An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language

An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language

by Michael Morris
     
 

This book is a critical introduction to the central issues of the philosophy of language. Each chapter focusses on one or two texts which have had a seminal influence on work in the subject, and uses these as a way of approaching both the central topics and the various traditions of dealing with them. Texts include classic writings by Frege, Russell, Kripke, Quine,… See more details below

Overview

This book is a critical introduction to the central issues of the philosophy of language. Each chapter focusses on one or two texts which have had a seminal influence on work in the subject, and uses these as a way of approaching both the central topics and the various traditions of dealing with them. Texts include classic writings by Frege, Russell, Kripke, Quine, Davidson, Austin, Grice and Wittgenstein. Theoretical jargon is kept to a minimum and is fully explained whenever it is introduced. The range of topics covered includes sense and reference, definite descriptions, proper names, natural-kind terms, de re and de dicto necessity, propositional attitudes, truth-theoretical approaches to meaning, radical interpretation, indeterminacy of translation, speech acts, intentional theories of meaning, and scepticism about meaning. The book will be invaluable to students and to all readers who are interested in the nature of linguistic meaning.

About the Author:
Michael Morris is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Sussex

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521603119
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
12/28/2006
Series:
Cambridge Introductions to Philosophy Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
334
Product dimensions:
6.85(w) x 9.72(h) x 0.75(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents


Acknowledgements     ix
Introduction     1
Locke and the nature of language     5
Introduction     5
What Locke says     5
Meaning and signification     9
Problems about communication     10
Words and sentences     14
Locke's less disputed assumptions     18
Frege on Sense and reference     21
Introduction     21
Psychologism and the Context Principle     22
Frege and logic     26
Frege's mature system (i): reference     28
Frege's mature system (ii): Sense     32
Two further uses of the notion of Sense     36
Questions about Sense     40
Sense and the Basic Worry     47
Russell on definite descriptions     49
Introduction     49
The problems     50
Russell's solution in outline     53
Russell's solution in detail     55
Strawson on definite descriptions     61
Donnellan on referential and attributive uses of descriptions     63
Russellian defences     66
Russell beyond descriptions     70
Kripke on proper names     74
Introduction     74
Kripke's target     76
Kripke's objections (i): simple considerations     78
Kripke's objections (ii): epistemic and modal considerations     80
Defences of the description theory     85
Sense and direct reference     90
Conclusion     92
Natural-kind terms     94
Introduction     94
A Lockean view of natural-kind terms: the individualist version     96
A Lockean view without individualism     102
How can there be Kripke-Putnam natural-kind terms?     105
How can natural-kind terms be rigid designators?     108
Quine on de re and de dicto modality     113
Introduction     113
Quine's three grades of modal involvement     114
Referential opacity and Leibniz's law     118
Referential opacity and the three grades     121
Quine's logical problem with de re modality     126
Quine's metaphysical worries about de re modality     130
Reference and propositional attitudes     134
Introduction     134
Quine's problem     135
Quine's proposed solution     138
Perry and the essential indexical      145
The problems for Quine's solution     147
Consequences     150
The semantics of propositional attitudes     152
Introduction     152
Kripke, names, necessity and propositional attitudes     153
Kripke's Pierre     155
Referential solutions to the puzzle     158
A Fregean response     163
Davidson's proposal     166
Can Davidson's proposal solve Kripke's puzzle?     169
Davidson on truth and meaning     173
Introduction     173
Meanings as entities     175
Tarski's 'definition' of truth     179
Davidson's use of Tarski     183
The obvious objections to Davidson's proposal     187
Truth and the possibility of general semantics     189
One final worry     191
Quine and Davidson on translation and interpretation     194
Introduction     194
Quine and radical translation     195
Davidson and radical interpretation     198
Statements of meaning and prepositional attitudes     202
Theories of meaning and speakers' knowledge     205
How fundamental is radical interpretation?     210
Quine on the indeterminacy of translation     214
Introduction     214
Two dogmas of empiricism'     215
Indeterminacy and inscrutability     219
Resisting Quine on indeterminacy: some simple ways     228
Austin on speech acts     231
Introduction     231
Performative utterances     232
Towards a general theory of speech acts     234
Truth and performatives     239
Issues for a theory of speech acts     242
Grice on meaning     248
Introduction     248
Grice's overall strategy     249
Sympathetic objections to Grice's account of speaker-meaning     253
Sympathetic objections to Grice's account of expression-meaning     258
An unsympathetic objection to Grice's account of expression-meaning     261
An unsympathetic objection to Grice's account of speaker-meaning     264
After Grice     268
Kripke on the rule-following paradox     271
Introduction     271
The sceptical challenge     272
The 'sceptical solution'     277
A community-based response     283
Can dispositionalism be defended?     284
Anti-reductionism and radical interpretation      287
Wittgenstein on the Augustinian picture     292
Introduction     292
The Augustinian picture     293
The Anti-Metaphysical interpretation     295
The Quasi-Kantian interpretation     299
Worries about these Wittgensteinian views     308
Glossary     312
Works cited     316
Index     323

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >