Introduction to the Study of Theology

Introduction to the Study of Theology

by James Drummond
     
 

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judgment, to discipline your thought, to enlarge your views, and to train your faculty for conducting original research and drawing independent conclusions. Form the highest…  See more details below

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
judgment, to discipline your thought, to enlarge your views, and to train your faculty for conducting original research and drawing independent conclusions. Form the highest ideal that you can of the scholar's vocation, and endeavour in your own persons to make that vocation worthy of respect. Section III. Principles of Theological Study. These remarks lead me to speak more particularly of the College where, for the present, your studies are to be carried on, and of the principles on which it is based. We shall perhaps better apprehend the purpose of a theological College, and the principles which it ought to follow, if for a few moments we consider its relation to that larger institution which seems dedicated to kindred aims,—I mean the Church. If we regard the Church simply in its social aspect, as an agency intended to have a religious effect upoa mankind, we may say that its primary aim is to train the religious life, to quicken the higher affections and ennoble the conduct, while that of the College on the other hand is to train religious thought, and impart information in regard to religious subjects. Neither of these aims can, I believe, be carried out independently of the other; but the relative order in which they are placed must seriously affect the practical arrangementsof the two institutions which adopt them. The most salient feature of the Church consists of the public services of religion, in which worship is offered, and the accepted teaching of a spiritual faith and a lofty morality is pressed home to the heart and conscience. Now for such services to have their due efficacy it is practically needful that there should be a large amount of intellectual agreement in the congregation. Whatever tends to excite the critical faculty or provoke the repugnance o...

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ISBN-13:
2940025816881
Publisher:
Macmillan and co.
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
426 KB

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judgment, to discipline your thought, to enlarge your views, and to train your faculty for conducting original research and drawing independent conclusions. Form the highest ideal that you can of the scholar's vocation, and endeavour in your own persons to make that vocation worthy of respect. Section III. Principles of Theological Study. These remarks lead me to speak more particularly of the College where, for the present, your studies are to be carried on, and of the principles on which it is based. We shall perhaps better apprehend the purpose of a theological College, and the principles which it ought to follow, if for a few moments we consider its relation to that larger institution which seems dedicated to kindred aims,—I mean the Church. If we regard the Church simply in its social aspect, as an agency intended to have a religious effect upoa mankind, we may say that its primary aim is to train the religious life, to quicken the higher affections and ennoble the conduct, while that of the College on the other hand is to train religious thought, and impart information in regard to religious subjects. Neither of these aims can, I believe, be carried out independently of the other; but the relative order in which they are placed must seriously affect the practical arrangementsof the two institutions which adopt them. The most salient feature of the Church consists of the public services of religion, in which worship is offered, and the accepted teaching of a spiritual faith and a lofty morality is pressed home to the heart and conscience. Now for such services to have their due efficacy it is practically needful that there should be a large amount of intellectualagreement in the congregation. Whatever tends to excite the critical faculty or provoke the repugnance o...

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