Introduction to Post-Tonal Theory / Edition 3

Hardcover (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$57.00
(Save 65%)
Est. Return Date: 09/26/2014
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$97.52
(Save 40%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $87.64
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 46%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (20) from $87.64   
  • New (9) from $148.13   
  • Used (11) from $87.64   

Overview

Designed for a course in twenty-first-century techniques and analysis, this text offers a clear, comprehensive introduction to the basic concepts of post-tonal theory. Each concept is clearly explained and richly illustrated with examples from the musical literature. The text contains model analyses as well as carefully graduated exercises that involve playing, singing, composing, and analyzing.

The third edition stays abreast of recent theoretical developments by including discussions of transformational networks and graphs, contour theory, atonal voice leading, triadic post-tonality (including neotonality), inversional symmetry, and interval cycles. As a result, this text is not only a primer of basic concepts but also an introduction to the current state of post-tonal theory, with its rich array of theoretical concepts and analytical tools.

The third edition also features a wide range of composers and musical styles. Although the "classical" prewar repertoire of music by Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Bartok, Webern, and Berg still comprises the musical core, theoretical concepts are now also illustrated with music by Adams, Babbitt, Berio, Boulez, Britten, Cage, Carter, Cowell, Crawford, Crumb, Debussy, Feldman, Glass, Gubaidulina, Ives, Ligeti, Messiaen, Musgrave, Reich, Ruggles, Sessions, Shostakovich, Stockhausen, Varese, Wolpe, Wuorinen, and Zwillich.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131898905
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 8/18/2004
  • Edition description: 3RD
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 637,941
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Compared to tonal theory, now in its fourth century of development, post-tonal theory is in its infancy. But in the past three decades, it has shown itself to be an infant of prodigious growth and surprising power. A broad consensus has emerged among music theorists regarding the basic musical elements of post-tonal music—pitch, interval, motive, harmony, collection—and this book reports that consensus to a general audience of musicians and students of music. Like books on scales, triads, and simple harmonic progressions in tonal music, this book introduces basic theoretical concepts for the post-tonal music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Beyond basic concepts, the third edition of this book also contains information on many of the most recent developments in post-tonal theory, including expanded or new coverage of the following topics:

  • Transformational networks and graphs
  • Contour theory
  • Composing-out
  • Atonal voice leading
  • Atonal pitch space
  • Triadic post-tonality (including voice-leading parsimony)
  • Inversional symmetry and inversional axes
  • Interval cycles
  • Diatonic, whole-tone, octatonic, and hexatonic collections

As a result, this book is not only a primer of basic concepts but also an introduction to the current state of post-tonal theory, with its rich array of theoretical concepts and analytical tools.

Although this book can make no pretense to comprehensiveness either, either chronologically or theoretically—there is just too much great music and fascinating theory out there—this third edition explores a much wider range of composers and musical styles than its predecessors. Although the "classical" prewar repertoire of music by Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Bart6k, Webern, and Berg still comprises the musical core, theoretical concepts are now also illustrated with music by Adams, Babbitt, Berio, Boulez, Britten, Cage, Carter, Cowell, Crawford, Crumb, Debussy, Feldman, Glass, Gubaidulina, Ives, Ligeti, Messiaen, Musgrave, Reich, Ruggles, Sessions, Shostakovich, Stockhausen, Varese, Wolpe, Wuorinen, and Zwilich.

As with the previous editions of this book, I received invaluable advice from many friends and colleagues based on their teaching experience. I am grateful to Wayne Alpern, Jonathan Bernard, Claire Boge, Ricardo Bordini, Scott Brickman, Michael Buckler, Uri Burstein, James Carr, Patrick Fairfield, Michael Friedmann, Edward Gollin, Dave Headlam, Gary Karpinski, Rosemary Killam, Bruce Quaglia, Daniel Mathers, Carolyn Mullin, Catherine Nolan, Jay Rahn, Nancy Rogers, Steven Rosenhaus, Art Samplaski, Paul Sheehan, Stephen Slottow, David Smyth, Harvey Stokes, Dmitri Tymoczko, and Joyce Yip. My thanks go also to Chris Johnson and Laura Lawrie at Prentice Hall for their expert editorial work at every stage. Michael Berry provided additional editorial assistance. Closer to home, in matters both tangible and intangible, Sally Goldfarb has offered continuing guidance and support beyond my ability to describe or repay. Adam and Michael helped, too.

Joseph N. Straus
Graduate Center City University of New York

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. Basic Concepts and Definitions.

Analysis 1: Webern, Wie bin ich froh! from Three Songs, Op. 25. Schoenberg, Nacht, from Pierrot Lunaire, Op. 21.

2. Pitch-Class Sets.

Analysis 2: Schoenberg, Book of the Hanging Gardens, Op. 15, No. 11. Bartok String Quartet No. 4, first movement.

3. Some Additional Relationships.

Analysis 3: Webern, Movement for String Quartet, Op. 5, No. 4. Berg, Schlafend tragt man mich, from Four Songs, Op. 2., No. 2.

4. Centricity, Referential Collections, and Triadic Post-Tonality.

Analysis 4: Stravinsky, Oedipus Rex, rehearsal nos. 167-70. Bartok, Sonata, first movement.

5. Basic Twelve-Tone Operations.

Analysis 5: Schoenberg, Suite for Piano, Op. 25, Gavotte. Stravinsky, In Memoriam Dylan Thomas.

6. More Twelve-Tone Topics.

Analysis 6: Webern, String Quartet, Op. 28, first movement. Schoenberg, Piano Piece, Op. 33a.

Appendix 1. List of Set Classes.

Appendix 2. Index Vectors.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Preface

Compared to tonal theory, now in its fourth century of development, post-tonal theory is in its infancy. But in the past three decades, it has shown itself to be an infant of prodigious growth and surprising power. A broad consensus has emerged among music theorists regarding the basic musical elements of post-tonal music—pitch, interval, motive, harmony, collection—and this book reports that consensus to a general audience of musicians and students of music. Like books on scales, triads, and simple harmonic progressions in tonal music, this book introduces basic theoretical concepts for the post-tonal music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Beyond basic concepts, the third edition of this book also contains information on many of the most recent developments in post-tonal theory, including expanded or new coverage of the following topics:

  • Transformational networks and graphs
  • Contour theory
  • Composing-out
  • Atonal voice leading
  • Atonal pitch space
  • Triadic post-tonality (including voice-leading parsimony)
  • Inversional symmetry and inversional axes
  • Interval cycles
  • Diatonic, whole-tone, octatonic, and hexatonic collections

As a result, this book is not only a primer of basic concepts but also an introduction to the current state of post-tonal theory, with its rich array of theoretical concepts and analytical tools.

Although this book can make no pretense to comprehensiveness either, either chronologically or theoretically—there is just too much great music and fascinating theory out there—this third edition explores a much wider range of composers and musical styles than its predecessors. Although the "classical" prewar repertoire of music by Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Bart6k, Webern, and Berg still comprises the musical core, theoretical concepts are now also illustrated with music by Adams, Babbitt, Berio, Boulez, Britten, Cage, Carter, Cowell, Crawford, Crumb, Debussy, Feldman, Glass, Gubaidulina, Ives, Ligeti, Messiaen, Musgrave, Reich, Ruggles, Sessions, Shostakovich, Stockhausen, Varese, Wolpe, Wuorinen, and Zwilich.

As with the previous editions of this book, I received invaluable advice from many friends and colleagues based on their teaching experience. I am grateful to Wayne Alpern, Jonathan Bernard, Claire Boge, Ricardo Bordini, Scott Brickman, Michael Buckler, Uri Burstein, James Carr, Patrick Fairfield, Michael Friedmann, Edward Gollin, Dave Headlam, Gary Karpinski, Rosemary Killam, Bruce Quaglia, Daniel Mathers, Carolyn Mullin, Catherine Nolan, Jay Rahn, Nancy Rogers, Steven Rosenhaus, Art Samplaski, Paul Sheehan, Stephen Slottow, David Smyth, Harvey Stokes, Dmitri Tymoczko, and Joyce Yip. My thanks go also to Chris Johnson and Laura Lawrie at Prentice Hall for their expert editorial work at every stage. Michael Berry provided additional editorial assistance. Closer to home, in matters both tangible and intangible, Sally Goldfarb has offered continuing guidance and support beyond my ability to describe or repay. Adam and Michael helped, too.

Joseph N. Straus
Graduate Center
City University of New York

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)