Introduction to Software Engineering Design: Processes, Principles and Patterns with UML2 / Edition 1

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Overview

The focus of Introduction to Software Engineering Design is the processes, principles and practices used to design software products. The discipline of design, generic design processes, and managing design are introduced in Part I. Part II covers software product design, use case modeling, and user interface design. Part III of the book is its core and covers enginnering data anyalysis, including conceptual modeling, and both architectural and detailed engineering design. This book is for anyone interested in learning software design.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780321410139
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 5/16/2006
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 720
  • Product dimensions: 7.48 (w) x 9.13 (h) x 1.57 (d)

Table of Contents

Part I

Introduction

Chapter 1

A Discipline of Software Engineering Design

1.1 What Is Software Design?

1.2 Varieties of Design

1.3 Software Design in the Life Cycle

1.4 Software Engineering Design Methods*

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 2

Software Design Processes and Management

2.1 Specifying Processes with UML Activity Diagrams

2.2 Software Design Processes

2.3 Software Design Management*

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Part II

Software Product Design

Chapter 3

Context of Software Product Design

3.1 Products and Markets

3.2 Product Planning

3.3 Project Mission Statement

3.4 Software Requirements Specification

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 4

Product Design Analysis

4.1 Product Design Process Overview

4.2 Needs Elicitation

4.3 Needs Documentation and Analysis

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 5

Product Design Resolution

5.1 Generating Alternative Requirements

5.2 Stating Requirements

5.3 Evaluating and Selecting Alternatives

5.4 Finalizing a Product Design

5.5 Prototyping

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 6

Designing with Use Cases

6.1 UML Use Case Diagrams

6.2 Use Case Descriptions

6.3 Use Case Models

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Part III

Software Engineering Design

Chapter 7

Engineering Design Analysis

7.1 Introduction to Engineering Design Analysis

7.2 UML Class and Object Diagrams

7.3 Making Conceptual Models

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 8

Engineering Design Resolution

8.1 Engineering Design Resolution Activities

8.2 Engineering Design Principles

8.3 Modularity Principles

8.4 Implementability and Aesthetic Principles

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 9

Architectural Design

9.1 Introduction to Architectural Design

9.2 Specifying Software Architectures

9.3 UML Package and Component Diagrams

9.4 UML Deployment Diagrams*

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 10

Architectural Design Resolution

10.1 Generating and Improving Software Architectures

10.2 Evaluating and Selecting Software Architectures

10.3 Finalizing Software Architectures

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 11

Static Mid-Level Object-Oriented Design: Class Models

11.1 Introduction to Detailed Design

11.2 Advanced UML Class Diagrams

11.3 Drafting a Class Model

11.4 Static Modeling Heuristics

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 12

Dynamic Mid-Level Object-Oriented Design: Interaction Models

12.1 UML Sequence Diagrams

12.2 Interaction Design Process

12.3 Interaction Modeling Heuristics

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 13

Dynamic Mid-Level State-Based Design: State Models

13.1 UML State Diagrams

13.2 Advanced UML State Diagrams*

13.3 Designing with State Diagrams

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 14

Low-Level Design

14.1 Visibility, Accessibility, and Information Hiding

14.2 Operation Specification

14.3 Algorithm and Data Structure Specification*

14.4 Design Finalization

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Part IV

Patterns in Software Design

Chapter 15

Architectural Styles

15.1 Patterns in Software Design

15.2 Layered Architectures

15.3 Other Architectural Styles

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 16

Mid-Level Object-Oriented Design Patterns

16.1 Collection Iteration

16.2 The Iterator Pattern

16.3 Mid-Level Design Pattern Categories

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 17

Broker Design Patterns

17.1 The Broker Category

17.2 The Fa├žade and Mediator Patterns

17.3 The Adapter Patterns

17.4 The Proxy Pattern*

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 18

Generator Design Patterns

18.1 The Generator Category

18.2 The Factory Patterns

18.3 The Singleton Pattern

18.4 The Prototype Pattern*

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Chapter 19

Reactor Design Patterns

19.1 The Reactor Category

19.2 The Command Pattern

19.3 The Observer Pattern

Further Reading, Exercises, Review Quiz Answers

Appendices

Appendix A

Glossary

Appendix B

AquaLush Case Study

Appendix C

References

Index

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