Irish History and the Irish Question

Irish History and the Irish Question

by Goldwin Smith
     
 

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Irish History and the Irish Question by Goldwin Smith.
This book is a reproduction of the original book published in 1905 and may have some imperfections such as marks or hand-written notes.

Overview

Irish History and the Irish Question by Goldwin Smith.
This book is a reproduction of the original book published in 1905 and may have some imperfections such as marks or hand-written notes.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781534913998
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
06/25/2016
Pages:
280
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.59(d)

Read an Excerpt


IV Thus the day of the Elizabethan era which dawned so brightly upon England came on in heavy clouds for the unhappy dependency. The religious compromise which it brought to England was adapted by the English statesmen who framed it to the religious condition and temperament of their own people. To the condition and temperament of the Irish people there was no such adaptation. To the Catholic lords of the Pale the Elizabethan religion was alien; to the native Celts it was not only alien, but utterly abhorrent. It presented itself, not as the religion of Ireland, but as the religion of the conqueror. The ecclesiastical polity comprised in the Act of Uniformity and the Thirty-nine Articles was, however, formally extended to Ireland, and the Crown resumed the powers which it had assumed in the time of Henry VIII. or his son, including the appointment of bishops, in this case without the veil, retained in England, of the conge d'elire. In the dependency as in England, the State assumed supreme power of religious legislation, overriding and almost treating as null the authority of the ecclesiastical Convocation. Propagation of the Anglican liturgy beyond the Pale continued to be blocked by the language. Burleigh and the other statesmen of Elizabeth's Council could not fail to turn their minds to the Irish problem, enhanced as its gravity had been by the progress of religious revolution in Europe and the danger of a conflict with the Catholic powers. Trinity College is a noble monument of their policy. In Ireland, as in England, they restored the coin, though the benefits of that wise measure were offset by protectionist enactments carried in the Parliament of the Pale, which bore theusual fruits. They sent commissioners of inquiry to give them more trustworthy information ...

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