Is Journalism Worth Dying For?: Final Dispatches [NOOK Book]

Overview

A collection of final dispatches by the famed journalist, including the first translation of the work that may have led to her murder

Anna Politkovskaya won international fame for her courageous reporting. Is Journalism Worth Dying For? is a long-awaited collection of her final writing.

Beginning with a brief introduction by the author about her pariah status, the book ...
See more details below
Is Journalism Worth Dying For?: Final Dispatches

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price
(Save 44%)$19.95 List Price

Overview

A collection of final dispatches by the famed journalist, including the first translation of the work that may have led to her murder

Anna Politkovskaya won international fame for her courageous reporting. Is Journalism Worth Dying For? is a long-awaited collection of her final writing.

Beginning with a brief introduction by the author about her pariah status, the book contains essays that characterize the self-effacing Politkovskaya more fully than she allowed in her other books. From deeply personal statements about the nature of journalism, to horrendous reports from Chechnya, to sensitive pieces of memoir, to, finally, the first translation of the series of investigative reports that Politkovskaya was working on at the time of her murder—pieces many believe led to her assassination.

Elsewhere, there are illuminating accounts of encounters with leaders including Lionel Jospin, Tony Blair, George W. Bush, and such exiled figures as Boris Berezovsky, Akhmed Zakaev,  Vladimir Bukovsky. Additional sections collect Politkovskaya’s non-political writing, revealing her delightful wit, deep humanity, and willingness to engage with the unfamiliar, as well as her deep regrets about the fate of Russia.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Dwight Garner
…moving on multiple levels, and one of them is for the glimpse it provides of the writer Ms. Politkovskaya might have been if she had made her career in a different time and place. Her warmth and gregarious humanity flood the margins of this volume, placing the horrors she witnessed in an even more appalling light…Is Journalism Worth Dying For? is a book of sustained moral witness…a plangent document of journalistic heroism.
—The New York Times
Megan Buskey
This book…will allow English speakers to appreciate fully how knowledgeable and dogged a journalist [Politkovskaya] was.
—The New York Times Book Review
From the Publisher
Praise for Is Journalism Worth Dying For?

"Is Journalism Worth Dying For? is a book of sustained moral witness....a plangent document of journalistic heroism."
Dwight Garner, New York Times 

"Of all the investigative reporters I've been acquainted with, Politkovskaya might have embodied the most remarkable combination of courage (some might call it foolhardiness) and talent...Is Journalism Worth Dying For? is a marvelous testament to her courage and skill."
Steve Weinberg, San Francisco Chronicle

"There is pathos and sorrow in these pages, but also hope and lightness...beautifully, even lyrically, written."
Michael J. Bonafield, Minneapolis Star Tribune

"Her enduring importance derives from her refusal to capitulate despite seemingly unbearable pressure—and, even more basically, her commitment to rigorous on-the-ground reporting when journalists, even when not faced with official intimidation, spend more time with PR flacks than sources and vicitims."
Jason Farago, Barnes and Noble Review 

"An essential book for budding Russia hands, followers of world events and fans of good journalism."
Kirkus Reviews, starred review 

"An inspiring collection."
Booklist

Praise for Anna Politkovskaya

“Suppression of freedom of speech, of expression, reaches its savage ultimate in the murder of a writer. Anna Politkovskaya refused to lie in her work; her murder is a ghastly act, and an attack on world literature.”
—Nadine Gordimer

"Anna Politkovskaya defined the human conscience. Her relentless pursuit of the truth in the face of danger and darkness testifies to her distinguished place in journalism—and humanity.” —Christiane Amanpour, anchor of ABC News This Week

“She is the voice of conscience faced with brutal inhumanity and the peril that goes with it. But this superb collection of the pieces she wrote for Novaya gazeta adds another dimension. It measures her as a journalist against other journalists round the world. It reveals a superb original technician.”
—Peter Preston, The Observer

“Like all great investigative reporters, Anna Politkovskaya brought forward human truths that rewrote the official story. We will continue to read her, and learn from her, for years.”
—Salman Rushdie

Kirkus Reviews

"It is generally accepted that we Russians do not like ourselves much." So wrote the late Politkovskaya (1958–2006) (Putin's Russia, 2006, etc.), who paid with her life for her daring critiques of post-Soviet society.

This spirited collection, originally published by the journalNovaya Gazetain 2007, opens with a self-interview taken from the journalist's laptop after her death. In it, she accuses most of her journalistic colleagues in Russia with beingkoverny, or clowns, "whose job it is to keep the public entertained and, if they do have to write about anything serious, then merely to tell everyone how wonderful the Pyramid of Power is in all its manifestations." The big-shoe phenomenon spreads far beyond Russia, of course, and Politkovskaya is not alone when she asks what the fate of those who refuse to play in the Big Top is—"They become pariahs," she answers, though in her case it was worse still. Much of the collection concerns Russia's war in Chechnya, which has quieted down since, but, only a few years ago, was raging—no thanks to orchestrated atrocities on the part of the Russian Army that Politkovskaya covered and uncovered. One was the so-called Shatoy Tragedy, in which Russian soldiers under the command of the Central Intelligence Directorate killed six Chechen civilians and burned their bodies. Politkovskaya's reportage is far from objective, in the vaunted Anglo-American sense. Her ledes build around terms such as "massive violation of human rights" and "the racketeering that pervades the Republic," recounting the misdeeds of plutocrats and bureaucrats, and otherwise offering news and commentary from what she called "the furthest end of the Old World." Even the less pointed touches—travel notes from Europe and Australia, a brief memoir of living with an elderly dog—are sharp in their none-too-veiled view of a society that should be better than it is.

An essential book for budding Russia hands, followers of world events and fans of good journalism.

The Barnes & Noble Review

For Anna Politkovskaya, Russia was a grim country -- a "managed democracy" governed by brutal leaders and craven bureaucrats, policed by violent and extortionist security services, and reported on only by "servants of the Presidential Administration." Her crusading, obsessive journalism made her many enemies, not least inside the Kremlin; she endured beatings, poisoning, and a mock execution; but she did not back down. Murdered in 2006, her killers never found, Politkovskaya lives on in Is Journalism Worth Dying For?, a collection of her "final dispatches."

Politkovskaya's greatest and most dangerous work was done in Chechnya, the functionally lawless region which foreign and even Russian journalists refused to enter, but to which she returned more than two dozen times. It is a terrifying place, where anarchic paramilitaries roam the streets with Berettas, politicians hit up citizens for cash, and opponents of the regime are abducted and thrown into jail cells dug into the ground, if they're not killed with impunity. And there is characteristically fearless reporting on the 2002 siege of a Moscow theater by Chechen terrorists, during which Politkovskaya attempted to negotiate with the militants to release hundreds of hostages before Russian authorities gassed the theater, killing at least 130 people. Politkovskaya argues that federal security services abetted the terrorists, a claim backed up with evidence from the former spy Alexander Litvinenko -- who was himself murdered a few months after Politkovskaya, poisoned with polonium at a London sushi joint.

Not all of Politkovskaya's dispatches make such forbidding reading; there are easier reports from Paris and Sydney, and even a long and surprisingly tender essay on her dog. But her enduring importance derives from her refusal to capitulate despite seemingly unbearable pressure -- and, even more basically, her commitment to rigorous on-the-ground reporting when journalists, even when not faced with official intimidation, spend more time with PR flacks than sources and victims. Upon her death, Lech Walesa mourned her as "a sentinel for truth," and Condoleezza Rice called her "a heroine of mine"; for the New York Times, she stood as "a symbol of what Russia has become." Only Ramzan Kadyrov, the Kremlin-installed gangster president of Chechnya and a key suspect in her murder, was unmoved. "I was not bothered in the slightest by what she wrote," he insisted, "and I have never lowered myself to trying to settle scores with women."

--Jason Farago




Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781935554707
  • Publisher: Melville House Publishing
  • Publication date: 4/5/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 1,297,812
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

ANNA POLITKOVSKAYA (born 1958 in New York City) was a special correspondent for the Russian newspaper Novaya gazeta and the author of A Dirty War; A Small Corner of Hell; Putin’s Russia; and A Russian Diary. She was murdered in Moscow on October 7, 2006.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

"I will not go into all the joys of the path I have chosen: the poisoning, the arrests, the menacing by mail and over the Internet, the telephoned death threats. The main thing is to get on with my job, to describe the life I see, to receive visitors every day in our newspaper’s offices....What am I guilty of? I have merely reported what I witnessed, nothing but the truth."
--From an article found on Anna Politkovskaya’s computer after her death; it is addressed to her readers abroad


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 Should Lives Be Sacrificed to Journalism? 7

2 The War in Chechnya 25

Part I Dispatches from the Frontline 27

Part II The Protagonists 79

Part III The Kadyrovs 113

3 The Cadet 173

4 Nord-Ost 221

5 Beslan 251

6 Russia: A Country at Peace 279

7 Planet Earth: The World Beyond Russia 297

8 The Other Anna 349

9 The Last Pieces 377

10 After October 7 387

Glossary 451

Index 459

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)