Isabel and the Hungry Coyote / Isabel y el coyote hambriento

Overview

A little girl on her way to Grandma's house. A basket of goodies. A lurking scoundrel. Sound familiar? Yes, but this time, the Chihuahua Desert of the American southwest is the setting for a spiced-up retelling of the classic Little Red Riding Hood story. Spunky Isabel outwits the cunning coyote with self-reliance and daring. Fiery tamales and chili sauce are the villain's downfall.

Esther Szegedy uses the natural world of her Hawaiian ...
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NOOK Book (NOOK Kids - Bilingual Edition: English-Spanish)
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Overview

A little girl on her way to Grandma's house. A basket of goodies. A lurking scoundrel. Sound familiar? Yes, but this time, the Chihuahua Desert of the American southwest is the setting for a spiced-up retelling of the classic Little Red Riding Hood story. Spunky Isabel outwits the cunning coyote with self-reliance and daring. Fiery tamales and chili sauce are the villain's downfall.

Esther Szegedy uses the natural world of her Hawaiian paradise locale for inspiration. She likes to draw as she sits near the Pacific Ocean. Slabs of natural rock formed by volcanic lava flows often serve as her seat while she sketches. In Isabel and the Hungry Coyote / Isabel y el coyote hambriento Esther's rough pencil sketches turned into picturesque pastels that reveal the grainy texture of the desert sand to great advantage. Her deft use of water-soluble pastel crayons (Caran d'Ache®) on recycled paper brings the vivid purple, lush fuchsia and tranquil turquoise of the desert landscape into stunning focus and often into the comic arena. Esther's in-depth research of the Southwestern USA's flora and fauna brings forth both spirited illustrations and witty characterizations that make Isabel and the Hungry Coyote / Isabel y el coyote hambriento a special art treat as well as a 'read-it-again' story.

This book is embedded text format. The story is told in English and Spanish is sprinkled throughout the book within the context of the story.
A bilingual vocabulary page in English and Spanish is included to help readers learn keywords in either language.
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Editorial Reviews

Fearless Reviews
Isabel and the Hungry Coyote/Isabel y el coyote hambriento is a cute story, but the real charm is in the local color. Look for all the Mexican and southwestern wildlife in the pictures - horned toad, roadrunner, cacti, Yucca - all surprisingly recognizable in the stylized artwork. The blend of English and Spanish is entertaining too. This book is best for bilingual children or English speakers learning Spanish. Muy bueno!
Heartland Reviews
This is a wonderful bilingual picture book of a Southwest adaptation of Little Red Riding Hood. In this case, Mr. Coyote, is foiled not by a hunter or a woodsman, but by Red herself, who feeds him very hot chili peppers. Throughout the story, Spanish words are inserted, which match words in a glossary in the back. All in all, this is a cute story, cute pictures, and an effective teaching approach. We rated it five hearts.
Betsie's Literary Page
Nicely done and easily understood. This is a clever and delightful take-off from the original Little Red Riding Hood sprinkled with a southwest twist. Cuentos y leyendas of today. . . . In Isabel and the Hungry Coyote, stunning southwest graphics help bring back this tale of old with a bit of spice, reflecting the richness and diversity of Hispanic culture. . . . Easily understood by even the youngest reader and listener. Included is a vocabulary both in Spanish and English, which teachers and parents will find useful.
Children's Literature
Isabel is not the Red Riding Hood you once read about. This girl is Latina, bilingual and walks through a desert to bring tamales with chili sauce to her abuela. In similar fashion to previous tales, however, Isabel is trusting, and the tale begins as she innocently greets a sly coyote who plans to eat her and her grandmother. Unlike the traditional Red Riding Hood, Isabel is more than innocent, she is practical; After the coyote comments that her hood is beautiful, Isabel explains that it keeps the desert sun off her face. She is also generous; She offers the coyote a tamale. He recoils saying the food is too spicy—a fact that Isabel intelligently remembers later—and sets off for the grandmother's house. When the coyote tries to eat her, Isabel foils his plan by throwing hot, spicy tamales with chili sauce into his mouth. Luckily, Grandmother had not been eaten (she had been taking a siesta in the backyard) and Isabel is praised for showing courage and cleverness. This spicy retelling gives the traditional folktale new life. The illustrations which are colorful, soft and whimsical, match the character of Isabel, the clever yet wholesome caperuza roja, perfectly. The text, written in English with intermittent Spanish, provides educational value and lends authenticity to the tale's new context. A Spanish/English vocabulary list is included. (There is a small typo at the bottom of the vocabulary page. The Spanish should read "muy fuerte" translated very hot, rather than "fuente" which means fountain.) 2004, Raven Tree Press LLC, Ages 4 to 7.
—Michelle Negron Bueno
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780972497305
  • Publisher: Raven Tree Press, LLC
  • Publication date: 8/28/2004
  • Edition description: Bilingual Edition: English-Spanish
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 1,029,499
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.36 (w) x 11.47 (h) x 0.36 (d)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2004

    Charming re-telling of a classic

    As an English teacher, I am dismayed by the dwindling number of students who are familiar with classic folktales, fairy tales, and fables. This multicultural approach to Red Riding Hood is fun to read, fun to teach, and the illustrations are enchanting.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2004

    A delightfull twist of an old tale.

    I thorughly enjoyed this book. My 8 & 12 kids also enjoyed it. The mixture of the languages is a delightful experience.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2004

    A must read for students of all ages!

    You'll find many uses for this tantalizing new twist to an old tale. As you follow clever Isabel along her daring journey through the Chihuahuan Desert, you'll get a taste of the culture, animals, and language that make the Chihuahuan Desert the heart of the Southwest.

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  • Posted January 22, 2009

    Hispanic turn of Little Red Riding Hood fairy tale

    ISABEL AND THE HUNGRY COYOTE (Isabel y el coyote hambriento) by Keith Polette, illustrated by Esther Szegedy. Raven Tree Press, 200 S. Washington - Suite 306, Green Bay, WI 54301; www.raventreepress.com; raven@raventreepress.com. 2004. 32 pp. $16.95 hardcover, ISBN 0-9724973-0-7. English/Spanish glossary. The children's tale of Little Red Riding Hood is given a Hispanic twist, with Isabel as Red Riding Hood complete with a red hood. Basic Spanish words and phrases are inserted into a text which is about ninety percent English. 'Picking flores [flowers], the girl in the red hood sang softly.' 'This caperuza roja [red hood] keeps the sun from my face,' Isabel tells the coyote. The Spanish terms are defined in the glossary at the end of the tale. In keeping with its Hispanic twist, Isabel escapes from the malevolent coyote by pouring the basket of tamales and chile sauce she is carrying to her grandmother's into his mouth as he opens it wide to seize her. As the coyote runs away yelling, 'Fuego! Fuego! [Fire! Fire!],' Isabel escapes to her grandmother's, where the two make more tamales.

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