Iron and Diamonds

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David McGee
Who knew that Tom Petty could write a bluegrass come-on song? Eric and Leigh Gibson, that's who. The ever-more-impressive brother duo open their fourth album with a feisty treatment of Petty's "Cabin Down Below," their sibling harmonies at once keening and suggestive, with Clayton Campbell's jagged fiddle soloing and Rick Hayes's tart mandolin lines setting the proper ambiance for the brothers' engaging shot at friendly persuasion. But the Gibsons are making a habit of finding first-rate material to cover: here they capture what they call the "honky tonkin' grass" of Steve Earle's "The Other Side of Town" in a swell of rich harmony singing and Campbell's evocative twin ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David McGee
Who knew that Tom Petty could write a bluegrass come-on song? Eric and Leigh Gibson, that's who. The ever-more-impressive brother duo open their fourth album with a feisty treatment of Petty's "Cabin Down Below," their sibling harmonies at once keening and suggestive, with Clayton Campbell's jagged fiddle soloing and Rick Hayes's tart mandolin lines setting the proper ambiance for the brothers' engaging shot at friendly persuasion. But the Gibsons are making a habit of finding first-rate material to cover: here they capture what they call the "honky tonkin' grass" of Steve Earle's "The Other Side of Town" in a swell of rich harmony singing and Campbell's evocative twin fiddling, step it up and go on Julie Miller's "Somewhere Trouble Don't Go," find the eternal wound on the heartbreaking "A World So Full of Love," and wind up on sacred ground in a soaring, high-lonesome treatment of Bill Carlisle's "Gone Home," all cascading voices and fiddle work. And yet their own original songs, eight on this album, stand toe-to-toe with the covers. The title track is a dark, winsome reminiscence from their childhood, detailing the abiding toil of miners' lives and the Sunday afternoon release of community baseball games (hence the "Diamonds" in the title). A piercing chronicle of post-breakup blues, the loping tear-jerker "Lonely Me, Lonely You" features Eric's lovely, lower-strings acoustic guitar solo and Mike Barber's upright bass supplying a mournful pulse for the close, crying vocal harmonies. "Picker's Blues" laments the looming disasters in the musician's life, but the dozen diamonds here suggest that, for the Gibson Brothers, it's all worthwhile.
All Music Guide - J. Poet
The Gibson Brothers play a low-key, emotional style of bluegrass with some country and early rock influences. Their close sibling harmonies place them firmly within the bluegrass continuum while their fine songwriting helps expand the music's parameters. "Picker's Blues" is a good example, a tune that talks about music making with a combination of pride and self-effacing humor. The instrumental prowess of the brothers and their band belies the modesty they bring to the lyric when they sing "It's all been done before..." Two voices, a simple bassline,and spare guitar chords accent "Lonely Me, Lonely You," a classic of close harmony singing, with Eric Gibson's guitar solo adding a beautiful jazzy touch to the arrangement. "It's a Long Way Down" is a perfect song of disillusion and heartache, another country-influenced track. The singer wallows in his heartache and warns his departed lover of life's perils while the music bubbles happily in the background. "Iron & Diamonds" is an autobiographical song about growing up near Lyon Mountain in the Adirondacks, a place obsessed with mining and baseball. Eric Gibson's banjo and Clayton Campbell's fiddle give the story of hard labor and broken dreams a morose, funereal mood. The tunes the Brothers choose to cover are always given surprising new arrangements. They make over Tom Petty's "Cabin Down Below" into a down-home celebration of country living while Steve Earle's "The Other Side of Town" is acoustic honky tonk music at its best, with Junior Barber's resonator guitar adding pedal steel-like fills. The brothers give Julie Miller's sardonic "Somewhere Trouble Don't Go" a bluegrass bounce that takes some of the sting out its dark lyric. "A World So Full of Love," by Roger Miller and Faron Young sports a great brokenhearted lyric and some clever wordplay. The Gibson's harmonies make the song a winner.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 4/8/2008
  • Label: Sugarhill
  • UPC: 015891403922
  • Catalog Number: 4039
  • Sales rank: 94,333

Album Credits

Performance Credits
The Gibson Brothers Primary Artist
Junior Barber Guitar (Resonator), Weissenborn
Eric Gibson Banjo, Guitar, Rhythm Guitar, Vocals
Leigh Gibson Guitar, Rhythm Guitar, Vocals
Rick Hayes Mandolin
Technical Credits
Faron Young Composer
Tom Petty Composer
Bill Carlisle Composer
Julie Miller Composer
Dave Sinko Engineer, Mastering
Lane Gibson Engineer
Eric Gibson Composer, Producer, Liner Notes
Leigh Gibson Composer, Producer, Liner Notes
Patrick Granado Engineer
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