Is Menstruation Obsolete? / Edition 1

Is Menstruation Obsolete? / Edition 1

2.0 1
by Elsimar M. Coutinho
     
 

ISBN-10: 0195130219

ISBN-13: 9780195130218

Pub. Date: 10/28/1999

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Is Menstruation Obsolete? argues that regular monthly bleeding is not the "natural" state of women, and that it actually places them at risk of several medical conditions of varying severity. The authors maintain that while menstruation may be culturally significant, it is not medically meaningful. Moreover, they propose that suppressing menstruation has

Overview

Is Menstruation Obsolete? argues that regular monthly bleeding is not the "natural" state of women, and that it actually places them at risk of several medical conditions of varying severity. The authors maintain that while menstruation may be culturally significant, it is not medically meaningful. Moreover, they propose that suppressing menstruation has remarkable health advantages.
Because of cultural changes, shorter durations of breast feeding, and birth control, the reproductive patterns of modern women no longer resemble that of their Stone age ancestors. Women have moved from the age of incessant reproduction to the age of incessant menstruation. Consequently, they often suffer from clinical disorders related to menstruation: anemia, endometriosis, and PMS, just to name a few. The authors encourage readers to recognize what has gone previously unnoticed that this monthly discomfort is simply not obligatory. They present compelling evidence that the suppression of menstruation is a viable option for women today, and that it can be easily attained through the use of birth control pills. In fact, they reveal that contraceptive manufacturers, knowing that many women equate menstruation with femininity and that without monthly bleeding would fear that they were pregnant, engineered pill dosage regimens to ensure the continuation of their cycles. Indeed, throughout history societies have assigned menstruation powerful meaning, and Is Menstruation Obsolete? presents a fascinating history of how menstruation inspired doctors to try therapeutic bleeding for a variety of ailments, and how this therapy remained dominant in Western medicine until the early 20th century.
Is Menstruation Obsolete? offers women a fresh view of menstruation, providing them with the information they need to make progressive choices about their health. This is a message whose time has come.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195130218
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
10/28/1999
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
208
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.90(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword
Preface
Introduction
1. Menstruation in Western Civilization
2. Menstruation: The Basis of Therapeutic Bloodletting
3. Why Women Menstruate
4. Premenstrual Syndrome
5. Menstrual Cycle-Related Disorders
6. Natural Suppression of Menstruation
7. Medical Suppression of Menstruation
8. In Support of Menstruation
9. Absence of Menstruation and Disease
10. Conclusion
Glossary
Bibliographic Essay
Index

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Is Menstruation Obsolete? 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
These guys are well, guys. When left to attune with the world (and women ) around them, women usually fall in alignment with the moon's cycle. This is no accident. Our nature is more than biologic, it's spiritual-(read The Wise Wound by Penelope Shuttle and Peter Redgrove) I trust nature alot more then a man -who has invented all sorts of CURES that make patients sicker or worse dead- to keep my body healthy, women's nature is cyclic, as opposed to a men's which is more focused and linear. Are the authors truly trying to prevent dis-ease in women? Or are these dr's playing God/dess again? Women are different from men, and our menstrual capacity makes us different , I for one wouldn't trade this gift, even if they could guarantee me that I would be disease free till the end.