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Invisible Cities
     

Invisible Cities

4.0 25
by Italo Calvino, John Lee (Narrated by)
 

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In a garden sit the aged Kublai Khan and the young Marco Polo--Tartar emperor and Venetian traveler. Kublai Khan has sensed the end of his empire coming soon. Marco Polo diverts the emperor with tales of the cities he has seen in his travels around the empire: cities and memory, cities and desire, cities and designs, cities and the dead, cities and the sky, trading

Overview

In a garden sit the aged Kublai Khan and the young Marco Polo--Tartar emperor and Venetian traveler. Kublai Khan has sensed the end of his empire coming soon. Marco Polo diverts the emperor with tales of the cities he has seen in his travels around the empire: cities and memory, cities and desire, cities and designs, cities and the dead, cities and the sky, trading cities, hidden cities. Soon it becomes clear that each of these fantastic places is really the same place.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Audio
11/25/2013
At its most basic level, Calvino’s novel is a conversation between Marco Polo and Kublai Khan, as the former describes the fantastical cities and landscapes he’s visited during his explorations. Of course, this is severely understating the scope of Calvino’s book, which at times feels like a novel, at times like a travelogue about a voyage to mysterious and imaginary places, and at times like a series of puzzles. John Lee is the perfect performer to depict the disorienting nature of Calvino’s masterpiece. Lee has become the go-to narrator for stories with unusual structures and ideas—he previously narrated China Mieville’s The City & the City and David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas. In this audio edition, Lee’s clipped, accented elocution encapsulates the mystery that permeates the novel’s numerous settings. But Lee also adds interesting details throughout his reading—for instance he beautifully captures Marco Polo’s charisma and showmanship as he crows about his findings to Khan. Despite narrating a book with no discernible plot, this is a truly entertaining and electrifying performance. A Harcourt Brace Jovanovich paperback. (June)
Gore Vidal
Of all tasks, describing the contents of a book is the most difficult and in the case of a marvelous invention like Invisible Cities, perfectly irrelevant.
New York Review of Books
From the Publisher
"Of all tasks, describing the contents of a book is the most difficult and in the case of a marvelous invention like Invisible Cities, perfectly irrelevant." —Gore Vidal, The New York Review of Books

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781452614489
Publisher:
Tantor Media, Inc.
Publication date:
06/24/2013
Edition description:
Unabridged CD
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 5.50(h) x 1.20(d)

Meet the Author

Italo Calvino (1923-1985) was an Italian journalist and writer of short stories and novels. His best known works include the Our Ancestors trilogy, the short story collection Cosmicomics, and the novels Invisible Cities and If on a Winter's Night a Traveler.

John Lee has read audiobooks in almost every conceivable genre, from Charles Dickens to Patrick O'Brian, and from the very real life of Napoleon to the entirely imagined lives of sorcerers and swashbucklers. An AudioFile Golden Voice narrator, he is the winner of numerous Audie Awards and AudioFile Earphones Awards.

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Invisible Cities 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
christy_wooke More than 1 year ago
Really good. I was hesitant at first because it seems very academic, but I loved it. It's a supposed conversation between Kublai Khan and Marco Polo about cities they've seen (or not).
Guest More than 1 year ago
Calvino uses Marco Polo and Kublai Khan in a way to discuss the 'real' reality. Are the cities real? Are the characters real? I had a grin on my face during the entire read. Recommended to those who enjoy the surreal.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Easily the first book by Calvino I would recommend to someone. Simply his most lyrical, enchanting book, hands down. Not only is it worth a read simply to enjoy the images he evokes through incredibly spare prose, but the ideas he suggests through the dialogue between Kublai Khan and Marco Polo are philosophically intriguing, as well.
lit-in-the-last-frontier More than 1 year ago
INVISIBLE CITIES by Italo Calvino ??? I so wanted to love this book, but it took me over two months just to finish it despite its short length. That is not to say it was all bad! Calvino's structure is that of Marco Polo recounting for Kublai Khan brief vignettes about various cities and towns through which he has supposedly passed on his travels. I couldn't help but marvel at the sheer imaginative power it must have taken to create so many places, and I give props to Calvino for that. In addition, his prose is wonderful, with paragraphs frequently taking unexpected twists at the end. Many sentient points about human nature-points which transcend time and culture-were subtly inserted, and lent the book an added soulful element. Two things gave me grief. First, despite the marvelous variety of locales, an entire book of city descriptions grew redundant very quickly. The author's creativity and prose carried me happily through about the first six or eight cities, and then the subject matter began to flag. The second aspect was the magical realism employed in the book. Mention of objects such as sky scrapers, carousel horses, and underground trains, which did not exist in the era in which the book was written, offended the historian in me. Rather than fantastical, they just felt like poor fact checking to me. By the end of the book, entire modern cities, in countries yet to be discovered, began appearing in Kublai Khan's atlas; it all rang very inconceivable to me. I have decided that books in which characters travel back in time and bring modern knowledge and objects with them delight me, but books in which knowledge of technology and modern devices appear long before their advent simply feel jarring. Had I read one of these pieces, individually, in a magazine or blog, I would likely have been full of compliments. For the most part, the book simply did not work for me because it was too much of the same.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
How to describe "Invisible Cities"? Mosaics, jewels, impressions, photo shots, treasure box, puzzles,... A reader has to bare her chest in order to wear in the exquisite language and magical realistic rhetoric Italo Calvino has produced in this little book.
Janus More than 1 year ago
I really wanted to love this book. When I started reading it I wanted to just devour it and be able to declare Italo Calvino one of my favorite authors. When I read the synopsis' for his novels I find myself intrigued by them all. Unfortunately, this book is a bit of a let down. Calvino was a smart author. Perhaps too smart. I'm not a stranger to metaphysical concepts but at times I got the distinct impression that the only person who knew what Calvino was talking about was Calvino. I felt like the actual meat of the book was found in the segments featuring Marco Polo and Kublai Khan, which were few and took up about twenty pages total. I will also mention that Calvino's writing style is very soft. He is a talented writer, but his way with words had a tendency to put me to sleep, even during two page chapters. Coming from someone who enjoys classic literature, that is really saying something. Though I think I will try to read perhaps one more of his books, I can safely say that Italo Calvino is not my new favorite author. Even Gore Vidal couldn't describe this book (though I have a feeling he had no idea what happened but just didn't want to admit it). If you're feeling extremely experimental and risky, then by all means give this book a shot, but if your mind is prone to wandering while reading then perhaps you should read something else.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Calvino had an enchanting fantasy which allowed him to paint images like the ones you can find in this book. Every city has the name of a woman and it's described as a living creature, with its inner contradictions and limits but also its creativity and desire to live.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Invisible cities is a study of the aesthetic and ideal that makes one believe that humanity's contribution to the universe is to build and create dreams.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Calvino's writing is magical. Of all the books I've read by him, this might be my favorite. A vision of what is invisible in cities, in life.
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