iPhoto 5: The Missing Manual

Overview

Our Missing Manual is hands-down the bestselling book on iPhoto. And now, updated to cover Apple's newest release, iPhoto 5: The Missing Manual comes fully loaded—and in full color—so you can exercise all the power, flexibility, and creativity of the stunning new iPhoto 5.Some of iPhoto 5's fifty new features are tiny nips and tucks, such as menu rewordings, quiet refinements, and secret keystrokes that take most people days to stumble through. Others are big-ticket overhauls aimed at both power users (RAW-file ...

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Overview

Our Missing Manual is hands-down the bestselling book on iPhoto. And now, updated to cover Apple's newest release, iPhoto 5: The Missing Manual comes fully loaded—and in full color—so you can exercise all the power, flexibility, and creativity of the stunning new iPhoto 5.Some of iPhoto 5's fifty new features are tiny nips and tucks, such as menu rewordings, quiet refinements, and secret keystrokes that take most people days to stumble through. Others are big-ticket overhauls aimed at both power users (RAW-file import and editing, color correction sliders, real-time histogram) and everyday shutterbugs (nested file folders, individual-photo control in slideshows, and a completely rewritten book-layout kit). Additional improvements include a robust search feature (similar to that of iTunes) and the addition of "objects" for slideshow and book projects (using objects, you can manipulate images without affecting pictures in your master library).iPhoto 5: The Missing Manual covers them all with the scrupulous objectivity, clever wit, and technical wisdom you count on from David Pogue along with the Mac and digital photography expertise of Derrick Story.Their authoritative guide starts out with a crash course on digital photography, complete with tutorials on buying a digital camera, composing brilliant photos in various situations (including sports photography, portraits, nighttime photography—even kid photography!) and making digital movies. iPhoto 5: The Missing Manual then launches into every detail of iPhoto, from camera-meets-Mac basics to storing, searching, and editing; from sharing your digital photography with the world (via customized slideshows—complete with iTunes soundtrack, if you like—prints, photo books, email, the Web, and even your network) to exporting to QuickTime and iDVD. And don't forget iPhoto "stunts," such as building custom screen savers and desktop backdrops; exporting pictures; making the most of plug-ins, add-ons, and beef-ups; using AppleScript; and managing files with backups, CDs, and photo libraries.iPhoto 5: The Missing Manual gives you everything you need to become the digital photographer extraordinaire you want to be.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596100346
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/28/2005
  • Series: Missing Manual Series
  • Edition description: Fourth Edition
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 7.14 (w) x 9.18 (h) x 0.86 (d)

Meet the Author

David Pogue, Yale '85, is the weekly personal-technology columnist for the New York Times and an Emmy award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News. His funny tech videos appear weekly on CNBC. And with 3 million books in print, he is also one of the world's bestselling how- to authors. He wrote or co-wrote seven books in the "For Dummies" series (including Macs, Magic, Opera, and Classical Music). In 1999, he launched his own series of amusing, practical, and user-friendly computer books called Missing Manuals, which now includes 100 titles.

Derrick Story has more than 25 years as a photojournalist, including serving as managing editor for O'Reilly Network. He speaks at technology conferences including Macworld, PMA, PhotoPlus, and Santa Fe Workshops. He is the author of Digital Photography Hacks, Digital Photography Pocket Guide, 3rd Ed., The Digital Photography Companion, and his latest, The Photoshop CS4 Companion for Photographers. He coauthored iPhoto: The Missing Manual with David Pogue.

Derrick likes to keep his shooting skills sharp by running his photography business, Story Photography. You can listen to his photo podcasts and read his tips at The Digital Story (thedigitalstory.com) and follow him on Twitter. Aperture fans might want to check out his co-authored video training on Lynda.com: Aperture 2 Essential Training.

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Table of Contents

Copyright;
The Missing Credits;
About the Authors;
About the Creative Team;
Acknowledgements;
The Missing Manual Series;
Introduction;
;
About This Book;
The Very Basics;
Digital Cameras: The Missing Manual;
Chapter 1: Welcome to Digital Photography;
1.1 Meet Digital Photography;
1.2 Buying a Digital Camera;
Chapter 2: Composing Brilliant Photos;
2.1 Composition;
Chapter 3: Beyond the Simple Snapshot;
3.1 Action Photography;
3.2 Portraits;
3.3 Existing-Light Portraits;
3.4 Self-Portraits;
3.5 Kid Photography;
3.6 Theater Performances;
3.7 Underwater Photography;
3.8 Travel Photography;
3.9 Outdoor Portraits;
3.10 Indoor Flash;
3.11 Twilight Portraits;
3.12 Landscape and Nature;
3.13 Sunsets;
3.14 Weddings;
3.15 Photographing Objects;
3.16 Nighttime Photography;
3.17 Time-Lapse Photography;
3.18 Digital Movies;
3.19 Cameraphone Photography;
iPhoto Basics;
Chapter 4: Camera Meets Mac;
4.1 iPhoto: The Application;
4.2 Getting Your Pictures into iPhoto;
4.3 The Post-Dump Slideshow;
4.4 Where iPhoto Keeps Your Files;
Chapter 5: The Digital Shoebox;
5.1 The Source List;
5.2 More on Film Rolls;
5.3 Working with Your Photos;
5.4 Albums;
5.5 Folders;
5.6 Smart Albums;
5.7 Three Useful Panels;
5.8 Information Panel: Titles, Dates, and Comments;
5.9 The Calendar;
5.10 Keywords;
5.11 Searching for Photos by Text;
5.12 The Photo Info Window;
5.13 Rate Your Photos;
5.14 Deleting Photos;
5.15 Customizing the Shoebox;
Chapter 6: Editing Your Shots;
6.1 Editing in iPhoto;
6.2 One-Click Fixups: The Enhance Button;
6.3 Cropping;
6.4 Painting Over Freckles, Scratches, and Hairs;
6.5 Red-Eye;
6.6 B & W, Sepia;
6.7 Rotate;
6.8 The Adjust Panel;
6.9 Introduction to the Histogram;
6.10 Exposure;
6.11 Adjusting the Levels;
6.12 Brightness and Contrast Sliders;
6.13 Color Balance;
6.14 Straightening;
6.15 Sharpening;
6.16 Beyond iPhoto;
6.17 Reverting to the Original;
6.18 Editing RAW Files;
Meet Your Public;
Chapter 7: The iPhoto Slideshow;
7.1 About Slideshows;
7.2 Option-Click Slideshows;
7.3 Instant Slideshows;
7.4 Saved Slideshows;
7.5 Control Over the Show;
7.6 Slideshow Tips;
7.7 Slideshows and iDVD;
Chapter 8: Making Prints;
8.1 Making Great Prints;
8.2 Printing from iPhoto;
8.3 Ordering Prints Online;
Chapter 9: Sharing Online—and on Your Network;
9.1 Emailing Photos;
9.2 Publishing Photos on the Web;
9.3 The .Mac Slideshow;
9.4 Photo Sharing on the Network;
9.5 Photo Sharing Across Accounts;
Chapter 10: Publishing a Photo Book;
10.1 Phase 1: Pick the Pix;
10.2 Phase 2: Publishing Options;
10.3 Phase 3: Initial Layout;
10.4 Phase 4: Design the Pages;
10.5 Phase 5: Edit the Titles and Captions;
10.6 Phase 6: Preview the Masterpiece;
10.7 Phase 7: Send the Book to the Bindery;
Chapter 11: iPhoto Goes to the Movies;
11.1 Two Kinds of Slideshows;
11.2 Exporting an Instant Slideshow;
11.3 Exporting a Saved Slideshow;
11.4 Fun with QuickTime;
11.5 Managing Movies Imported From Your Camera;
11.6 Editing Digital-Camera Movies;
11.7 Burning a QuickTime Movie CD;
11.8 Slideshow Movies on the Web;
Chapter 12: iDVD Slideshows;
12.1 The iDVD Slideshow;
12.2 Extra Credit: Self-Playing Slideshows;
iPhoto Stunts;
Chapter 13: Screen Savers, AppleScript, and Cameraphones;
13.1 Building a Custom Screen Saver;
13.2 One-Click Desktop Backdrop;
13.3 Exporting and Converting Pictures;
13.4 Plug-Ins and Add-Ons;
13.5 AppleScript Tricks;
13.6 Transferring Cameraphone Pictures via Bluetooth;
Chapter 14: iPhoto File Management;
14.1 About iPhoto Discs;
14.2 iPhoto Backups;
14.3 Managing Photo Libraries;
14.4 Merging Photo Libraries;
14.5 Beyond iPhoto;
Appendixes;
Troubleshooting;
Importing and Opening;
Exporting;
Printing;
Editing;
General Questions;
iPhoto 5, Menu by Menu;
iPhoto Menu;
File Menu;
Edit Menu;
Photos Menu;
Share Menu;
View Menu;
Window Menu;
Help Menu;
Where to Go From Here;
iPhoto and the Web;
Colophon;

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2005

    broader scope than Photoshop

    Catching the wave! As digital cameras and cameraphones have become common, so too has the need to handle an ever increasing inventory of photos. Which is why Apple offers iPhoto 5. The book shows how Apple has refined iPhoto into a coherent and easily used package. There are tips on taking these digital photos and for editing a photo with various enhancements. But of the book's 14 chapters, only one is on actual editing. These capabilities of iPhoto are adequate, but clearly inferior to Photoshop. iPhoto's emphasis is different. It focuses more on handling or managing large numbers of photos. Especially in making your own website of these. Plus doing the printing of photos. You have to admire Apple for what they've done here. Adobe's Photoshop dominates digital image editing. But rather than trying to fruitlessly match Photoshop, feature for feature, Apple broadened the scope of digital image usages to include the above tasks, and then went after a new customer base. Where Photoshop had no dominance.

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