosophy and Common Sense89
Unscientific knowledge
Philosophy is derived from common sense, understood as the natural apprehension of first principles90
Common sense may accidentally judge philosophy91
Conclusion IV
The method of philosophy95
Part 2The Classification of Philosophy
IThe Main Divisions of Philosophy101
Logic. Theoretical philosophy. Practical philosophy
Their objects104
Conclusion V106
IILogic107
Correct reasoning
Ideas and images108
Conclusion VI109
Individual and universal
Conclusion VII111
The problems of universals
(a)Nominalism
(b)Realism112
(c)Moderate Realism
IIIThe Philosophy of Mathematics and the Philosophy of Nature114
The term body
The philosophy of mathematics
The philosophy of nature115
(a)Mechanism116
(b)Dynamism
(c)Hylomorphism117
Psychology119
Problem of the origin of ideas
Conclusion VIII121
Abstraction: Problem of human nature
Conflicting schools123
IVCriticism (Epistemology)126
Being qua being
Criticism
Problem of truth127
Conclusion IX129
Conflicting schools
(a)Scepticism
(b)Rationalism
(c)Moderate intellectualism130
Problem of the object of the intellect131
Conclusion X133
Being and intelligibility
Conclusion XI134
VOntology: Essence135
Problems of ontology
Essence136
(a)In the wide sense137
(b)In the strict sense139
Characteristics of this essence141
Conclusion XII144
Further observations
Our intellect can apprehend essence146
Conclusion XIII
Further observations
Essence is universal in the mind148
Conclusion XIV149
Individual nature and matter
(a)Individual nature150
(b)First matter151
(c)Archetypal being152
(d)Nature, essence, and quiddity154
VIOntology: Substance and Accident157
Origin of these notions
Substance161
Conclusion XV163
Further observations
Accident165
Conclusion XVI166
Further observations
Conflicting schools167
The individuality of substance170
(a)Substantia prima, substantia secunda
(b)Per se, a se, in se173
VIIOntology: Act and Potentiality176
Origin of these notions
(a)Identity and change
(b)Their apparent incompatibility177
(c)Solved by the concept potentiality178
Potency or potentiality179
Act180
Conclusion XVII181
The nature of change
Act and potentiality in things
Axioms i-vii183
Conflicting schools185
Terminology
(a)Material and formal186
(b)Virtual and formal (actual)188
(c)Implicit and explicit
(d)In express act, in accomplished act189
VIIITheodicy (Natural Theology)190
Subsistent being itself191
IXThe Philosophy of Art; Ethics193
Introduction
The philosophy of art
Ethics196
Divisions of ethics
Conflicting schools199
Conclusion: Classification of philosophy201

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