Isabelle’s Attic: The Story Of A Young Jewish Girl’s Survival Against The Nazis

Isabelle’s Attic: The Story Of A Young Jewish Girl’s Survival Against The Nazis

by Isabelle Teresa Huber
     
 
"Isabelle's Attic" is the story of a young Jewish girl whose life was saved from certain death at the hands of the German Nazis during World War II.
From 1942 to 1945, three-year-old Isa Hauser was hidden by a Polish Catholic family in their attic in Czortkow, Poland, her birthplace. She was one of only three Jewish children from Czortkow known to have survived

Overview

"Isabelle's Attic" is the story of a young Jewish girl whose life was saved from certain death at the hands of the German Nazis during World War II.
From 1942 to 1945, three-year-old Isa Hauser was hidden by a Polish Catholic family in their attic in Czortkow, Poland, her birthplace. She was one of only three Jewish children from Czortkow known to have survived the Nazi atrocities.
Until the early 1990s, the author, Isabelle Teresa Huber, did not speak about her story of survival, and did not associate herself as a Holocaust survivor.
Finally able to confront her truths, the flood gates opened. Encouraged by her family, she and her close friend, Nan Miller, collaborated to write the complete account of this part of her life.
Through this collaboration she has now given her children and grandchildren meaning to the idea of how dear life really is.

*****

A documentary written and produced by Kyra Phillips, based on the author’s story, “Isabelle’s Attic”, won an Emmy Award in the category of Serious news story (single report) at the 51st annual Los Angeles Area Emmy Awards.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940148774181
Publisher:
MAZO PUBLISHERS
Publication date:
08/27/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
136
File size:
8 MB

Meet the Author

Most of Isabelle Teresa Huber’s Holocaust involvement through the years consisted of being mute about it.  After attending the “1st Children of the Holocaust” meeting in Los Angeles in the early 1990s, as a much older person, she finally began to associate herself as a Holocaust survivor. Up to that point she did not feel she “belonged” to that group of people.
Finally able to confront her truths, the flood gates opened. Isabelle, with the help of her mother’s visits and carefully recorded audio-tapes, began to uncover her own hidden, repressed nightmares.  Her stories began to surface, one after another, but she did not have the confidence to take them from the verbal telling to the written page.
Now, at age seventy-four, she can’t stop talking about it seriously.  Previously, it had only been cocktail party shock treatment.  She relishes being assessed as “looking too young to be a Holocaust survivor.”
Encouraged by her family to take the risk, she accepted an offer from her close friend, Nan Miller, to dictate her life-story.  Through this collaboration she has now given her children and grandchildren meaning to the idea of how dear life really is.
Although born Jewish, Catholics played the biggest role in Isabelle’s life.  She grew up in Brooklyn, and then moved to Los Angeles. She also lived in Anchorage, Staten Island, San Francisco, and Honolulu, before returning to Los Angeles in 1973 during her husband’s medical education and residencies. 
Family vacations with three teen-age children included trips to Haiti during Papa Doc’s ouster, Chi Chi Castenango, Guatemala, when their hotel was blown up, and to Jordan, Egypt and Israel where they were almost killed more than once.
Today, Isabelle lives in the college town of Claremont, California with her Catholic husband, of forty-eight years, two alpacas, fifteen chickens, eight parrots, two peacocks, and geese and ducks on two acres of land. She has three grown children, in their forties, and five granddaughters and very few relatives.
An accomplished concert pianist, Isabelle speaks several languages, and considers her best asset to be a “people person.” 
While her motto is, “my cup is always half-full,” Isabelle’s life has always teetered on the edge of possible disaster.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >