Islamic Glass in The Corning Museum of Glass

Overview

—Contains more than 595 objects beautifully photographed and published for the first time —This first volume of a three-part series on rare early Islamic glass is of interest to art historians and scholars of Middle Eastern history The methods of finishing glass by cutting and polishing first began in the regions of the Mediterranean in the first and second century B.C. during the Roman Empire. Within the next 200 years, these finishing shops were also producing glass both cut and with details engraved into the surface. Another technique,

... See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (19) from $16.41   
  • New (10) from $22.95   
  • Used (9) from $16.41   
Sending request ...

Overview

—Contains more than 595 objects beautifully photographed and published for the first time —This first volume of a three-part series on rare early Islamic glass is of interest to art historians and scholars of Middle Eastern history The methods of finishing glass by cutting and polishing first began in the regions of the Mediterranean in the first and second century B.C. during the Roman Empire. Within the next 200 years, these finishing shops were also producing glass both cut and with details engraved into the surface. Another technique, wheel-cutting glass, was also practiced by the Romans and their contemporaries, the Sasanians, in Iran and Iraq. However, with the fall of the Roman Empire in the fifth century A.D. these methods all declined and eventually disappeared from the Mediterranean but were sustained in Western Asia. By the eighth and ninth centuries, both cutting and scratch engraving were part of the thriving repertoire of glassmakers in the central Islamic lands. In the extensive collection of cut and engraved glass presented in this volume, almost all the ornaments date between the eighth and eleventh centuries and trace their origin to present-day Egypt, Iraq, and Iran. The collection includes dishes, bowls, cups beakers, goblets, jars, pitchers, and ewers that have been newly cleaned and restored and show prevailing themes of plants, birds, and scenes from daily life. Together with an essay by David Whitehouse, executive director and curator of Ancient and Islamic Glass at The Corning Museum of Glass, this volume serves to illuminate and add to the study of the techniques and evolution of ancient glass in the Middle East.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781555953553
  • Publisher: Hudson Hills Press
  • Publication date: 2/25/2010
  • Pages: 432
  • Product dimensions: 9.40 (w) x 12.10 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)