The Invisible Man

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Overview

A gripping and entertaining tale of terror and suspense as well as a potent Faustian allegory of hubris and science run amok, The Invisible Man endures as one of the signature stories in the literature of science fiction. A brilliant scientist uncovers the secret to invisibility, but his grandiose dreams and the power he unleashes cause him to spiral into intrigue, madness, and murder. The inspiration for countless imitations and film adaptations, The Invisible Man is as ...
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The Invisible Man

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Overview

A gripping and entertaining tale of terror and suspense as well as a potent Faustian allegory of hubris and science run amok, The Invisible Man endures as one of the signature stories in the literature of science fiction. A brilliant scientist uncovers the secret to invisibility, but his grandiose dreams and the power he unleashes cause him to spiral into intrigue, madness, and murder. The inspiration for countless imitations and film adaptations, The Invisible Man is as remarkable and relevant today as it was a hundred years ago.

A quiet English country village is disturbed by the arrival of a mysterious stranger who keeps his face hidden and his back to everyone.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“I personally consider the greatest of English living writers [to be] H. G. Wells.” —Upton Sinclair
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781491537183
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • Publication date: 7/29/2014
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Sales rank: 1,045,347
  • Product dimensions: 6.50 (w) x 5.50 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

H. G. Wells

Herbert George Wells was born in Bromley, Kent, England, on September 21, 1866. His father was a professional cricketer and sometime shopkeeper, his mother a former lady’s maid. Although "Bertie" left school at fourteen to become a draper’s apprentice (a life he detested), he later won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science in London, where he studied with the famous Thomas Henry Huxley. He began to sell articles and short stories regularly in 1893. In 1895, his immediately successful novel rescued him from a life of penury on a schoolteacher’s salary. His other "scientific romances"—The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), The War of the Worlds (1898), The First Men in the Moon (1901), and The War in the Air (1908)—won him distinction as the father of science fiction.

Henry James saw in Wells the most gifted writer of the age, but Wells, having coined the phrase "the war that will end war" to describe World War I, became increasingly disillusioned and focused his attention on educating mankind with his bestselling Outline of History (1920) and his later utopian works. Living until 1946, Wells witnessed a world more terrible than any of his imaginative visions, and he bitterly observed: "Reality has taken a leaf from my book and set itself to supercede me."

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    1. Also Known As:
      Herbert George Wells (full name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      September 21, 1866
    2. Place of Birth:
      Bromley, Kent, England
    1. Date of Death:
      August 13, 1946
    2. Place of Death:
      London, England

Read an Excerpt

The Invisible Man


By H. G. Wells

OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA

Copyright © 2014 MysteriousPress.com/Open Road Integrated Media, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4976-9104-9


CHAPTER 1

THE STRANGE MAN'S ARRIVAL


THE STRANGER CAME EARLY in February, one wintry day, through a biting wind and a driving snow, the last snowfall of the year, over the down, walking from Bramblehurst railway station, and carrying a little black portmanteau in his thickly gloved hand. He was wrapped up from head to foot, and the brim of his soft felt hat hid every inch of his face but the shiny tip of his nose; the snow had piled itself against his shoulders and chest, and added a white crest to the burden he carried. He staggered into the "Coach and Horses" more dead than alive, and flung his portmanteau down. "A fire," he cried, "in the name of human charity! A room and a fire!" He stamped and shook the snow from off himself in the bar, and followed Mrs. Hall into her guest parlour to strike his bargain. And with that much introduction, that and a couple of sovereigns flung upon the table, he took up his quarters in the inn.

Mrs. Hall lit the fire and left him there while she went to prepare him a meal with her own hands. A guest to stop at Iping in the wintertime was an unheard-of piece of luck, let alone a guest who was no "haggler," and she was resolved to show herself worthy of her good fortune. As soon as the bacon was well under way, and Millie, her lymphatic maid, had been brisked up a bit by a few deftly chosen expressions of contempt, she carried the cloth, plates, and glasses into the parlour and began to lay them with the utmost éclat. Although the fire was burning up briskly, she was surprised to see that her visitor still wore his hat and coat, standing with his back to her and staring out of the window at the falling snow in the yard. His gloved hands were clasped behind him, and he seemed to be lost in thought. She noticed that the melting snow that still sprinkled his shoulders dripped upon her carpet.

"Can I take your hat and coat, sir?" she said, "and give them a good dry in the kitchen?"

"No," he said without turning.

She was not sure she had heard him, and was about to repeat her question.

He turned his head and looked at her over his shoulder. "I prefer to keep them on," he said with emphasis, and she noticed that he wore big blue spectacles with sidelights, and had a bush side-whisker over his coat-collar that completely hid his cheeks and face.

"Very well, sir," she said. "As you like. In a bit the room will be warmer."

He made no answer, and had turned his face away from her again, and Mrs. Hall, feeling that her conversational advances were ill-timed, laid the rest of the table things in a quick staccato and whisked out of the room. When she returned he was still standing there, like a man of stone, his back hunched, his collar turned up, his dripping hat-brim turned down, hiding his face and ears completely. She put down the eggs and bacon with considerable emphasis, and called rather than said to him, "Your lunch is served, sir."

"Thank you," he said at the same time, and did not stir until she was closing the door. Then he swung round and approached the table with a certain eager quickness.

As she went behind the bar to the kitchen she heard a sound repeated at regular intervals. Chirk, chirk, chirk, it went, the sound of a spoon being rapidly whisked round a basin. "That girl!" she said. "There! I clean forgot it. It's her being so long!" And while she herself finished mixing the mustard, she gave Millie a few verbal stabs for her excessive slowness. She had cooked the ham and eggs, laid the table, and done everything, while Millie (help indeed!) had only succeeded in delaying the mustard. And him a new guest and wanting to stay! Then she filled the mustard pot, and, putting it with a certain stateliness upon a gold and black tea-tray, carried it into the parlour.

She rapped and entered promptly. As she did so her visitor moved quickly, so that she got but a glimpse of a white object disappearing behind the table. It would seem he was picking something from the floor. She rapped down the mustard pot on the table, and then she noticed the overcoat and hat had been taken off and put over a chair in front of the fire, and a pair of wet boots threatened rust to her steel fender. She went to these things resolutely. "I suppose I may have them to dry now," she said in a voice that brooked no denial.

"Leave the hat," said her visitor, in a muffled voice, and turning she saw he had raised his head and was sitting and looking at her.

For a moment she stood gaping at him, too surprised to speak.

He held a white cloth—it was a serviette he had brought with him—over the lower part of his face, so that his mouth and jaws were completely hidden, and that was the reason of his muffled voice. But it was not that which startled Mrs. Hall. It was the fact that all his forehead above his blue glasses was covered by a white bandage, and that another covered his ears, leaving not a scrap of his face exposed excepting only his pink, peaked nose. It was bright, pink, and shiny just as it had been at first. He wore a dark-brown velvet jacket with a high, black, linen-lined collar turned up about his neck. The thick black hair, escaping as it could below and between the cross bandages, projected in curious tails and horns, giving him the strangest appearance conceivable. This muffled and bandaged head was so unlike what she had anticipated, that for a moment she was rigid.

He did not remove the serviette, but remained holding it, as she saw now, with a brown gloved hand, and regarding her with his inscrutable blue glasses. "Leave the hat," he said, speaking very distinctly through the white cloth.

Her nerves began to recover from the shock they had received. She placed the hat on the chair again by the fire. "I didn't know, sir," she began, "that—" and she stopped embarrassed.

"Thank you," he said drily, glancing from her to the door and then at her again.

"I'll have them nicely dried, sir, at once," she said, and carried his clothes out of the room. She glanced at his white-swathed head and blue goggles again as she was going out of the door; but his napkin was still in front of his face. She shivered a little as she closed the door behind her, and her face was eloquent of her surprise and perplexity. "Inever," she whispered. "There!" She went quite softly to the kitchen, and was too preoccupied to ask Millie what she was messing about with now, when she got there.

The visitor sat and listened to her retreating feet. He glanced inquiringly at the window before he removed his serviette, and resumed his meal. He took a mouthful, glanced suspiciously at the window, took another mouthful, then rose and, taking the serviette in his hand, walked across the room and pulled the blind down to the top of the white muslin that obscured the lower panes. This left the room in a twilight. This done, he returned with an easier air to the table and his meal.

"The poor soul's had an accident or an op'ration or somethin'," said Mrs. Hall. "What a turn them bandages did give me, to be sure!"

She put on some more coal, unfolded the clothes-horse, and extended the traveller's coat upon this. "And they goggles! Why, he looked more like a divin' helmet than a human man!" She hung his muffler on a corner of the horse. "And holding that handkerchief over his mouth all the time. Talkin' through it! ... Perhaps his mouth was hurt too—maybe."

She turned round, as one who suddenly remembers. "Bless my soul alive!" she said, going off at a tangent; "ain't you done them taters yet, Millie?"

When Mrs. Hall went to clear away the stranger's lunch, her idea that his mouth must also have been cut or disfigured in the accident she supposed him to have suffered, was confirmed, for he was smoking a pipe, and all the time that she was in the room he never loosened the silk muffler he had wrapped round the lower part of his face to put the mouthpiece to his lips. Yet it was not forgetfulness, for she saw he glanced at it as it smouldered out. He sat in the corner with his back to the window-blind and spoke now, having eaten and drunk and being comfortably warmed through, with less aggressive brevity than before. The reflection of the fire lent a kind of red animation to his big spectacles they had lacked hitherto.

"I have some luggage," he said, "at Bramblehurst station," and he asked her how he could have it sent. He bowed his bandaged head quite politely in acknowledgment of her explanation. "To-morrow?" he said. "There is no speedier delivery?" and seemed quite disappointed when she answered, "No." Was she quite sure? No man with a trap who would go over?

Mrs. Hall, nothing loath, answered his questions and developed a conversation. "It's a steep road by the down, sir," she said in answer to the question about a trap; and then, snatching at an opening, said, "It was there a carriage was upsettled, a year ago and more. A gentleman killed, besides his coachman. Accidents, sir, happen in a moment, don't they?"

But the visitor was not to be drawn so easily. "They do," he said through his muffler, eyeing her quietly through his impenetrable glasses.

"But they take long enough to get well, don't they? ... There was my sister's son, Tom, jest cut his arm with a scythe, tumbled on it in the 'ayfield, and, bless me! he was three months tied up sir. You'd hardly believe it. It's regular given me a dread of a scythe, sir."

"I can quite understand that," said the visitor.

"He was afraid, one time, that he'd have to have an op'ration—he was that bad, sir."

The visitor laughed abruptly, a bark of a laugh that he seemed to bite and kill in his mouth. "Was he?" he said.

"He was, sir. And no laughing matter to them as had the doing for him, as I had—my sister being took up with her little ones so much. There was bandages to do, sir, and bandages to undo. So that if I may make so bold as to say it, sir—"

"Will you get me some matches?" said the visitor, quite abruptly. "My pipe is out."

Mrs. Hall was pulled up suddenly. It was certainly rude of him, after telling him all she had done. She gasped at him for a moment, and remembered the two sovereigns. She went for the matches.

"Thanks," he said concisely, as she put them down, and turned his shoulder upon her and stared out of the window again. It was altogether too discouraging. Evidently he was sensitive on the topic of operations and bandages. She did not "make so bold as to say," however, after all. But his snubbing way had irritated her, and Millie had a hot time of it that afternoon.

The visitor remained in the parlour until four o'clock, without giving the ghost of an excuse for an intrusion. For the most part he was quite still during that time; it would seem he sat in the growing darkness smoking in the firelight—perhaps dozing.

Once or twice a curious listener might have heard him at the coals, and for the space of five minutes he was audible pacing the room. He seemed to be talking to himself. Then the armchair creaked as he sat down again.

CHAPTER 2

MR. TEDDY HENFREY'S FIRST IMPRESSIONS


AT FOUR O'CLOCK, when it was fairly dark and Mrs. Hall was screwing up her courage to go in and ask her visitor if he would take some tea, Teddy Henfrey, the clock-jobber, came into the bar. "My sakes! Mrs. Hall," said he, "but this is terrible weather for thin boots!" The snow outside was falling faster.

Mrs. Hall agreed, and then noticed he had his bag with him. "Now you're here, Mr. Teddy," said she, "I'd be glad if you'd give th' old clock in the parlour a bit of a look. 'Tis going, and it strikes well and hearty; but the hour-hand won't do nuthin' but point at six."

And leading the way, she went across to the parlour door and rapped and entered.

Her visitor, she saw as she opened the door, was seated in the armchair before the fire, dozing it would seem, with his bandaged head drooping on one side. The only light in the room was the red glow from the fire—which lit his eyes like adverse railway signals, but left his downcast face in darkness—and the scanty vestiges of the day that came in through the open door. Everything was ruddy, shadowy, and indistinct to her, the more so since she had just been lighting the bar lamp, and her eyes were dazzled. But for a second it seemed to her that the man she looked at had an enormous mouth wide open—a vast and incredible mouth that swallowed the whole of the lower portion of his face. It was the sensation of a moment: the white-bound head, the monstrous goggle eyes, and this huge yawn below it. Then he stirred, started up in his chair, put up his hand. She opened the door wide, so that the room was lighter, and she saw him more clearly, with the muffler held up to his face just as she had seen him hold the serviette before. The shadows, she fancied, had tricked her.

"Would you mind, sir, this man a-coming to look at the clock, sir?" she said, recovering from the momentary shock.

"Look at the clock?" he said, staring round in a drowsy manner, and speaking over his hand, and then, getting more fully awake, "certainly."

Mrs. Hall went away to get a lamp, and he rose and stretched himself. Then came the light, and Mr. Teddy Henfrey, entering, was confronted by this bandaged person. He was, he says, "taken aback."

"Good afternoon," said the stranger, regarding him—as Mr. Henfrey says, with a vivid sense of the dark spectacles— "like a lobster."

"I hope," said Mr. Henfrey, "that it's no intrusion."

"None whatever," said the stranger. "Though, I understand," he said turning to Mrs. Hall, "that this room is really to be mine for my own private use."

"I thought, sir," said Mrs. Hall, "you'd prefer the clock—"

"Certainly," said the stranger, "certainly—but, as a rule, I like to be alone and undisturbed.

"But I'm really glad to have the clock seen to," he said, seeing a certain hesitation in Mr. Henfrey's manner. "Very glad." Mr. Henfrey had intended to apologise and withdraw, but this anticipation reassured him. The stranger turned round with his back to the fireplace and put his hands behind his back. "And presently," he said, "when the clock-mending is over, I think I should like to have some tea. But not till the clock-mending is over."

Mrs. Hall was about to leave the room—she made no conversational advances this time, because she did not want to be snubbed in front of Mr. Henfrey—when her visitor asked her if she had made any arrangements about his boxes at Bramblehurst. She told him she had mentioned the matter to the postman, and that the carrier could bring them over on the morrow. "You are certain that is the earliest?" he said.

She was certain, with a marked coldness.

"I should explain," he added, "what I was really too cold and fatigued to do before, that I am an experimental investigator."

"Indeed, sir," said Mrs. Hall, much impressed.

"And my baggage contains apparatus and appliances."

"Very useful things indeed they are, sir," said Mrs. Hall.

"And I'm very naturally anxious to get on with my inquiries."

"Of course, sir."

"My reason for coming to Iping," he proceeded, with a certain deliberation of manner, "was ... a desire for solitude. I do not wish to be disturbed in my work. In addition to my work, an accident—"

"I thought as much," said Mrs. Hall to herself.

"— necessitates a certain retirement. My eyes—are sometimes so weak and painful that I have to shut myself up in the dark for hours together. Lock myself up. Sometimes—now and then. Not at present, certainly. At such times the slightest disturbance, the entry of a stranger into the room, is a source of excruciating annoyance to me—it is well these things should be understood."

"Certainly, sir," said Mrs. Hall. "And if I might make so bold as to ask—"

"That I think, is all," said the stranger, with that quietly irresistible air of finality he could assume at will. Mrs. Hall reserved her question and sympathy for a better occasion.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Invisible Man by H. G. Wells. Copyright © 2014 MysteriousPress.com/Open Road Integrated Media, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction 1
The Invisible Man: A Grotesque Romance (1897) 29
(Annotated text of the first New York edition) 32
App. I Review of The Invisible Man in The Spectator (1897) 205
App. II Review of The Invisible Man by Arnold Bennett (1897) 207
App. III Sergei Nechaev, "The Revolutionary Catechism" (1869), Section 1 209
App. IV T. H. Huxley, "Science and Culture" (1880), Excerpt 212
App. V Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, "The Sphinx" (1843) 218
Bibliography 227
Index 237
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Reading Group Guide

A gripping and entertaining tale of terror and suspense as well as a potent Faustian allegory of hubris and science run amok, The Invisible Man endures as one of the signature stories in the literature of science fiction. A brilliant scientist uncovers the secret to invisibility, but his grandiose dreams and the power he unleashes cause him to spiral into intrigue, madness, and murder. The inspiration for countless imitations and film adaptations, The Invisible Man is as remarkable and relevant today as it was a hundred years ago. As Arthur C. Clarke points out in his Introduction, “The interest of the story . . . lies not in its scientific concepts, but in the brilliantly worked out development of the theme of invisibility. If one could be invisible, then what?”
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 221 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(96)

4 Star

(62)

3 Star

(32)

2 Star

(14)

1 Star

(17)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 222 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 2, 2009

    This book is the best book I have read!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    This is a man who wants to learn how to turn things invisible.He turns himself invisible,he has been living thi way forever.He is robbing to live his life.Some one is betraying him and telling what he does. What will happen to the invisible man!I recomend this book because it's mysterious and it's addicting!!!!!!!

    9 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2012

    Dude

    I read the book in 3rd grade. But another really good book by H.G.Wells is The War of the Worlds. Try that one out. Its great.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2012

    This book ISN'T invisible!

    Great book, awesome movie...
    Here we go gathering nuts in May...

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 8, 2011

    Amazing!!

    This book is very well written and kept me intrested the whole way through. I had read alot of reviews saying how boring it is but it is my personal opinion that this book is very much the opposite of boring. Definetly a great read. :)

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 14, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I have to start out by saying I was sorely mistaken as to what I

    I have to start out by saying I was sorely mistaken as to what I thought this book (“The Invisible Man” by H. G. Wells) was about! Honestly, I thought it was more something like the adventures of an invisible man, light and humorous. Was I ever wrong!

    Maybe I should have gotten the hint that it wasn’t some happy-go-lucky story from the following:

    “He’s deadly. He’s insane. He’s standing beside you. And you won’t know – until he strikes. . .” – from the cover of my edition

    and . . .

    “. . . invisibility is good for one thing. . . creating terror. An invisible man can kill people. . .” – from the back cover of my edition

    Unfortunately in this case, I normally stay away from reading a synopsis for fear that the summary will give something away.

    “The Invisible Man” by H. G. Wells is a classic book published in 1899, so while it fulfills the requirement of a classic book from the 19th century for my Classics Challenge, besides that, I wasn’t impressed.

    “The Invisible Man” is a story about a man, Griffin, who is invisible and angry with the world. He realizes that if he wears clothing or eats, his clothing and food are seen. If he moves, he’s heard. So basically, an invisible man is good for causing terror and abuse. Thus, Griffin proceeds to cause terror and harm to the people in the story.

    I greatly disliked the invisible man, Griffin. He’s an evil character, but not even a villain you enjoy, like the Joker in Batman. He’s just ruthless, unfeeling, angry, selfish, and really rude to people.

    I recommend this book to people who want to read the classics, but I didn’t enjoy it myself. It’s a quick read, I just wasn’t a fan.

    I’d prefer to recommend “The Island of Dr. Moreau” by H. G. Wells if you are looking for a short classic by the same author. And although I disliked this book, I still have on my list, and will read another one of his books, “The Time Machine.”

    What are your thoughts on “The Invisible Man” and H. G. Wells as an author? Go to my LoveAtFirstBook blog and tell me what you think!

    Thanks for reading,

    Rebecca

    2 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 2, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Classic In H. G. Wells' classic novel, a scientist turns himself

    Classic
    In H. G. Wells' classic novel, a scientist turns himself invisible and wreaks havoc in rural England. This book is a versatile classic because it could be read by someone who is young or who simply wants to read fluff, but it can also be appreciated by more careful readers who are looking for undercurrents of meaning. It's a tragi-farcical romp in 19th century England, but it's also a warning about what people might do simply because they can get away with it. This is a classic that anyone interested in science fiction should read.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2003

    Interesting short story

    The concept of invisibility has been the source of much theory and conjecture. If there was a way to bend light or to have a garment (or skin, as in the case of the Invisible Man), be able to reflect all colors of the visible spectrum, it could be used for good or evil. The story deals with the ramification of unique power and the use of that power. In the case of the Invisible Man, the main character is both brilliant and tragic. You find yourself asking what kind of path you would follow had you been in the Invisible Man's place. This was the first of many classic stories by H.G. Wells, and it is worth the read. I did find it a bit shorter than I would have liked, but Wells was never one to waste words. I still liked it, but not as much as his other works.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2012

    A small clearing

    Fulled with small nuts and seeds. A stream also runs on the side filled with fish. The seeds and nuts draw about lots of prey.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2011

    is a great read

    This book seemed to have that classic touch to it. It was one of those brilliant tales of a gifted scientist going mad over his experiments. My favorites.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2009

    best book ever

    good for teens and fun to read some bigh words but a good book buy it!!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2015

    Alexei

    She yelped as someone fired a tranquilizer dart at her, dropping into unconsciousness.<p>{Yeah...Again, danke.}

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2015

    O.o

    Not funny.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2015

    Rohan

    ((Fu<_>ck you. I hate trolls. -_-))

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2015

    Rohan

    Picks her up, running back to the main bunker.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2015

    Great but hard

    The plot of the book was great but it was also very cunfusing at times when the narrator wiuld almost break off to talk about something. It was hard to follow and at times made me even tired. Though the plot was amazing and really portrayed the human mind in how things we think are great really arnt. It also shows how the mind can be so different when given the burden of being invisible when really it should be seen as a gift. Glad i read the book but a very hard read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2015

    Girl

    Doupt entered her mind with a click. The shot was wearing off. She blinked slowly before snapping to realization. She pushed the lady away and struggled toward the door. "Help!!"

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2015

    Mistress

    She kept cu**ing, kissing her even deeper. Her hands played with Girl's nip<_>ples as she kissed.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2015

    Master

    He was up in a flash, darting toward her and pinning her to the floor. He dragged her back and gave her an overdose, this one lasting all day. He strapped a choking collar onto her neck and shoved his di** deep into her. "Submit, child."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2015

    CLICK FOR NOOK FRIENDS!JOIN STAR CHAT

    G0 2:; ME TAWK FUNNY BY NEIL MCFARLANE 2 JOIN STAR CHAT A CHAT PLACE FOR EVERY ONE HOPE 2 C U THER

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  • Posted February 22, 2015

    Great book.  No idea why it's being sold for 10 dollars though.

    Great book.  No idea why it's being sold for 10 dollars though.  It's literally free on other sites as the copyright has expired.  Do not pay money for it on your Nook.

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