Invisible Women: Junior Enlisted Army Wives

Invisible Women: Junior Enlisted Army Wives

by Margaret C. Harrell
     
 

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The voices of three women convey the dilemmas faced by many young families in the armed services.See more details below

Overview

The voices of three women convey the dilemmas faced by many young families in the armed services.

Editorial Reviews

militarylifestyle.com
An insightful look into the lives of enlisted Army wives...A compilation of extensive research and an excellent sociological study.
Air Force Times
Three women with one thing in common....Their stories paint a picture of the concerns of many junior enlisted families.
National Military Family Association
The stories provide insight into the experiences and attitudes of other junior enlisted families.
National Journal
Invisible Women confronts an issue crucial to military morale and readiness....this slim paperback illuminates not only policy, but humanity as well.
Midwest Book Review
...highly recommended reading for anyone considering family life within the context of military service, women's studies groups, and military life reference collections.
Washington Times
Invisible Women is an objective, balanced and thoughtful book portraying the real lives of young enlisted families.
Feminist Academic Press Column
There are many women who support the military community whose lives and work go virtually unnoticed--wives of military personnel. Invisible Women addresses this issue.
In Invisible Women: Junior Enlisted Army Wives, Margaret Harrell reveals a surprising and candid revelation about the lives of junior enlisted Army wives based on interviews with hundreds of spouses, Army Personnel, and others in the military community. Three specific and representative women give voice to the dilemmas commonly confronting junior enlisted families. The informative text blends humor and pathos as these young women speak of the challenges of youth, lack of education, financial difficulties, distance from husbands and families, and being "invisible" within a large military bureaucracy. Invisible Women is highly recommended reading for anyone considering family life within the context of military service, women's studies groups, and military life reference collections.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780833028808
Publisher:
Rand Publishing
Publication date:
01/28/2001
Pages:
142
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.17(h) x 0.32(d)
Lexile:
1040L (what's this?)

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Invisible Women

Junior Enlisted Army Wives
By Margaret C. Harrell

Rand Corporation

Copyright © 2001 Margaret C. Harrell
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780833028808


Preface

In the best of circumstances, military manpower policy is crafted by policymakers with input from military personnel managers, analysts, and military leadership with an in-depth understanding of the life experiences and views of junior enlisted personnel. It is plausible to expect that some policymakers attribute the attitudes and experiences of these young soldiers to particular features, such as youth or lack of advanced education, and thus believe themselves able to empathize with this population group by recalling their own parallel life experiences. However, this approach oversimplifies the life experiences of these families and neglects the reality that most policymakers and professional managers have never experienced the compendium of problems these couples face, such as youth, lack of education, financial difficulties, emotional and physical distance from extended family, and invisibility in a large bureaucracy.

At the center of this book are the personal stories of three junior enlisted spouses, told in their own voices and selected to emphasize the dilemmas numerous enlisted families face. The stories provide insight into the experiences and attitudes of some junior enlisted families. Those who live a military lifestyle-at any pay grade-will find these stories both useful and engaging. Some junior enlisted personnel and their spouses will recognize themselves in these stories, and others in the military community will gain a better understanding of problems they may have seen. Additionally, these insights help provide some human context for official statistics and should be of interest to the military leadership; personnel managers; analysts; and policymakers involved in the recruiting, retention, and management of junior enlisted personnel and their families, as well as to Congress and the media.

These stories were excerpted from a long series of interviews conducted during research for a dissertation that addressed the roles and experiences of Army spouses. This research included 105 recorded and transcribed interviews with military spouses, as well as less formal interviews and discussions with military personnel, spouses, and other individuals in the military community. The author also spoke with numerous other spouses and soldiers during Enlisted Spouses Club meetings, Officers' Spouses Club meetings, visits to Army Community Services facilities, and various other gatherings. This research also included an extensive review of the archives of local military and civilian newspapers.

The dissertation research was supported in part by the University of Virginia's Center for Children, Families, and the Law; the National Science Foundation; RAND; and the Forces and Resources Policy Center of RAND's National Defense Research Institute, a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Staff, the Unified Commands, and the defense agencies. While the research was not part of a RAND project and was not funded through the Department of Defense, the Army officially acknowledged it and enabled it to occur. At each of the research locations, the author was formally acknowledged by the local military leadership and was approved for interviews and discussions with military personnel, civilian Department of Defense employees, and military dependents. While the research was not part of a RAND project and was not funded through the Department of Defense, the Army facilitated the interviews and discussions with military personnel, civilian Department of Defense employees, and military dependents.

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Excerpted from Invisible Women by Margaret C. Harrell Copyright © 2001 by Margaret C. Harrell. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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