iPod: The Missing Manual by J. D. Biersdorfer, David Pogue | | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
iPod: The Missing Manual: The Missing Manual

iPod: The Missing Manual: The Missing Manual

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by J. D. Biersdorfer, David Pogue
     
 

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The iPod is the world's bestselling music player. But if you think that it's just a music player, then you must think Clark Kent is just a newspaperman.

In this book, New York Times tech columnist J. D. Biersdorfer blows open the secret doors of this gleaming, chrome-and-white beauty. With humor and authority, she lays bare an astonishing

Overview

The iPod is the world's bestselling music player. But if you think that it's just a music player, then you must think Clark Kent is just a newspaperman.

In this book, New York Times tech columnist J. D. Biersdorfer blows open the secret doors of this gleaming, chrome-and-white beauty. With humor and authority, she lays bare an astonishing collection of useful tips, tricks, and shortcuts like these:


  • iPod as PalmPilot. The iPod can suck in your calendar, address book, to-do list, and notes from a Mac or PC, and then display them at the touch of a button. It also doubles as an alarm clock and stopwatch.

  • iPod as hard drive. You can use your iPod to carry gigantic files from place to place.

  • iPod as e-book. The iPod makes an excellent book reader, capable of scrolling through recipes, driving directions, and even Web pages.

  • iPod as GameBoy. The iPod's games are perfect time-killers for waiting rooms, bus rides, and the Department of Motor Vehicles.

iPod: The Missing Manual is much more than it seems, too. It not only covers all iPod models for both Mac and Windows, including the super-slim 2003 series, it's also the ultimate guide to iTunes, MusicMatch Jukebox Plus, and even the new iTunes Music Store.

No matter what kind of music moves you, iPod: The Missing Manual will help you get much more out of your iPod--and much more into it.

Editorial Reviews

bn.com
The Barnes & Noble Review
What could be more exciting than to open up that new iPod box? There’s your iPod, nestled safely in its own little plastic insert, with its own little cellophane wrapper announcing, “Don’t Steal Music.” There are your earbud headphones, your FireWire cable, power adapter, dock, carrying case, software CD, warranty card, maybe even a remote control. And there’s…that’s your iPod User’s Guide? That itsy-bitsy folder? That’s all?

It might be different if your iPod were as dumb as the typical MP3 player. But, shucks, it’s not. The darned thing can track your appointments. Even if you only intend to use it for music, it can do a whole lot more than you might expect -- if only someone would tell you how. Especially when you take into account the software it comes with.

The solution? iPod: The Missing Manual. Gadget lover and New York Times tech columnist J. D. Biersdorfer has written a book that’s a perfect match for the iPod: simple, useful, and fun. Here’s everything you need to know about the iPod, along with a bunch of stuff that’s just plain cool to know. (Those earbuds? Those aren’t just aluminum or cobalt drivers in there: that’s neodymium, a rare-earth material that’s five times more powerful. Tell ’em that at your next cocktail party.)

Biersdorfer walks you through each of your iPod’s menus, showing (for example) how to create On-the-Go Playlists (new to the 2003 iPods -- before that, you had to download all your playlists from your computer). You’ll learn how to control your backlight (it’s pretty, but a huge battery drain: If you’re spinning tunes in a dark club, leave it Always On, but make darned sure you’re running on AC current.)

Next, you’ll walk through establishing your FireWire connection and syncing -- including installing a FireWire card if you’re running iPod on a Windows PC. (Biersdorfer covers both Mac and Windows iPods, which are growing increasingly alike and will be even more alike when Apple introduces iTunes for Windows).

There’s a full chapter on digital music formats: both MP3 and the impressive (albeit restricted) AAC format. AAC compressed at 128 kbps stereo is tough to distinguish from uncompressed audio sources. Wish you could say that about MP3.

She next turns to software: both iTunes for Macintosh and MusicMatch Jukebox for Windows. On both platforms, you’ll walk through ripping CDs, importing music files, deleting songs, playing music, and managing your music library. Biersdorfer even covers the software’s nifty Internet radio features.

Older iPod books didn’t have the opportunity to cover Apple’s new iTunes Music Store. This one does, discussing everything from shopping to billing. (Biersdorfer’s even reprinted Scott Taylor’s hilarious iTunes Music Store parody, to the tune of Billy Joel’s "Piano Man.")

Biersdorfer covers using your iPod as a boom box or connecting it to your car stereo. Where to update its internal software. Who offers a replacement case that doesn’t cover the screen or keep you from using the front-panel buttons. And, of course, iPod’s calendar and address book mini-applications. (Enough to make the thing tax deductible? Hmmm…) Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks for Dummies, Second Edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780596554026
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
Publication date:
10/09/2008
Series:
Missing Manual Series
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
304
File size:
29 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

J.D. Biersdorfer is a best-selling, veteran Missing Manual author. J.D. wrote iPad: The Missing Manual (First and Second Editions), co-wrote iPod: The Missing Manual and iPhoto: The Missing Manual, and is the author of Best iPhone Apps (Second Edition), Netbooks: The Missing Manual, Google: The Missing Manual, and The iPod Shuffle Fan Book. She has authored a weekly technology column for the The New York Times since 1998.

David Pogue, Yale '85, is the weekly personal-technology columnist for the New York Times and an Emmy award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News. His funny tech videos appear weekly on CNBC. And with 3 million books in print, he is also one of the world's bestselling how- to authors. In 1999, he launched his own series of amusing, practical, and user-friendly computer books called Missing Manuals, which now includes 100 titles.

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