Introduction to Reference Sources in the Health Sciences

Overview

Following the format of the first two editions, the third edition of "Introduction to Reference Sources in the Health Sciences" is divided into three sections: The Reference Collection; Bibliographic Sources; and Information Sources. The purpose remains the same—to discuss various types of reference and informational sources and their uses for reference work in the health sciences. It is written for the library school student as well as for the practicing librarian. The edition has been revised to highlight ...
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Overview

Following the format of the first two editions, the third edition of "Introduction to Reference Sources in the Health Sciences" is divided into three sections: The Reference Collection; Bibliographic Sources; and Information Sources. The purpose remains the same—to discuss various types of reference and informational sources and their uses for reference work in the health sciences. It is written for the library school student as well as for the practicing librarian. The edition has been revised to highlight changes in key reference sources in the health sciences since the previous edition. Portable electronic formats (CD-ROM and disks) and online availability of sources are highlighted. Chapter 5 has been expanded as "Audiovisual, Microcomputer, and Multimedia Reference Sources" to acknowledge the role of these resources in the health sciences.

Author Biography: Fred W. Roper is Dean of the College of Library and Information Science at the University of South Carolina. He is active in the Medical Library Association, and the Association for Library and Information Science Education. Jo Anne Boorkman is Head of the Carlson Health Sciences Library, University of California, Davis. She is the co-author of "Reference Update" in "The Literature of Animal Science and Health", edited by Wallace C. Olsen, Cornell University Press, 1993. She is active in the Medical Library Association and Special Libraries Association.

This book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

James Shedlock
Roper and Boorkman is the standard textbook for descriptions of major reference sources in the health sciences. This third edition provides updated descriptions, highlights changes in formats as a result of new technologies, and provides expanded coverage in place of deleted information. This book discusses reference work in a health sciences library by providing descriptions of various types of reference and information sources and how they can be used in supplying bibliographic and information assistance. The authors emphasize discussion of major reference tools; some titles of secondary importance are included. The primary audience remains library science students and practitioners who are new to the health sciences field or who are interested in reading background information on unfamiliar titles. The chapters cover organization of the reference collection, bibliographic sources for identifying monographs, periodicals, indexing and abstracting sources, electronic databases, government documents, and technical reports and conference literature. The section on information sources includes chapters on terminology, handbooks and manuals, drug information, media, statistics, directories and biographical sources, history-related tools, and grants. Useful arrangement and notations of tools are provided. One appendix is included on a complete and thorough reference collection policy to serve as a model for the reader. This book succeeds in introducing the student to a basic understanding and appreciation of reference sources. The descriptions are accurate and up-to-date, and the organization of the book makes it easy to locate desired information. The chapter on organizing and managing thereference collection is special in its unique attempt to raise issues about this important activity. The authors gave up the chapter on health legislation sources, a regret given the issue of heath care reform on this country' s horizon. The expanded chapter on media sources is an important contribution.
From The Critics
Reviewer: James Shedlock, AMLS (Northwestern University)
Description: Roper and Boorkman is the standard textbook for descriptions of major reference sources in the health sciences. This third edition provides updated descriptions, highlights changes in formats as a result of new technologies, and provides expanded coverage in place of deleted information.
Purpose: This book discusses reference work in a health sciences library by providing descriptions of various types of reference and information sources and how they can be used in supplying bibliographic and information assistance. The authors emphasize discussion of major reference tools; some titles of secondary importance are included.
Audience: The primary audience remains library science students and practitioners who are new to the health sciences field or who are interested in reading background information on unfamiliar titles.
Features: The chapters cover organization of the reference collection, bibliographic sources for identifying monographs, periodicals, indexing and abstracting sources, electronic databases, government documents, and technical reports and conference literature. The section on information sources includes chapters on terminology, handbooks and manuals, drug information, media, statistics, directories and biographical sources, history-related tools, and grants. Useful arrangement and notations of tools are provided. One appendix is included on a complete and thorough reference collection policy to serve as a model for the reader.
Assessment: This book succeeds in introducing the student to a basic understanding and appreciation of reference sources. The descriptions are accurate and up-to-date, and the organization of the book makes it easy to locate desired information. The chapter on organizing and managing the reference collection is special in its unique attempt to raise issues about this important activity. The authors gave up the chapter on health legislation sources, a regret given the issue of heath care reform on this country' s horizon. The expanded chapter on media sources is an important contribution.
Zom Zoms
It has been 10 years since the publication of the last edition of this work. While this edition follows the format of the first two, it brings health-science reference work into the age of technology. New users of this guide will find more than the title indicates. Basic tools are listed and described, but in addition, instruction in reference delivery and collection development is provided. The book is divided into three parts: reference collection, bibliographic sources, and information sources The reference-collection section is an in-depth discussion of the organization and management of a health-science reference collection. Topics covered include categories of reference tools, their selection and evaluation, collection development, and weeding policies. Part 2 is a guide to bibliographic sources. The six chapters cover monographs, periodicals, indexing and abstracting services, electronic bibliographic databases, government documents and technical reports, and conferences, reviews, and translations. The features of each electronic database are described as well as how it relates to print sources and how each functions in the reference setting. In addition, the databases are compared with one another in terms of scope, coverage, indexing, and search protocol The information-sources section is composed of chapters covering drug information sources; terminology; statistical, biographical, and historical sources; and tools for accessing grant information. A chapter on audiovisual material has been expanded to include microcomputer and multimedia sources This work is an excellent comprehensive introduction to health-sciences reference sources and their use. The description of sources, how they are used, and how they compare with one another provide valuable information to library-school students and health-sciences librarians. Librarians in public and academic libraries should also consider purchase for use in collection development and reference training.
Booknews
Discusses the various types of reference, bibliographic, and information sources in the health sciences and their uses for reference work. Dates are not noted for the first two editions, which are here updated to account for new or expanded electronic and online sources, including computer multimedia reference. Addressed to practicing and student librarians. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR booknews.com

5 Stars! from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780810824294
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/28/1984
  • Pages: 256

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