Irish Hunger: Personal Reflections on the Legacy of the Famine

Irish Hunger: Personal Reflections on the Legacy of the Famine

by Tom Hayden
     
 

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In Irish Hunger, renowned Irish and Irish-American contributors-actors and activists, poets and journalists, politician and historian-offer moving commentaries and modern perspectives on the events of such tragic proportions that it continues to shape the Irish psyche on both sides of the Atlantic.

Overview

In Irish Hunger, renowned Irish and Irish-American contributors-actors and activists, poets and journalists, politician and historian-offer moving commentaries and modern perspectives on the events of such tragic proportions that it continues to shape the Irish psyche on both sides of the Atlantic.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Commemorating the 150th anniversary of "Black '47," the worst year of the Irish potato famine, California state senator Hayden here collects pieces by 29 Irish and Irish American writers about the disaster and what it means to the Irish today. David Lloyd remarks on Sinad O'Connor's song "Famine," and on the "keening" that takes place in it and how these banshee famine shrieks follow the Irish to this day. Jimmy Breslin examines the fungi that brought the famine and sees it transplanted to the U.S. in the form of bigotry. New York Observer columnist Terry Golway comments on the conservative politics of the modern American Irish and tells how hunger striker Bobby Sands saved him from the fate of becoming a "Reagan Democrat." Irish actor Gabriel Byrne takes us on a "famine walk" and reminds us that "the past is always with us." James S. Donnelly Jr. looks at "revisionist" history and tries to find a middle ground between holocaust and indifference. Michael Collins biographer Tim Pat Coogan ponders British duplicity and brings it into the Northern Ireland political perspective of today. Irish-American Peggy O'Brian transports us to the other side, as she emigrates back to Ireland from Massachusetts. There are also poems by Eavan Boland and Seamus Heaney. This perspective looks at the historical, social and political facets of the famine, and allows us to reflect on how it happened and how it continues to haunt the Irish to this day. (June)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781568332017
Publisher:
Rinehart, Roberts Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
05/01/1997
Pages:
296
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Author of the famed Port Huron Statement, TOM HAYDEN was a leader in the student, antiwar, and civil rights protests in the 1960s. He took up the environmental cause in the 1970s, leading campaigns to shut down nuclear power plants and serving as California's first solar energy official. He was elected to the Califorinia legislature in 1982, serving for eighteen years. He continues to write as an editor of The Nation, and has taught at many campuses from Harvard's Institute of Politics to UCLA's labor studies center.

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