BN.com Gift Guide

Introduction to the Middle Way: Chandrakirti's Madhyamakavatara with Commentary by Ju Mipham [NOOK Book]

Introduction to the Middle Way: Chandrakirti's Madhyamakavatara with Commentary by Ju Mipham

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$16.49
BN.com price
(Save 44%)$29.95 List Price

Overview

Introduction
to the Middle Way

presents an adventure into the heart of Buddhist wisdom through the
Madhyamika,
or "middle way," teachings, which are designed to take the ordinary
intellect to the limit of its powers and then show that there is more.

This
book includes a verse translation of the
Madhyamakavatara
by the renowned seventh-century Indian master Chandrakirti, an extremely
influential text of Mahayana Buddhism, followed by an exhaustive logical
explanation of its meaning by the modern Tibetan master Jamgön Mipham,
composed approximately twelve centuries later. Chandrakirti's work is an
introduction to the Madhyamika teachings of Nagarjuna, which are themselves a
systematization of the
Prajnaparamita,
or "Perfection of Wisdom" literature, the sutras on the crucial but
elusive concept of emptiness.

Chandrakirti's
work has been accepted throughout Tibetan Buddhism as the highest expression of
the Buddhist view on the sutra level. With Jamgön Mipham's commentary, it
is a definitive presentation of the wisdom of emptiness, a central theme of
Buddhist teachings. This book is a core study text for both academic students
and practitioners of Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism.


Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780834824485
  • Publisher: Shambhala Publications, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/30/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 894,733
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Jamgön Mipham (1846–1912), one of the great luminaries of Tibetan Buddhism in modern times, has had a dominant and vitalizing influence on the Nyingma School and beyond. He was an important member of the Rimé, or nonsectarian movement, which did much to strengthen and preserve the entire tradition. A scholar of outstanding brilliance and versatility, his translated works are eagerly anticipated by English-language readers.

The Padmakara Translation Group, based in France, has a distinguished reputation for all its translations of Tibetan texts and teachings. Its work has been published in several languages and is renowned for its clear and accurate literary style.

Chandrakirti was a seventh-century Indian Buddhist philosopher, revered for his interpretation of Nagarjuna's teachings on the Middle Way.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword
by Jigme Khyentse Rinpoche

xiii

Translators'
Introduction

1

PART
ONE:
Madhyamakavatara
55

PART
TWO:
The
World of Chandra

115

The
Necklace of Spotless Crystal

A
Textual Outline of the Word of Chandra 117

Preamble
143

The
Ten Grounds or Stages of Realization 148

—The
First Ground: Perfect Joy 148

—The
Second Ground: Immaculate 153

—The
Third Ground: Luminous 156

—The
Fourth Ground: Radiant 160

—The
Fifth Ground: Hard to Keep 160

—The
Sixth Ground: Clearly Manifest 161

I.
Establishing
Emptiness by Rational Demonstration

165

A.
Using Reason to Disprove the Self of Phenomena 165

1.
Using reason to refute the theory of inherently real production 165

a)
A refutation of the four theories of production from the standpoint of the two
truths 165

(1)
Refutation of self-production 183

(2)
Refutation of other-production 187

(a)
A general refutation of other-production on the ultimate level 187

(b)
There is no naturally existent other-production, even conventionally 203

(c)
Refutation of the Chittamatra position 229

(3)
Refutation of production from both self and other 260

(4)
Refutation of uncaused production 261

b)
Replies to the objections against the refutation of the four theories of
production 266

2.
A reasoned demonstration that production is no more than dependent arising 278

3.
The result of analysis 279

B.
Using Reason to Disprove the Self of Persons 281

1.
Refutation of the belief that the self is a concrete entity 282

a)
A refutation of the belief that the personal self is different from the
aggregates 282

b)
A refutation of the belief that the self is identical with the aggregates 285

c)
A refutation of the belief that the self is indescribable 296

2.
The self is a mere dependent imputation 298

a)
Even though the self has no existence according to the sevenfold analysis, it
is dependently imputed, just like a chariot

b)
An adaptation to the phenomena in general of the arguments that demonstrate
that both the chariot and the self are mere imputations 304

II.
The
Categories of Emptiness Established by Reasoning

309

A.
A Detailed Categorization into Four Kinds of Emptiness 314

B.
An Abridged Classification into Four Kinds of Emptiness 322

—The
Seventh Ground: Far Progressed 324

—The
Eighth Ground: Immovable 325

—The
Ninth Ground: Perfect Intellect 328

—The
Tenth Ground: Cloud of Dharma 329

The
Qualities of the Ten Grounds 331

—An
exposition of the twelve groups of one hundred qualities that manifest on the
first ground 331

—The
adaptation of these qualities to the following grounds 332

The
Ultimate Ground of Buddhahood 334

—The
attainment of buddhahood 334

—What
is the goal, namely, buddhahood? 338

Conclusion
349

Notes
355

Glossary
383

Bibliography
393

Index
397


Supplementary
Discussions Appearing in the Text

1.
A discussion concerning true existence regarded as extraneous to phenomena 165

2.
The ultimate truth in itself and the approximate ultimate truth 192

3.
The valid establishment of phenomena 197

4.
What is refuted by absolutist reasoning? 205

5.
Further discussion concerning true existence considered as extraneous to
phenomena 208

6.
Disintegration as a positive entity 223

7.
The purpose of absolutist reasoning (continued) 238

8.
Phenomena as validly established by direct sense experience alone 241

9.
Do the Shravakas realize the no-self of phenomena? 310

10.
Extraneous true existence (continued) 314



Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)