The Iroquois by Emily J. Dolbear, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
The Iroquois

The Iroquois

by Emily J. Dolbear
     
 

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Who are the Three Sisters?

These "sisters" are actually crops-corn, beans, and squash-that were often grown together by the Iroquois.

Inside, You'll Find:

The role of the Iroquois in the American Revolution;

Maps, a timeline, photos-and what Iroquois homes were like;

Surprising TRUE facts that will shock and amaze you!

Overview

Who are the Three Sisters?

These "sisters" are actually crops-corn, beans, and squash-that were often grown together by the Iroquois.

Inside, You'll Find:

The role of the Iroquois in the American Revolution;

Maps, a timeline, photos-and what Iroquois homes were like;

Surprising TRUE facts that will shock and amaze you!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Patrick Hunter
Finally, a volume of the "A True Book" series that gives Native American women and a tribe as a whole the due exploration they deserve. Dolbear and Benoit's The Iroquois contains a chapter of ten pages on the roles of men and women in Iroquois society. I am pleased to say that the attention given to the information about the importance that women had in the Iroquois is to be admired. Women in Iroquois society had a lot of power. Lineage in Iroquois society was set up in clans with mothers as the head. They owned the home, land and horses. This ownership did not transfer to men when women married and if a man and woman separated what she owned and the children from the marriage remained with the woman's clan. Female leaders were called clan mothers. These clan mothers decided how land was handed out; could name and remove chiefs; chose other leaders and ratified treaties. In essence, women were equal to men. I was very pleased to read this because it's true. While the end of the discussion is sadly tempered with the statement the power women had was "unusual for the time" I was still glad to see something of an evenhanded representation of the power structure of men and women within Native communities. The other aspect of Iroquois history that is given ample attention is the League of Nations the Iroquois constructed. Originally, the Iroquois were not a single tribe. They were separate tribes who were often fighting each other. Eventually, according to Iroquois history, the tribes were encouraged to make peace. By working together they could all achieve common goals. Under this new direction for the tribe they established a Great Law of Peace. It is this Law of Peace that is believed to be the inspiration for the Constitution of the United States. Other chapters cover the Iroquois encounters with Europeans and Iroquois home and family. Within the later chapter, readers learn that Iroquois leaved in longhouses that could be as large as a football field. Also of note is the game Iroquois played that is believed to be the inspiration for modern day Lacrosse. Among the "A True Book" series, this volume is probably the most interesting. The information is detailed, fresh, more accurate, and less sexist and Arian-centric than some of the other studies in the series; especially those done in conjunction with Kevin Cunningham. Included in the back of The Iroquois is a list of additional resources; print and web, as well as a glossary and index. Glossary terms are highlighted in the text. Colorful photographs with equally colorful fonts accentuate the text. A good resource on the Iroquois people for schools and libraries, though the price does seem a bit steep for the 40 or so pages of information. If you can, compare with other literature before making a final decision. Reviewer: Patrick Hunter

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531207710
Publisher:
Scholastic Library Publishing
Publication date:
03/01/2011
Series:
A True Book
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
850L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 10 Years

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