An Island Called Home: Returning to Jewish Cuba [NOOK Book]

Overview

Yiddish-speaking Jews thought Cuba was supposed to be a mere layover on the journey to the United States when they arrived in the island country in the 1920s. They even called it “Hotel Cuba.” But then the years passed, and the many Jews who came there from Turkey, Poland, and war-torn Europe stayed in Cuba. The beloved island ceased to be a hotel, and Cuba eventually became “home.” But after Fidel Castro came to power in 1959, the majority of the Jews opposed his communist regime and left in a mass exodus. ...

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An Island Called Home: Returning to Jewish Cuba

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Overview

Yiddish-speaking Jews thought Cuba was supposed to be a mere layover on the journey to the United States when they arrived in the island country in the 1920s. They even called it “Hotel Cuba.” But then the years passed, and the many Jews who came there from Turkey, Poland, and war-torn Europe stayed in Cuba. The beloved island ceased to be a hotel, and Cuba eventually became “home.” But after Fidel Castro came to power in 1959, the majority of the Jews opposed his communist regime and left in a mass exodus. Though they remade their lives in the United States, they mourned the loss of the Jewish community they had built on the island.

            As a child of five, Ruth Behar was caught up in the Jewish exodus from Cuba. Growing up in the United States, she wondered about the Jews who stayed behind. Who were they and why had they stayed? What traces were left of the Jewish presence, of the cemeteries, synagogues, and Torahs? Who was taking care of this legacy? What Jewish memories had managed to survive the years of revolutionary atheism?

            An Island Called Home is the story of Behar’s journey back to the island to find answers to these questions. Unlike the exotic image projected by the American media, Behar uncovers a side of Cuban Jews that is poignant and personal. Her moving vignettes of the individuals she meets are coupled with the sensitive photographs of Havana-based photographer Humberto Mayol, who traveled with her.

            Together, Behar’s poetic and compassionate prose and Mayol’s shadowy and riveting photographs create an unforgettable portrait of a community that many have seen though few have understood. This book is the first to show both the vitality and the heartbreak that lie behind the project of keeping alive the flame of Jewish memory in Cuba.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

A professor at the University of Michigan, Behar seeks a better understanding of her roots and of the Jewish experience in her native Cuba. Traversing the island, Behar becomes a confidante to myriad Jewish strangers. Through one-on-one interviews and black-and-white images taken by her photographer, Humberto Mayol, she uncovers the diasporic thread that connects Cuban Jews. Familial stories of wandering beginning in the 1920s tell of displaced Polish and German Jews-escapees from anti-Semitism and Auschwitz-opening mom-and-pop shops in La Habana Vieja, becoming peddlers, replacing Yiddish with Spanish and settling into Latino life only to be uprooted within decades. An estimated 16,500 Jews lived in Cuba in the late 1950s, when a mass exodus to Miami and New York took place-a reaction to Castro's budding communist revolution. This diligent recounting and pictorial collage of interviews with adolescents, the aging, the impoverished and the political by Behar preserves in memory the people and places that make up Cuba's Jewish story. (Nov.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

Behar (anthropology, Univ. of Michigan; The Vulnerable Observer: Anthropology That Breaks Your Heart) spent her earliest years in Cuba before her family left during the 1960s Jewish exodus when Castro took over the country. The exodus seemed to spell the end of a remarkable symbiotic 20th-century experience of formerly European Jews who became Cubans. Behar returned to Cuba as a professional anthropologist many times and what she found there surprised her: although small in number and quite assimilated, a Jewish community still remains. This book documents her experiences with wonderfully telling photographs by award-winning Havana photographer Mayol and short descriptive chapters focusing on some fascinating Cuban Jewish people and places. Behar weaves in autobiographical comments through her visits to old Jewish cemeteries and other buildings and scenes that played a role in her own family saga. Readers will be charmed and enthralled by her deeply felt tales. Recommended for libraries with strong ethnic and/or Jewish studies collections.
—Paul Kaplan

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813543864
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press
  • Publication date: 10/1/2007
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 311,567
  • File size: 9 MB

Meet the Author

Ruth Behar is a professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan. The recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Fellows award, she is the author of The Vulnerable Observer: Anthropology That Breaks Your Heart and director of the documentary, Adio Kerida (Goodbye Dear Love). Ruth's website is ruthbehar.com
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Table of Contents

Map of Cuba (showing places visited)
Running Away from Home to Run toward Home
Part 1
Looking for Henry
A Kaddish for the Jews Who Rest in Jewish Cemeteries in Cuba and for Raquel's Mother Who Does Not
Part 2
A Tour of Havana's Synagogues
The Kosher Butcher Shop
The Shirt That Holds Sadness
Los Prinstein
In the Realm of Lost Things
How to Pack Your Suitcase
Enrique Bender's BlueGreen Eyes Remind Me of My Grandfather
The Dancing Turk
Monday Morning in LuyanÃ?
Danayda Levy's School Report
May Day with a Jewish Communist
The Whispering Writer
The Three Things JosÃ? MartÃ- Said All Real Men Must Do
Einstein in Havana
SalomÃ?n the Schnorrer
Mr. Fisher's TwiceYearly Gifts
Becoming Ruth Berezniak
After Everyone Has Left
The Ketubah That Became a Passport
When I See You Again There Will Be No Pain or Forgetting
Part 3
Traces
Part 4
Simboulita's Parakeet
Seven Jewish Weddings in CamagÃ'ey
Che Waits for a New Frame
Pearls Left in Cienfuegos
The Moses of Santa Clara
A Conversation Next to El Mamey
Villa Elisa
The Covenant of Abraham
Salvador's Three Wives
A Beautiful Pineapple
The Last Jew of Palma Soriano
The Mizrahi Clan in GuantÃnamo
Part 5
Departures
My Room on Bitterness Street
How This Book Came to Be a Photojourney
Chronology
Notes
Bibliography
Acknowledgments
List of Photographs
About the Author and Photographer
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