×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Investment Leadership: A Guide to Best Practices / Edition 1
     

Investment Leadership: A Guide to Best Practices / Edition 1

5.0 1
by Jim Ware, Beth Michaels, Dale Primer
 

ISBN-10: 0471453331

ISBN-13: 9780471453338

Pub. Date: 10/17/2003

Publisher: Wiley

A comprehensive guide to best practices within the investment industry
Investment Leadership provides readers with the tools to understand the leadership factors that contribute to sustainable growth; diagnose their firm's culture and understand why it is important; and replicate best practices from leading firms. With the help of diagnostic tools, practical

Overview

A comprehensive guide to best practices within the investment industry
Investment Leadership provides readers with the tools to understand the leadership factors that contribute to sustainable growth; diagnose their firm's culture and understand why it is important; and replicate best practices from leading firms. With the help of diagnostic tools, practical advice from industry leaders, and real-life case studies, this book sets out to explain what is wrong with the status quo and reveal the secrets of long-term success in the investment industry.
James W. Ware, CFA, currently works as a consultant to money managers. He is the coauthor of The Leadership Genius of George W. Bush (0-471-42006-9). Beth Michaels has worked with many organizations, including Chevrolet Motors and the McDonald's Corporation. Dale Primer has worked with business executives from more than 700 individual businesses in over eighty-five separate industries.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471453338
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
10/17/2003
Series:
Wiley Finance Series , #203
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.48(h) x 1.18(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

PART ONE: Foundation Pieces: Cornerstones of Long-Term Success.

CHAPTER 1: Leadership and Culture in the Investment Industry.

CHAPTER 2: Core Values.

CHAPTER 3: Vision: Where Are We Going?

CHAPTER 4: Strong Cultures.

PART TWO: Assessment Tools: Putting Numbers to the Soft Stuff.

CHAPTER 5: Leader Types.

CHAPTER 6: Measuring Culture.

CHAPTER 7: Diagnosing Culture by Measuring Values.

CHAPTER 8: Leadership and Trust.

PART THREE: Getting Practical: Specific Tools for Improvement.

CHAPTER 9: Ambitious Goals and Implementation.

CHAPTER 10: The Innovative Culture.

CHAPTER 11: Compensation and Ownership.

CHAPTER 12: Homegrown Leadership.

PART FOUR: Putting It All Together: Case Study.

CHAPTER 13: The Best of the Best: Ariel Capital.

CHAPTER 14: Continuous Improvement.

PART FIVE: Other Audiences.

CHAPTER 15: Consultant’s View..

CHAPTER 16: Stock Picker’s Corner: Rounding up the Un-Usual Suspects.

NOTES.

INDEX.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Investment Leadership: A Guide to Best Practices 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Investment firms confront a world of change. Yet many of them have managerial cultures that are ill suited for that confrontation. Author Jim Ware, writing with Beth Michaels and Dale Primer, exposes 10 myths of investment firm management, and shows managers what it takes to build a strong, successful management culture. The authors seem generous and humble, drawing examples from and crediting the work of numerous management authorities. The book does not break new ground, but rather it summarizes, compiles and restates what has been said elsewhere. The authors¿ approach is frank, straightforward and anecdotal. Their focus on the book¿s target market - investment firm managers - is tight and unvarying. Only in the last chapter do they stray from that focus, restating a number of criteria that investors might use to evaluate stocks on the basis of corporate culture. One suspects that the authors might have included this chapter at the urging of an editor eager to expand, if only incrementally, the readership for the book. If so, we believe the editor should have been content with how precisely the book serves its intended audience.