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Is There Room on the Feather Bed?
     

Is There Room on the Feather Bed?

by Libba Moore Gray, Nadine Bernard Westcott (Illustrator)
 

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This spirited cumulative tale tells what happens when the rains come and, one by one, a green-headed goose, a yellow-billed duck, woolly white sheep, speckled black hen, fat pink pig, furry brown dog, orange-spotted cow, and grinning gray cat come knocking at the door of a wee fat woman and her wee fat husband. Full color.

Overview

This spirited cumulative tale tells what happens when the rains come and, one by one, a green-headed goose, a yellow-billed duck, woolly white sheep, speckled black hen, fat pink pig, furry brown dog, orange-spotted cow, and grinning gray cat come knocking at the door of a wee fat woman and her wee fat husband. Full color.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Bad weather makes for strange-and funny-bedfellows in this charming cumulative fable of friendship. During a torrential rainfall, a "wee fat man and a wee fat woman" invite a parade of farm animals into their "teeny tiny house" to share their big feather bed-but will be there be room on the bed for a drenched skunk, too? The goodhearted wee fat woman thinks so, but her close-minded bedmates (including her tubby husband) quickly vacate the premises-until they decide that it's better to share breakfast in bed with a skunk than face the downpour. Westcott's (Never Take a Pig to Lunch) cheerfully skewed cartoon illustrations capture the story's whimsy as well as its tempest-tossed drama. The pictures of the supine birds and animals luxuriating in bed, their wings stretched lazily across plump pillows or their hooves holding onto the coverlet, get funnier and funnier as the bed grows more populous. The late Gray (Dear Willie Rudd) cushions her tale with cozy language (the barnyard roster includes "a green-headed goose, a yellow-billed duck, a woolly white sheep," etc.), and kids will especially enjoy the rhyming refrain of the wee woman as each soggy animal supplicant appears on her doorstep: "Why bless your hearts,/ such a noise, such a fuss./ There's room on the feather bed/ for all of us." Ages 2-6. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Lisa Phillips
A wee fat man and a wee fat woman lived in a teeny tiny house near a clear running brook with a large family of animals. The animals include a green-headed goose, a yellow-billed duck, a wooly white sheep, a speckled black hen, a fat pink pig, a furry brown dog, an orange spotted cow, and a grinning gray cat. From time to time, a small plump skunk would stand up-wind watching the animals. But the other animals would run away when the skunk came too close. One day, the wind blew and the rain came so hard that the brook overflowed its banks. Just as the wee fat man and the wee fat woman were going to sleep for the night, the animals came knocking two-by-two at the door and they all piled into the couple's soft feather bed to get out of the rain. They had all just fallen asleep when the skunk tapped on the door and the wee fat woman helped him up onto the bed. As soon as the others realized the skunk was with them, they jumped out of bed and scattered into the dark wet night. Once outside, though, they all began to think about the soft, dry feather bed and the skunk all cozy inside. They realized how silly they'd been, and the wee fat woman invited all back in exclaiming, "There's room on the feather bed for all of us! So come back inside. Let's all be friends." The witty illustrations and rhyming refrain will delight children as they see how crowded the feather bed gets!
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2A catchy cumulative tale. The fun grows as an array of animals seeking shelter from a storm approaches a teeny tiny house. A wee fat woman assures them there's room for all on the feather bed until a skunk arrives on the scene. This book has the timeless ambiance of Jan Brett's The Mitten (Putnam, 1990). Children and storytellers will love its rhythm and cadence and will find themselves enchanted by its cheerful refrain. Equally impressive are Westcott's watercolor-and-ink paintings that fill every inch of space. The double-page spreads are bright and whimsical, adding just the right amount of humor to the playful story. A great choice to share with a group or to read one-on-one.Dawn Ibey, Vancouver Public Library, Canada
Kirkus Reviews
An old-fashioned treat—wacky art from Westcott paired with a reassuring and delightful cumulative text by Gray (Little Lil and the Swing-Singing Sax, 1996, etc.) that grows funnier with each reading.

A "wee fat man and a wee fat woman" live in a "teeny, tiny house at the bottom of a great green hill." Their extended family includes eight animals: a goose, a duck, a sheep, a hen, a pig, a dog, a cow, and a cat. A plump skunk tries to join in, but the animals keep their distance. When a rainstorm blows up one night, animal after animal, two by two, beg admittance to the house: "Honk honk honk,/Quack quack quack,/the rain is pouring/on our feathered backs." The woman is welcoming: "Why, bless your hearts,/such a noise, such a fuss./There's room on the feather bed/for all of us." The pages become more crowded with hilarious, eye-popping details until the moment when the skunk is admitted to the bed by the drowsy hostess. The result is satisfyingly predictable, making the book a lesson in tolerance disguised as a potential story-hour favorite.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531330135
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
03/28/1997
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
11.16(w) x 10.34(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
2 - 6 Years

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