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An Introduction to the History of Educational Theories
     

An Introduction to the History of Educational Theories

by Oscar Browning
 

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An Introduction to the History of Educational Theories, first published in 1881, offers a comprehensive overview of the most notable approaches to education throughout Western history, from Athens and Rome to the Victorian public school. Exploring not only the still famous theories of Plato and Aristotle, this work also touches on techniques in education

Overview

An Introduction to the History of Educational Theories, first published in 1881, offers a comprehensive overview of the most notable approaches to education throughout Western history, from Athens and Rome to the Victorian public school. Exploring not only the still famous theories of Plato and Aristotle, this work also touches on techniques in education which are either no longer prevalent – Roman Oratory, the Jesuits – or in some cases were never widely adopted or appreciated: John Milton, for example. This title will be of value to those intrigued by the potential of past attitudes for present-day application, as well as to those unconvinced by contemporary approaches.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940023599922
Publisher:
Harper & brothers
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
366 KB

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER 111. HUMANISTIC EDUCATION. We have described the two principal educational systems of the Pagan world. Whatever effects the introduction of Christianity wrought, it was only to be expected that it should bring about a great change in the character of education. It recognised no difference between slave and free, it gave women an honourable position by the side of men, it considered the individual not as existing only for the benefit of the State, but laid stress on the personal relations between God and each of His creatures. It did not regard education as mainly of political importance, but estimated it by its bearing on the development of the spiritual life. It was natural that the Christian education should take at first an ecclesiastical character. The first pressing need was to provide ministrants of all grades for the service of the Church, and it was only as a favour that laymen were gradually allowed to partake of this instruction. But even in the age of the Fathers we find that the curriculum was not confined within these narrow limits. The Greeks were more liberal in their views than the Latins. The great Origen at Alexandria added philosophy, geometry, grammar, and rhetoric to the ecclesiastical course, and read with his pupils theGreek philosophers and poets. He used the method of dialectic, and taught his pupils by questions and answers, and encouraged them to pursue inquiry on their own account. But the crown and completion of the edifice lay in the interpretation of Holy Scripture, and in the explanation of the subtlest truths of Christianity. This interpretation was no mere analysis of the dead letter, but an attempt to penetrate into the living spirit. Onthe other hand, the Latin Fathers Tertullian, Cyprian, Jerome, and Augustine would have nothing ...

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