I.Q. Goes to the Library

I.Q. Goes to the Library

by Mary Ann Fraser
     
 

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He's been Student of the Week, but will I.Q. ever get a library card?

When Mrs. Furber announces that it's Library Week, I.Q. can't be more excited. During his first visit, I.Q. makes the amazing discovery that he can borrow books once he gets his own library card. He wants to take out the funny book that Mrs. Binder, the librarian, reads to the class.

Each day

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Overview

He's been Student of the Week, but will I.Q. ever get a library card?

When Mrs. Furber announces that it's Library Week, I.Q. can't be more excited. During his first visit, I.Q. makes the amazing discovery that he can borrow books once he gets his own library card. He wants to take out the funny book that Mrs. Binder, the librarian, reads to the class.

Each day that week, I.Q. has a lot of fun learning about all the different materials and types of books at the library. But I.Q. worries that he'll never be able to find the funny book. And he still needs someone to sign his permission slip for a library card. Will he be able to borrow a book like the other students?

I.Q. is as endearing as ever as he learns the joys and responsibilities of being a card-carrying library user.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
I.Q. Goes to the Library by Mary Ann Fraser follows the classroom mouse first introduced in I.Q. Goes to School. Here, he is tickled when the school librarian reads a funny book to his class. He returns to the library every day in search of the book she read (meanwhile he learns about the different types of books available there). What he really wants is his own library card so he can check out the funny book for himself. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
I. Q., the mouse class pet, goes to the library every day of Library Week and learns how the library is organized, what he can find there, and along with the other children, checks out a book. A trim, brown-skinned librarian introduces the multicultural (and, in the case of the mouse at least, multi-species) classroom to the pleasures of reading, too, with a funny read-aloud that I. Q. finally finds. While National Library Week is celebrated in 2004 from April 18 to 24, any week can be declared Library Week with the implied activities and learning here as a model. Mrs. Binder has daily rhymed reminders that appear within the illustrations and as endpapers: "Save your place without a trace. Use a bookmark." Or, "Return or renew when your book is due." Fraser's full-color illustrations are funny and fun to look at, the mouse as humanesque character behaves like a mouse in pushing around the computer mouse or jumping on the computer keys to type a title search. It is entertaining, and good for you, too. 2003, Walker, Ages 6 to 10.
— Susan Hepler, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-Ever since his first adventure in I.Q. Goes to School (Walker, 2002), the little mouse has had an unquenchable thirst for knowledge. He loves learning new things with the students in the elementary school classroom that is his home. In his latest outing, he joins the class as they visit their library during Library Week and learns all about its many resources. Fraser's simple story provides a satisfactory overview of the materials and services available in a contemporary school media center. The book's clean layout and design feature nicely understated but loving details such as thematically consistent endpapers and visual storytelling that begins on the title page. Like I.Q., this winning picture book should find a comfortable home in any school or library setting.-Catherine Threadgill, Charleston County Public Library, SC Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Opening and closing with a handful of precious but on-target ground rules-"To keep the books looking new, never mark, draw, cut, or glue"-this barely disguised tutorial follows a mouse and his human classmates through a week's worth of visits to their school library. I.Q. wants the storybook Mrs. Binder, the librarian, reads on Monday, and on each successive day he gets closer to finding it-meanwhile discovering the fiction, nonfiction, and nonprint sections, making a bookmark, using the online catalogue, and at last getting his own library card. Though tiny, I.Q. attracts no more attention than a child would as he scurries about Fraser's bright, inviting, sometimes realistically disheveled media center. Like Gail Gibbons's Check It Out! (1985) or Marc Brown's D.W.'s Library Card (2001), this artfully conveys both the basics of how most libraries are organized, and a sense of why they're the place to be. (Picture book. 5-7)
Booklist
"A sure bet."

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802788771
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Publication date:
01/01/2003
Series:
I.Q book Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.76(w) x 10.25(h) x 0.42(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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