iPhone Game Development: Developing 2D & 3D games in Objective-C (Animal Guide Series)

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Overview

What do you need to know to create a game for the iPhone? Even if you've already built some iPhone applications, developing games using iPhone's gestural interface and limited screen layout requires new skills. With iPhone Game Development, you get everything from game development basics and iPhone programming fundamentals to guidelines for dealing with special graphics and audio needs, creating in-game physics, and much more.

Loaded with descriptive examples and clear ...

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iPhone Game Development

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Overview

What do you need to know to create a game for the iPhone? Even if you've already built some iPhone applications, developing games using iPhone's gestural interface and limited screen layout requires new skills. With iPhone Game Development, you get everything from game development basics and iPhone programming fundamentals to guidelines for dealing with special graphics and audio needs, creating in-game physics, and much more.

Loaded with descriptive examples and clear explanations, this book helps you learn the technical design issues particular to the iPhone and iPod Touch, and suggests ways to maximize performance in different types of games. You also get plug-in classes to compensate for the areas where the iPhone's game programming support is weak.

  • Learn how to develop iPhone games that provide engaging user experiences
  • Become familiar with Objective-C and the Xcode suite of tools
  • Learn what it takes to adapt the iPhone interface to games
  • Create a robust, scalable framework for a game app
  • Understand the requirements for implementing 2D and 3D graphics
  • Learn how to add music and audio effects, as well as menus and controls
  • Get instructions for publishing your game to the App Store


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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596159856
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/15/2009
  • Series: Animal Guide Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 242
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul Zirkle has five years of mobile game programming experience and is currently a Lead Mobile Programmer at Konami Digital Entertainment. He has worked on over 40 titles, including porting, re-writing and full development. Occasionally, Paul is called upon to give lectures on game development at the University of Southern California.

Joe Hogue has five years of mobile game programming experience. He worked with Paul at Konami and currently works for Electronic Arts as a Mobile Programmer. Joe has worked on over 40 titles as well, including porting, re-writes and full development. Joe has written an iPhone game that is currently being submitted to the iTunes AppStore.

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Table of Contents

Preface;
The Authors;
Our Goal;
Prerequisites;
Audience;
Organization of This Book;
Conventions Used in This Book;
Using Code Examples;
We’d Like to Hear from You;
Safari® Books Online;
Acknowledgments;
Chapter 1: Introduction to the iPhone;
1.1 Apple Developer Account and Downloading the SDK;
1.2 Loading Devices;
1.3 Objective-C Primer;
1.4 Conclusion;
Chapter 2: Game Engine Anatomy;
2.1 Application Framework;
2.2 Game State Manager;
2.3 Graphics Engine;
2.4 Conclusion;
Chapter 3: The Framework;
3.1 Game State Management;
3.2 The App Delegate;
3.3 Event Handling;
3.4 The Resource Manager;
3.5 The Render Engine;
3.6 The Sound Engine;
3.7 The Data Store;
3.8 The Skeleton Application;
3.9 Conclusion;
Chapter 4: 2D Game Engine;
4.1 Game Design;
4.2 Tile Engine;
4.3 Animation;
4.4 Physics;
4.5 Level 1 Implementation;
4.6 Level 2 Implementation;
4.7 Level 3 Implementation;
4.8 Level 4 Implementation;
4.9 Game State Serialization;
4.10 Conclusion;
Chapter 5: 3D Games;
5.1 GLESGameState3D Class;
5.2 3D Game Design;
5.3 Implementation;
5.4 Conclusion;
Chapter 6: Considerations for Game Design;
6.1 Resource Management;
6.2 User Input Design;
6.3 Networking;
6.4 Third-Party Code;
6.5 App Store;
6.6 Conclusion;
References;
Code Reference;
Physics Libraries;
Middleware;
Open Source Games;
Colophon;

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    King

    Fyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy

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  • Posted January 4, 2010

    Too many scripting errors, You may get stuck.

    Chapter 3 has several errors in the scripting examples, which make it difficult to complete the examples. The iPhone "Game" programing development theory, from chapters 1-2 is pretty good. And, the over-all game programming examples (seem) valuable. The text gets into some cool sprite management examples, where you can develop your own home brewed collision detection, and AI logic. According to the post on the "Errata" the examples from pg 70 start to come together on page 79. [I have got that far yet]. Also The book doesn't claim to be for beginners. Nevertheless, I don't think scripting errors in a text about scripting, should go unrewarded. So if you decide to purchase the book, make sure to go to the Errata page on www.oreilly.com, if you get stuck.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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