Inventing the Job of President: Leadership Style from George Washington to Andrew Jackson

Hardcover (Print)
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$11.74
(Save 41%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $3.86
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 80%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (19) from $3.86   
  • New (9) from $8.98   
  • Used (10) from $3.86   

Overview

From George Washington's decision to buy time for the new nation by signing the less-than-ideal Jay Treaty with Great Britain in 1795 to George W. Bush's order of a military intervention in Iraq in 2003, the matter of who is president of the United States is of the utmost importance. In this book, Fred Greenstein examines the leadership styles of the earliest presidents, men who served at a time when it was by no means certain that the American experiment in free government would succeed.

In his groundbreaking book The Presidential Difference, Greenstein evaluated the personal strengths and weaknesses of the modern presidents since Franklin D. Roosevelt. Here, he takes us back to the very founding of the republic to apply the same yardsticks to the first seven presidents from Washington to Andrew Jackson, giving his no-nonsense assessment of the qualities that did and did not serve them well in office. For each president, Greenstein provides a concise history of his life and presidency, and evaluates him in the areas of public communication, organizational capacity, political skill, policy vision, cognitive style, and emotional intelligence. Washington, for example, used his organizational prowess—honed as a military commander and plantation owner—to lead an orderly administration. In contrast, John Adams was erudite but emotionally volatile, and his presidency was an organizational disaster.

Inventing the Job of President explains how these early presidents and their successors shaped the American presidency we know today and helped the new republic prosper despite profound challenges at home and abroad.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Civilian Reader
Greenstein does an excellent job of providing short biographies of each president covered, as well as placing their presidencies into the context of their times, making this book a no-nonsense guide to the characters of these seven presidents, and an examination of the characteristics that the author believes served them well and poorly during their time in office. An interesting addition to the study of the presidency, I would recommend Inventing the Job of President.
— Stefan Fergus
Choice
In this brief text, eminent scholar Greenstein examines the role the first seven presidents of the U.S. played in establishing the presidency as an institution.
Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
This fine volume will prove interesting for scholars of the presidency, but its accessible style and fluid prose make it ideal for the undergraduate and general reader as well. Highly recommended.
— David A. Crockett
CEU Political Science Journal
[E]legant and clear . . . a captivating and . . . easy-to-digest lecture. . . . Inventing the Job of President is a valuable resource for both presidential scholars and for those who had ever read anything about the subject.
— Mihail Chiru
Political Studies Review
The book's obvious originality lies in Greenstein's application of a single framework to the leadership styles of the early presidents. In so doing, the book usefully brings together information in a systematic way, emphasizing the enduring features of political leadership in any epoch and whetting the reader's appetite to know more about the subject. It is a relatively inexpensive book, and students and general readers will find it an accessible introduction to the early presidency. Seasoned scholars will find the book more useful as a comparative analysis of the early presidents. It is certainly a book that every presidential scholar will want to read.
Civilian Reader - Stefan Fergus
Greenstein does an excellent job of providing short biographies of each president covered, as well as placing their presidencies into the context of their times, making this book a no-nonsense guide to the characters of these seven presidents, and an examination of the characteristics that the author believes served them well and poorly during their time in office. An interesting addition to the study of the presidency, I would recommend Inventing the Job of President.
Register of the Kentucky Historical Society - David A. Crockett
This fine volume will prove interesting for scholars of the presidency, but its accessible style and fluid prose make it ideal for the undergraduate and general reader as well. Highly recommended.
CEU Political Science Journal - Mihail Chiru
[E]legant and clear . . . a captivating and . . . easy-to-digest lecture. . . . Inventing the Job of President is a valuable resource for both presidential scholars and for those who had ever read anything about the subject.
Civilian Reader
Greenstein does an excellent job of providing short biographies of each president covered, as well as placing their presidencies into the context of their times, making this book a no-nonsense guide to the characters of these seven presidents, and an examination of the characteristics that the author believes served them well and poorly during their time in office. An interesting addition to the study of the presidency, I would recommend Inventing the Job of President.
— Stefan Fergus
Library Journal
In his career, Greenstein (politics, emeritus, Princeton; The Presidential Difference) has examined the presidency as closely, critically, and convincingly as any recent presidential scholar. He is especially known for scrutinizing strengths and weaknesses in public communication, organizational capacity, political skill, policy vision, cognitive style, and emotional intelligence. While he has previously analyzed modern U.S. Presidents, here in this concise yet insightful volume he analyzes our first seven leaders, demonstrating effectively their similarities and differences that support his central thesis that, at any given time, it matters who happens to be President. None has had the same personal and political skills. Greenstein's approach, emphasizing particular (and at times rather idiosyncratic) personal strengths and weaknesses, is distinct from Stephen Skowronek's The Politics That Presidents Make, which focuses more on the political environment and the times in which various Presidents served. Greenstein here helps students of the presidency realize that not all Presidents are created equal, and that leadership style clearly matters. VERDICT This latest addition to the Greenstein corpus will find a receptive audience in scholars of the Presidency and those interested in leadership and American political history. Highly recommended.—Stephen K. Shaw, Northwest Nazarene Univ., Nampa, ID
From the Publisher

"Greenstein does an excellent job of providing short biographies of each president covered, as well as placing their presidencies into the context of their times, making this book a no-nonsense guide to the characters of these seven presidents, and an examination of the characteristics that the author believes served them well and poorly during their time in office. An interesting addition to the study of the presidency, I would recommend Inventing the Job of President."--Stefan Fergus, Civilian Reader

"This fine volume will prove interesting for scholars of the presidency, but its accessible style and fluid prose make it ideal for the undergraduate and general reader as well. Highly recommended."--David A. Crockett, Register of the Kentucky Historical Society

"[E]legant and clear . . . a captivating and . . . easy-to-digest lecture. . . . Inventing the Job of President is a valuable resource for both presidential scholars and for those who had ever read anything about the subject."--Mihail Chiru, CEU Political Science Journal

"The book's obvious originality lies in Greenstein's application of a single framework to the leadership styles of the early presidents. In so doing, the book usefully brings together information in a systematic way, emphasizing the enduring features of political leadership in any epoch and whetting the reader's appetite to know more about the subject. It is a relatively inexpensive book, and students and general readers will find it an accessible introduction to the early presidency. Seasoned scholars will find the book more useful as a comparative analysis of the early presidents. It is certainly a book that every presidential scholar will want to read."--Political Studies Review

"This latest addition to the Greenstein corpus will find a receptive audience in scholars of the Presidency and those interested in leadership and American political history. Highly recommended."--Stephen K. Shaw, Library Journal

"In this brief text, eminent scholar Greenstein examines the role the first seven presidents of the U.S. played in establishing the presidency as an institution."--Choice

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691133584
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 8/10/2009
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 1,305,550
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Fred I. Greenstein is professor of politics emeritus at Princeton University. His books include "The Presidential Difference: Leadership Style from FDR to Barack Obama" (Princeton); "The Hidden-Hand Presidency: Eisenhower as Leader"; and "How Presidents Test Reality: Decisions on Vietnam, 1954 and 1965".
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations ix

Chapter 1: The Presidential Difference in the Early Republic 1

Chapter 2: The Foundational Presidency of George Washington 9

Chapter 3: John Adams: Absentee Chief Executive 25

Chapter 4: Thomas Jefferson and the Art of Governance 35

Chapter 5: The Anticlimactic Presidency of James Madison 51

Chapter 6: The Political Competence of James Monroe 63

Chapter 7: The Political Incompetence of John Quincy Adams 75

Chapter 8: Andrew Jackson: Force of Nature 85

Chapter 9: Presidents, Leadership Qualities, and Political Development 96

Appendix Background on the Early Presidencies 105

Notes 123

Further Reading 137

Acknowledgments 151

Index 153

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)