Inventing a Voice: The Rhetoric of American First Ladies of the Twentieth Century

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$52.95
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $49.96
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 5%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (5) from $49.96   
  • New (5) from $49.96   

Overview

Inventing a Voice is a comprehensive work on the lives and communication of twentieth-century first ladies. Using a rhetorical framework, the contributors look at the speaking, writing, media coverage and interaction, and visual rhetoric of American first ladies from Ida Saxton McKinley to Laura Bush. The women's rhetorical devices varied—some practiced a rhetoric without words, while others issued press releases, gave speeches, and met with various constituencies. All used interpersonal or social rhetoric to support their husbands' relationships with world leaders, party officials, boosters, and the public. Featuring an extensive introduction and chapter on the 'First Lady as a Site of 'American Womanhood,'' Wertheimer has gathered a collection that includes the post-White House musings of many first ladies, capturing their reflections on public expectations and perceived restrictions on their communication.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

CHOICE
This collection offers new insights into the private and personal lives of America's First Ladies through an examination of their rhetorical discourse and image. Essential.
Rhetoric and Public Affairs
By utilizing both traditional and alternative approaches to the study of mass communcation, the authors reveal the complexities of political outreach and exchange as conducted by the presidents' wives. First ladies, these authors maintain, have invented their voices with throught and care. They have not chosen simply between speech and silence, but rather among a diverse array of messages, means, and audiences.
— MaryAnne Borrelli, Conneticut College
Choice
This collection offers new insights into the private and personal lives of America's First Ladies through an examination of their rhetorical discourse and image. Essential.
Myra G. Gutin
Molly Meijer Wertheimer's Inventing A Voice is an excellent addition to the first lady research shelf. Addressing an area not usually examined by first lady historians, this ambitious book examines the rhetorical discourse of first ladies from Ida McKinley to Laura Bush. The essays are interesting and well-researched and provide perspective on the most difficult unpaid job in America.
Rhetoric & Public Affairs - MaryAnne Borrelli
By utilizing both traditional and alternative approaches to the study of mass communcation, the authors reveal the complexities of political outreach and exchange as conducted by the presidents' wives. First ladies, these authors maintain, have invented their voices with throught and care. They have not chosen simply between speech and silence, but rather among a diverse array of messages, means, and audiences.
Robert P. Watson
This book is a worthy and long-overdue addition to the growing base of scholarly literature on the first ladies. Wertheimer is to be commended for bringing together probing, original essays on every first lady of the twentieth century that examine the rhetorical styles and communication of those occupying this most dynamic and challenging 'office.' I enthusiastically recommend it to scholars of the presidency, communication, media studies, and women's studies, and also believe the book would make a fine supplemental text for the classroom, as students will find it to be quite readable and approachable!
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780742529717
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/28/2004
  • Series: Communication, Media, and Politics Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 500
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.11 (d)

Meet the Author

Molly Meijer Wertheimer is professor of speech communications and affiliate associate professor of women's studies at Pennsylvania State University, Hazelton.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Editor's Introduction: First Ladies' Fundamental Rhetorical Choices: When to Speak? What to Say? When to Remain Silent? Chapter 2 1 The First Lady: A Site of "American Womanhood" Chapter 3 2 Ida Saxton McKinley: Indomitable Spirit or Autocrat of the Sick Bed Chapter 4 3 Edith Kermit Roosevelt: First Lady, First Mommy Chapter 5 4 Helen Herron Taft: Opportunity and Ambition Chapter 6 5 Ellen Axson Wilson: A Rhetorical Reassessment of a Forgotten First Lady Chapter 7 6 Edith Bolling Galt Wilson: Actions Speak Louder than Words Chapter 8 7 Florence Kling Harding: Bridging Traditional and Modern Rhetorical Roles Chapter 9 8 Grace Goodhue Coolidge: Articulating Virtue Chapter 10 9 Lou Henry Hoover: Mining the Possibilities as Leader and First Lady Chapter 11 10 Eleanor Roosevelt: A Rhetorical Reconstruction of First Ladydom Chapter 12 11 Bess Wallace Truman: "The Boss" from Independence Chapter 13 12 Mamie Geneva Doud Eisenhower: Reflecting the Mood of the Nation Chapter 14 13 Jacqueline Kennedy: The Rhetorical Construction of Camelot Chapter 15 14 Lady Bird Johnson: The Making of a Public First Lady with Private Influence Chapter 16 15 Pat Nixon: Wisdom to Know the Difference Chapter 17 16 Betty Ford: A Certain Comfort From a Candid First Lady Chapter 18 17 Rosalynn Carter: Crafting a Presidential Partnership Rhetorically Chapter 19 18 Nancy Reagan: Leading Lady, Supporting Actress, or Bit Player Chapter 20 19 Barbara Bush: Her Rhetorical Development and Appeal Chapter 21 20 Hillary Rodham Clinton: Using Her Vital Voice Chapter 22 Epilogue: Laura Bush: Using the "Magic of Words" to Educate and Advocate

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)