Is There Life After Death?: The Extraordinary Science of What Happens When We Die

Is There Life After Death?: The Extraordinary Science of What Happens When We Die

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by Anthony Peake
     
 

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Do you occasionally have that strange feeling known as déjà vu? Do you sometimes feel that you know what is going to happen next? Do you ever have a strong feeling that actions you are about to take are the right (or wrong) thing to do? All these perceptions may be everyday clues to your immortality. This book proposes a simply amazing theory—a

Overview

Do you occasionally have that strange feeling known as déjà vu? Do you sometimes feel that you know what is going to happen next? Do you ever have a strong feeling that actions you are about to take are the right (or wrong) thing to do? All these perceptions may be everyday clues to your immortality. This book proposes a simply amazing theory—a theory that states that personal death is a scientific impossibility. Using the latest findings of neurology, quantum physics, and consciousness studies, Anthony Peake suggests that we never die. After reading this book you will understand the reason for your life and how you can make it better next time.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781848372993
Publisher:
Arcturus Publishing Limited
Publication date:
01/30/2012
Pages:
416
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 1.25(d)

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Meet the Author

Anthony Peake is a qualified psychometrician, divisional human resources manager for Nuffield Hospitals, and has over twenty years experience researching the structure of consciousness and quantum mechanics.

 

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Is There Life After Death?: The Extraordinary Science of What Happens When We Die 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read similar books about death and consciousness. This book was largely disappointing, as it uses evidence from the 19th and early/mid-20th century as proof. While the beginning chapters on physics are somewhat intriguing, I feel that he often makes conclusive statements about scientific theories that show something quite different from what he seems to conclude. Also, he uses literary references and anecdotal accounts (from the 1800s no less) as evidence to support his thesis. In addition, I looked up some of the concepts and ideas mentioned in the book, and from what I found it seems that he has not quite hit the nail on the head with some of these. All this together left me a bit suspicious about his ideas, and disappointed in the book. .