Iron River: A Charlie Hood Novel [NOOK Book]

Overview

Along the U.S./Mexico border, a man named Finnegan wakes up in the border-town of Buenavista after a hit and run-eerily aware of events he should know nothing about, $90,000 richer, and with Charlie Hood's name and address in his wallet.

Meanwhile when tracking the flow of illegal guns into Mexico, Hood's team accidentally kills the son of Benjamin Armenta, head of the Gulf Cartel and one of the most violent men in the world. Now, Hood must ...
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Iron River: A Charlie Hood Novel

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Overview

Along the U.S./Mexico border, a man named Finnegan wakes up in the border-town of Buenavista after a hit and run-eerily aware of events he should know nothing about, $90,000 richer, and with Charlie Hood's name and address in his wallet.

Meanwhile when tracking the flow of illegal guns into Mexico, Hood's team accidentally kills the son of Benjamin Armenta, head of the Gulf Cartel and one of the most violent men in the world. Now, Hood must work to grasp the enigmatic forces fighting for control of Buenavista- forces that circle back to Finnegan, and to Armenta's unstoppable plan for brutal vengeance.


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  • T. Jefferson Parker
    T. Jefferson Parker  

Editorial Reviews

Richard Lipez
…artful and frightening…The suspense in Iron River is terrific, and the atmospherics dense and convincing, but it's the social observations that really stick with you.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
In bestseller Parker's disappointing third Charlie Hood novel (after The Renegades), Hood, a Los Angeles sheriff's deputy, joins Operation Blowdown, an attempt to staunch the near constant flow of money and guns across the U.S.-Mexican border. When a shootout during a botched weapons buy leaves the son of the head of a powerful Mexican cartel dead, the fight becomes personal as cartel soldiers cross the border to take revenge on Hood's team. Meanwhile, a faulty product has driven Pace Arms, a family-owned gun manufacturer, nearly to bankruptcy. Unbeknownst to Hood, the man brokering an illegal deal between Pace and another Mexican cartel chief for the production of a revolutionary handgun is Bradley Smith (aka Bradley Jones), the son of bank robber Allison Murrietta, the antiheroine of L.A. Outlaws, the first and best entry in the series. In this installment, the massive scale of the criminal activity overwhelms the characters. (Jan.)
Los Angeles Times
Parker's concise prose, at once low-key and lyrical, plays almost like cowboy poetry.
Providence Journal on The Renegades
A masterpiece of postmodern noir. Here is a brilliant craftsman and storyteller at the height of his powers.
Kirkus Reviews
Deputy Charlie Hood (The Renegades, 2009, etc.) copes with love, war and a baffling being who might be an angel, a demon, conceivably both, or none of the above. Detached from the L.A. Sheriff's Department, Deputy Hood is sent south to join Operation Blowdown, assembled to war against the much-too-successful Mexican drug cartels. It's an overwhelmingly difficult job, never-ending and ever-perilous. As evidence of this, Jimmy Holdstock, one of Charlie's young colleagues, is suddenly snatched by a particularly ruthless cartel-object: torture, mutilation and the kind of prolonged, very public death wickedly calculated to dampen law-enforcement enthusiasm. In the immediate aftermath of the kidnapping, an envelope arrives at Blowdown headquarters, containing a pair of Polaroids. Pictured in one is a dramatically ill-treated Jimmy; in the other, a still-life formed by "a pair of pliers, an electric circular saw, and a long-nozzled barbecue lighter." Clearly, Jimmy needs to be rescued fast. Meanwhile, Mike Finnegan, a strange little man who might furnish some helpful answers resides, severely injured, in the ICU of Buenavista Hospital. He sends for Charlie. The two have never met, but Charlie can't ignore the existence of a peculiar sort of connection between them. They talk. Finnegan wants Charlie to find his missing daughter and offers a quid pro quo that may or may not pertain to the beset Jimmy. The little man-nothing if not mysterious-knows things he can't possibly: about Blowdown, about Charlie's private life. Moreover, he really should have died as the result of his injuries, and not even lovely, smart Dr. Beth Petty can explain his survival. So who or what is Mike Finnegan? It'sanybody's guess. Lacks the seamlessness of Parker's best plotting, but indomitable Charlie is, as always, irresistible. Hard not to warm to a man who-no matter the adversity-insists that "Hope counts."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101159743
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 1/5/2010
  • Series: Charlie Hood Novel , #3
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 176,785
  • File size: 393 KB

Meet the Author

T. Jefferson Parker
T. Jefferson Parker is the bestselling author of fifteen previous novels, including L.A. Outlaws and Storm Runners. Along with Dick Francis and James Lee Burke, he is one of only three two-time recipients of the Edgar Award for Best Novel. Parker lives with his family in Southern California.

Biography

One of the best loved crime writers of our time, T. Jefferson Parker was born in Los Angeles and has lived all of his life in Southern California. The poster boy for Orange County, he enjoyed an almost idyllic childhood bodysurfing, playing in Little League, and enjoying family outings with his parents and siblings. He was educated in public schools in Orange County and received his bachelor's degree in English from the University of California, Irvine, in 1976. (He was honored in 1992 as the University's Distinguished Alumnus.)

His writing career began in 1978 as a cub reporter on the weekly newspaper, The Newport Ensign. After covering crime, city hall, and local culture for the Ensign, Parker moved on to the Daily Pilot newspaper, where he won three Orange County Press Club awards for his articles. During this time, he filed away information he would later use to develop characters and plot points for his novels.

Published in 1985, Parker's first book, Laguna Heat, was written in whatever spare time he could find during his stint as a reporter. The book received rave reviews and was made into an HBO movie starring Harry Hamlin, Jason Robards and Rip Torn.

Since that auspicious beginning, Parker has made a name for himself with smart, savvy bestsellers dealing with crime, life, and death in sunny Southern California. In 2001, he hit the jackpot with Silent Joe, a bittersweet thriller that won the Mystery Writers of America's coveted Edgar Award for Best Novel. In 2004, he repeated the feat with Califoria Girl, making him one of only two writers (the other is James Lee Burke) ever to have won two Best Novel Edgars. Among other honors and accolades, Parker has won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Best Mystery/Thriller and the Southern California Booksellers Award for Best Novel of the Year. His books continue to score big on the national bestseller lists.

Good To Know

The "T" in Parker's name doesn't really stand for anything. His mother once told him she thought it would look good on the presidential letterhead!

In an interview with hardluckstories.com, Parker explained how his definition of noir has altered: "It seems to me that since 9/11 our appetites for darkness have shrunk a little. Mine have. I know that as a writer I've tried to bring more breadth and humanity to my stories. I think when all is said and done, a noir attitude is fine, but it's still just an attitude, a pose.

Parker's first wife, Catherine, died of a brain tumor at a very young age. He has since remarried happily.

In an interview with Harlan Coben, Parker was asked about the state of crime writing, i.e., what's wrong and what's right with it. "I think the Achilles heel of mystery/crime writing is character," he responded. "You have to have good characters—and sometimes I think mystery writers rely to heavily on plot and velocity of plot at the expense of characters."

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    1. Hometown:
      Fallbrook, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      December 26, 1953
    2. Place of Birth:
      Los Angeles, California
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, University of California-Irvine, 1976
    2. Website:

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 17 of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2013

    Not the best T. Jefferson Parker novel

    I was very disappointed in this novel. There were way too many characters and it seemed to go nowhere.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 8, 2012

    Fast Moving but violent and grim

    This paints a frightening picture of the lack of control on the Mexican border. Informative - but I won't be choosing this author again. I read one other book and it was also grim.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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