Invisible Inkling

( 2 )

Overview

The thing about Hank's new friend Inkling is, he's invisible.

No, not imaginary. Inkling is an invisible bandapat, a creature native only to the Peruvian Woods of Mystery. (Or maybe it is the Ukrainian glaciers. Inkling hardly ever gets his stories straight.)

Now Inkling has found his way to Brooklyn and into Hank's laundry basket on his quest for squash—bandapats' favorite food. But Hank has bigger problems than helping Inkling fend off maniac...

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Invisible Inkling

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Overview

The thing about Hank's new friend Inkling is, he's invisible.

No, not imaginary. Inkling is an invisible bandapat, a creature native only to the Peruvian Woods of Mystery. (Or maybe it is the Ukrainian glaciers. Inkling hardly ever gets his stories straight.)

Now Inkling has found his way to Brooklyn and into Hank's laundry basket on his quest for squash—bandapats' favorite food. But Hank has bigger problems than helping Inkling fend off maniac doggies and search for yummy pumpkins: Bruno Gillicut is a lunch-stealing dirtbug caveperson and he's got to be stopped. And who better to help stand up to a bully than an invisible friend?

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Hank Wolowitz isn't sure he can face fourth grade now that his best friend has moved away. But in Jenkins's (Toy Dance Party) thoughtfully grounded, gently kooky chapter book, Hank finds surprising new allies that help him deal with the pain of his loss and with a school bully. An ordinary day at Hank's family's Brooklyn ice cream shop becomes an unforgettable one when Hank reaches for a long-lost Lego propeller under the kitchen sink and discovers something soft, furry—and invisible. Turns out the creature is an invisible "bandapat" named Inkling from "the Peruvian Woods of Mystery." Or maybe Ukraine. When Hank saves Inkling from the neighbor's dog, the critter vows to repay the favor. Inkling's presence, along with his large appetite and hankering for squash, puts Hank in some humorous tight spots. Jenkins colors her mostly realistic tale with enough bits of mystery and silliness to hold readers' attention. Even those who don't know what to make of Inkling can appreciate that Hank's sentiments and actions always ring true. Final art not seen by PW. Ages 7–10. (May)
Sara Pennypacker
INVISIBLE INKLING is charming, fresh, and funny. Now I want an invisible friend of my own!
Paul O. Zelinsky
“I love INVISIBLE INKLING, so funny and satisfying and yet poised for the next installment.”
School Library Journal
Gr 2–4—Hank is about to start school without his best friend, who has moved from Brooklyn to Iowa. While reaching for a lost Lego piece under a sink in his parents' ice-cream store, the fourth grader discovers something furry, warm, and invisible. The creature introduces himself as Inkling, an invisible bandapat native to the Peruvian Woods of Mystery. The only one of his kind left, he has come in search of squash, the food he needs to survive, having noticed a newspaper ad for Hank's family's shop, the Big Round Pumpkin. Inkling often tells lies, so Hank is not sure what to believe. Feeling uneasy about facing school without his buddy, he invites Inkling along, and the bandapat helps him to deal with a bully who steals the best parts of his lunch. Bliss's humorous cartoon illustrations help move the story along. Young chapter-book readers will relate to Hank's predicament, enjoy his wild imagination, and wonder whether Inkling is real until the very end.—Kris Hickey, Columbus Metropolitan Library, OH
Booklist
“A mix of wild humor, fantasy, and sadness, this series starter offers a moving story about defeating bullies. The story will grab readers with its comedy and captivating sidekick.”
School Library Journal
Gr 2–4—Hank is about to start school without his best friend, who has moved from Brooklyn to Iowa. While reaching for a lost Lego piece under a sink in his parents' ice-cream store, the fourth grader discovers something furry, warm, and invisible. The creature introduces himself as Inkling, an invisible bandapat native to the Peruvian Woods of Mystery. The only one of his kind left, he has come in search of squash, the food he needs to survive, having noticed a newspaper ad for Hank's family's shop, the Big Round Pumpkin. Inkling often tells lies, so Hank is not sure what to believe. Feeling uneasy about facing school without his buddy, he invites Inkling along, and the bandapat helps him to deal with a bully who steals the best parts of his lunch. Bliss's humorous cartoon illustrations help move the story along. Young chapter-book readers will relate to Hank's predicament, enjoy his wild imagination, and wonder whether Inkling is real until the very end.—Kris Hickey, Columbus Metropolitan Library, OH
Kirkus Reviews
Nine-year-old Hank Wolowitz fears the prospect of fourth grade at New York's PS 166 without friends—his best friend Alexander just moved away (against his will). Sasha Chin from downstairs doesn't really count as a friend, because she has three good girl friends she hangs out with half the time. When Hank reaches for a Lego piece under the sink of his family's ice-cream shop, Big Round Pumpkin, and feels fur where it shouldn't be and days later sees a waffle cone disappear bite by bite, he knows something is fishy. After Rootbeer, the neighbor's dog, goes bananas barking at nothing in the hallway, Hank discovers he has accidentally saved an invisible, furry Bandapat named Inkling. Inkling, who loves squash and can be a stranger to the truth, feels he owes Hank a debt and must stick around until he can save Hank's life. An opportunity for that just might arise, since bully Bruno Gillicut has decided that Hank annoys him and must pay by forking over his dessert at lunch every day. Jenkins' possible series starter (given the hints at the close) is a gently humorous and nicely realistic (with the obvious exception of the invisible Peruvian Bandapat) tale about coping with the loss of a lifelong best friend. (The book will feature Bliss' signature black-and-white illustrations, but no art was available at the time of review.) Anyone who who has ever had an imaginary friend will appreciate sassy Inkling (who's invisible—not imaginary). (Fantasy. 7-10)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061802225
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/24/2012
  • Series: Invisible Inkling Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 234,813
  • Age range: 6 - 10 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Emily Jenkins is the author of two previous books about Hank and Inkling. She also wrote the chapter books Toys Go Out, Toy Dance Party, and Toys Come Home, plus a lot of picture books, including Lemonade in Winter, That New Animal, and Skunkdog. She bakes excellent pumpkin bread and, when swimming, wears a purple swim cap and blue goggles.

Harry Bliss is the New York Times bestselling artist of Diary of a Worm, Diary of a Spider, and Diary of a Fly, by Doreen Cronin; A Fine, Fine School by Sharon Creech; and Which Would You Rather Be? by William Steig. He is also an award-winning, internationally syndicated cartoonist and a cover artist for the New Yorker magazine. He lives in Vermont with his son.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Invisible Bandapet Needs Large Amounts of Pumpkin Must be Fresh

    Hank Wolowitz, please call him Wolowitz, lives with his sister and parents in an apartment above their Brooklyn ice cream shop called the "Big Round Pumpkin: Ice Cream for a Happy World." His best friend Wainscotting has moved to Iowa City leaving Wolowitz feeling alone. It doesn't help that Wolowitz is being bullied at school by Gillicut who is taking his sprinkles at lunch each day Even worse - upon complaining to his teacher, Ms. Cherry, Wolowitz is given lame advice and later is accused of being the bully.

    One day, while at the ice cream shop, Wolowitz drops sprinkles on the floor. When he reaches under the sink to get the fleeing sprinkles he feels something soft but sees nothing there. Later, he watches as a waffle cone walks itself to the edge of the counter and disappears. In the hallway of his apartment, with a neighbor's dog on a leash, the dog goes crazy wild at an empty corner. Wolowitz swipes his hand through the area to show the canine that nothing is there and feels the furry object again, this time it is shaking in his would-be shoes. Wolowitz has found a lone bandapet.

    Bandapets, an endangered species, need lots of Vitamin A, so they feed mainly on squash, which is getting scare in their own land. So this bandapet, named Inkling, has come to Brooklyn looking for squash, hoping he has hit the jackpot at the Big Round Pumpkin. Now that Wolowitz has saved Inkling from the dog Inkling is bound by the bandapet code of honor which requires the bandapet stay with the one who saved his life until he is the savior. Inkling and Hank, oops, Wolowitz spend afternoons playing games and eating, simply enjoying their friendship. Soon, Inkling realizes squash is not as plentiful as he thought in Brooklyn and must head north and Wolowitz must face his tormentor and get his sprinkles back. Together they work out a plan that may solve their problems.

    Invisible Inkling is a fast read and a fun read. Hank Wolowitz is a lovable character and a typical 10 year old boy. Inkling comes along at the best time for Hank, right after his best friend moves away, leaving him without a close companion. With Inkling, Hank has both a new friend and a truly invisible friend. What kid wouldn't love that! Hank's father is still stuck in the 1960's, talking like a hippie and extremely mellow with a sense of idealized peace. Not much help for a boy being bullied. Inkling is a chronic fibber, changing his background story enough to confuse even himself. Still this only endears Inkling more to Hank and the reader. This book won't help anyone deal with bullies or learn where bandapets originally came from, but it is a funny read most kids will enjoy.


    note: received from Netgalley, courtesy of the publisher

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2012

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